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1

While the question refers to the US Senate, I have visited both the Bavarian parliament and the German Bundestag and received a brief introduction of why these still rely on stenographers. They not only pick up who is talking (i.e. at the main mic) but also pick up things such as laughter in the SPD, jeering in the CDU, amusement in the Green party, voiced ...


2

After a certain point, adding more partners to a coalition makes it more stable. The critical factor is not the total number of partners but the number of major partners. Parties that could make the coalition lose the majority by withdrawing their support. The current Finnish coalition is not particularly stable, because three out of the five parties are ...


4

I am not sure that I interpret correctly the data from Wikipedia, but Di Rupo's government included members from six parties: Flemish side: CD&V, Open Vld, sp.a French side: PS, MR, cdH As a side note, negotiations were so complicated that they took about one and half years, most probably due to very fragmented political landscape that resulted from ...


7

The specifics aren't clear yet. I know my main source is a few months old, but to my knowledge, no specific plans have been presented yet. Plans to decriminalize not paying the license fee are looked at, according to then chief secretary to the Treasury and confirmed by the PM's office. According to the Guardian (dated 15 December 2019): Even more ...


2

Practice is more powerful here than theory in my opinion. The constitution has a theoretical pathway for a popularly elected ordinary citizen to become Head of State - apparently classifying it as a republic. However, the political realities of Samoa, framed as they are by the deeply entrenched traditional chiefly system (fa'amatai) means it is much better ...


4

Is there a term in US politics for when the President's party doesn't control (both chambers) of Congress? The term is divided. Divided government in the United States In the United States, divided government describes a situation in which one party controls the executive branch while another party controls one or both houses of the legislative branch. ...


3

In my country, the UK, which - due in part to the first past the post electoral system - does not generally entertain diverse coalitions, I am not aware of any examples of 6-party coalitions. There have, however, been a few 5-party coalition governments, all under fairly exceptional circumstances. The Churchill war ministry (1940-45) consisted of 5 parties, ...


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