74

The Short Answer Strictly speaking, you are correct: a government shut down does not involve the government "running out of money." A more accurate statement would be that the government isn't allowed to spend its money. The process for raising and spending public money involves checks and balances (many of which were inherited from Britain, some of which ...


73

Rather than trying to address the claim of who is to blame, I will focus on the part of the question asking for the spefic actions that were taken and give you timeline of events to let you decide for yourself who deserves how much of the blame. 19th December, 2018: Senate passes without any dissent by voice vote a bi-partisan short-term spending bill ...


62

First, slavery has literally nothing at all to do with whether or not someone is paid, nor with how much they're paid. Slavery and involuntary servitude are forced labor, not unpaid labor. If you are paying someone millions of dollars but threaten to kill them if they quit, that's involuntary servitude. If you pay them nothing but they're free to walk away, ...


59

To address the technical question, FEC will not function during shutdown: https://www.fec.gov/updates/shutdown-announcement-2018/. Like many federal agencies, the FEC will be unable to provide any services during the government shutdown. Most agency staff will not report to work, and the agency’s offices will be closed to the public. ... You will be ...


59

If Congress has the 2/3 votes to override a Presidential veto, they can pass any budget they want with zero consideration for what the President thinks. Ever since the Impoundment Control Act of 1974, the President no longer has the authority to refuse spending Congressionally allocated funds. Therefore Republicans are free to end the shutdown by agreeing ...


52

Forcing a government shutdown doesn't get Trump any budget for anything. It's the threat of a government shutdown with which he hopes to force Congress to cooperate. A government shutdown happens when Congress and President can not agree on a budget plan. The result is that the executive branch of the US government is unable to provide most of its services, ...


42

I’m sure there is something that I am missing (certain vote percentages, loopholes, who knows), but to me the logic seems that if Republicans had the ability to pass the funding measure and then didn’t, wouldn’t the shutdown be the Republicans fault? I think there are a couple things: first, the new Democratic majority; and second, the filibuster/cloture ...


35

The government shutdown is caused by a lapse in funding for government operations and agencies. The Antideficiency Act mandates that the government cannot incur "obligations or the making of expenditures (outlays) in excess of amounts available in appropriations or funds". As explained by The Hill, this act "provides the framework for which government ...


34

If Congress - House and Senate - cannot agree to a bill with 2/3 majority, two years go by, and there will be new elections for all House seats (and about a third of the Senate). Some voters will be annoyed with the shutdown, and vote for someone who is more interested in ending it. If that is not sufficient, two more years will go by, and more people will ...


26

It’s for “procedural reasons to preserve his right to bring the bill up again”. This article from the Washington Post explains why former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid always seemingly vote against his own party. It's that somebody on the winning side of the cloture vote — in this case, the side voting against cloture — has to file a "motion to ...


25

They shutdown because they didn't have a budget, and the law limits what a US Government agency can spend if they don't have a budget. They can provide certain essential functions: air traffic control, border security, food inspections, military,...; but not other non-essential functions: national parks, department of education, large portions of NASA. This ...


25

This isn't really that difficult: It's a typical standoff in which neither side wants to budge. Democrats could vote for the wall, but haven't. So, sure, it can be considered at least partially their fault. That's not to say Trump isn't to blame, either. But, if ending the shutdown were enough of a priority, then Democrats could simply vote for the money for ...


24

Does it mean that this party is unable to agree between its members in Congress and its President? This doesn't really have anything to do with the president. Sixty votes is the threshold to invoke cloture on most votes, including this one. Trump has nothing whatsoever to do with cloture. He can neither block it nor grant it. It's entirely a Senate ...


24

The NORAD Santa tracker will operate as normal, according to the NORAD official twitter webpage (@Norad_Northcom) In the event of a government shutdown, NORAD will continue with its 63-year tradition of NORAD Tracks Santa on Dec. 24. Military personnel who conduct NORAD Tracks Santa are supported by approximately 1,500 volunteers who make the ...


