New answers tagged

1

Politics and economy are inseparable From the Marxist-Leninist viewpoint (exposed already in the Communist manifesto, and developed in many works afterwards), a political system is inseparable from the economic one, since The distribution of wealth is ultimately determined by those who hold the political power (distributing the wealth either directly to ...


2

TLDR: This criteria had to do with post-USSR Eastward enlargement criteria and shows up in a NATO summit of January 1994. This was what I originally thought, and put as a comment: I wonder if it wasn't a blurb added at the time to explicitly filter out Communist countries, keeping in mind NATO's original reason for being was to oppose Communism in the ...


-1

NATO was formed at the beginning of the Cold War to counter the Soviet bloc and its (presumed) expansionist tendencies. It wanted to emphasize capitalism as a fundamental principle because most socialist (as well as many purely authoritarian) regimes style themselves as democratic republics, which creates ambiguity. There was a general ideological agreement ...


3

Here, NATO wants candidates to have [s]hown a commitment to promoting stability and well-being by economic liberty, social justice and environmental responsibility It also expects candidates to [c]onform to basic principles embodied in the Washington Treaty: democracy, individual liberty and the rule of law So NATO seems to have concluded that a market ...


6

These rules prevent other people from pretending they live at your place which can put some burden on the actual residents. Unfourtunately, Latvia does trust people on this. You can select that the legal basis of declaring that address is an oral agreement with the owner and you're done. We had this happen to our address, so I am qualified to tell about the ...


6

Germany actually did trust its citizens when registering their address in the past (between 2002 and 2015). This did result in some of the problems described in the other answers. Specifically, credit card fraud and tamperimg with school districts were mentioned in media reports from that time (example).


21

There are tons of reasons for this. Since you said any government is welcome, my examples will mostly be in the U.S. where I am. Identification I'm not familiar with how it's used in Slovakia, but, in most countries, your government-issued ID is for, well, identification purposes. That is, it's supposed to be one of the things that other sources (including ...


7

In France, as a French, I am always asked for a "certificate of residency" (justificatif de domicile). This can be pretty much anything more or less official but usually a bill is what is expected (traditionally your electricity bill). This is because you are entitled to several things (free membership at the library, regional money for cultural ...


15

If the government only wants an address to post the document to, they won't be asking for this kind of evidence. However, your address, and history of addresses, is part of your identity, and so assumed fake until proven otherwise. When you are applying for an identity document, the assumption is that, until you prove otherwise, you are trying to commit some ...


46

Having the wrong address in a government database could allow many types of fraud, from taxes to welfare. Imagine you tell the Austrians that you live in Slovakia, and the Slovaks that you live in Austria. Or vice versa. When it comes to votes, you might be able to vote twice in European elections. So the Slovaks want to see documentation. And they demand it ...


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