21

The other answers address the legal reasons for the shutdown, so I'm going to address this part of the original question and the misconception about the role of the Federal Reserve. I understand that the current Federal Bond Buying program (80 Billion a month) are allowing a fixed supply of money to the American Government. This is incorrect. The Federal ...


20

Does he not have the power, as President, to overrule the government? No. Congress controls the budget. In order to spend money, Donald Trump (or any president) needs Congress to appropriate it. From the constitution: The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common ...


19

Passing a spending bill in the Senate requires bi-partisan cooperation because it requires overcoming a 60-vote requirement. The President demanded that any spending bill include a line for $5 billion (about 0.13% of the total yearly spending) for a border barrier (which he colloquially called a "wall"). The Republicans were willing to include the line ...


17

As is often the case, the answer is Yes and No. Specifically yes in some ways, and no in others. The chief place where parliamentary systems win out over the separately elected executive branch (at least in terms of preventing a government shutdown) is that the government (i.e. executive) is chosen by the legislative body. This means there cannot be a long-...


16

In a parliamentary system, the government is, by definition, the party (or coalition) of parties which controls the lower house (in the UK, the House of Commons). In particular, achieving parliamentary approval for supply -- i.e. the ability to spend money -- is a make or break issue for a government, akin to vote of confidence. If a government loses supply,...


16

They can, with 2/3 majority in both houses (US Constitution, Article 1, Section 7, clause 2)...but they have to agree to actually hold that vote. Currently, the Senate has indicated that it will not do so, without the bill being something the President will not veto. So effectively, they are choosing not to create a scenario where they would have the option ...


16

If they were to override his veto, would this end the shutdown, or would the President somehow be able to continue it anyway? This would end the shutdown. I wonder if there is any argument that, even if Congress allocates money for the Government, it is up to the President to decide whether to actually spend it. Congress appropriates money for specific ...


15

To put in context that OP could understand, the US federal Government is similar to the government offices of the European union. I'm not saying the function or structure is similar, but I'm illustrating how far it is from the affairs of the normal citizen. For example, I look out my window and my street is plowed, the highways are salted, the local ...


14

The shutdown doesn't really save the government much money. The pay that is currently being withheld from exempted employees is guaranteed to be paid to them once the funding is there, and Congress has always voted in the past to send back pay to the non-exempt employees as well, and has indicated it will do so again now. Besides that, while the shutdown ...


13

Elections are run by individual states and are certified by Congress, the core process wouldn't change. The FEC is a regulatory body that focuses primarily on campaign finances, they aren't really responsible for the core functions of elections. Candidates would still be responsible for following FEC rules, though there may be no auditing/enforcement during ...


12

It is irrelevant whether the OPM designates the President or members of Congress (or Supreme Court Justices) as essential or not. The Constitution provides clauses which protect their salaries. They may or may not actually receive any checks during the shutdown, but they must not be docked any pay. Congress: Article I, Section 6. Clause 1 The ...


12

So, I have special knowledge about this. Claude Moore Farm Park is about 15 minutes from my house, and I go there regularly. The way the park works is this - its technically a "farm park" that is NPS property too small to necessitate regular monitoring. (Balls Bluff, the smallest national battlefield, isn't far away). The property itself is right off of ...


12

No the US has no mechanism for resolving this. That's a consequence of two things that are distinct about the US system (compared with the Westminster and similar systems) The system where all budgets must be approved by both chambers of the legislature and the President, with no built in mechanism for resolving disputes. Coupled with an alternating ...


11

Having funds available isn't the problem, they cannot spend money that hasn't been authorized by Congress under the Antideficiency Act Congress's authority on this matter derives from the Constitution. Article I, Section 9, Clause 7 imposes accountability on Congressional spending: No money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of ...


11

Article One of the United States Constitution States: Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behavior, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a member. This is a common thing for many bodies which form to make discussions, and there can be as many 'rules' agreed upon by these bodies as there are '...


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