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These are a few reasons why each group is against Obamacare. With individuals — It requires nearly all Americans to get health insurance. Some do not think that the government should force citizens to buy health insurance and penalise them if they do not do so. There are taxes that Americans have to pay should they not buy health insurance. This is also ...


144

What the other answers fail to address is a fundamental flaw in capitalism for certain types of business: Your average human places their continued survival above all other priorities. This concept is called 'inelastic demand'. In order for supply and demand to work properly, both entities need to be free to disengage and seek other options. But when one'...


137

The short answer to this question is that 2019-nCoV is new. All the other diseases you mentioned are known quantities: epidemiologists have a good idea how they behave, how they spread, what is likely to happen in a variety of different scenarios, etc. But this disease represents a new mutation that behaves differently from other coronaviruses. It's far more ...


101

I can't speak for Rebecca's judgement in interpreting those words of Trump, but for instance a NYT article says: “Our people want to return to work,” Mr. Trump declared Tuesday on Twitter, adding, “THE CURE CANNOT BE WORSE (by far) THAN THE PROBLEM!” In essence, he was raising an issue that economists have long grappled with: How can a society assess ...


98

How free is the US health care market really? The reason that free competition has not made health care in the US cheaper is that free competition has in fact been severely restricted for decades. As described in this article, regulation of the health care industry has been continuously expanded (decreasing the supply of drugs, doctors, etc.), while ...


67

Respectfully, I think complacency is misplaced. Malaria is locale-specific, and doesn't really affect rich first world countries. While it certainly could receive better funding, it is also easy to see why it doesn't affect the average European or American much. HIV/AIDS is partially tied to lifestyle and one is at low risk if not in a risk category. In ...


66

Specifically with reference to the UK, an article in the Guardian reports that Experts have warned about the risk that if tough measures are taken too soon, “fatigue” may set in, prompting the public to disregard the advice just as the virus reaches its peak. Effectively the argument is that, absent some sort of enforcement squad if people are told to ...


65

The short answer is because complaining is louder than passive agreement. It often doesn't matter if a bill is popular if there's a vocal objection to it by a sufficient minority. The objection can be in the form of protests, or a special interest or in some cases, an issue that can swing votes, but some kind of objection, with enough teeth to get noticed ...


61

Tax cuts I could understand a candidate promising tax cuts and then after being elected scrapping Obamacare to pay for them. Obamacare repeal includes tax cuts: .9% Medicare tax surcharge on high income Americans 2.9% Medicare tax on capital gains, dividends, etc. Medical devices tax Individual mandate Business mandate And it expands certain tax ...


58

In a nutshell, the income threshold necessary to qualify for Medicaid (the poverty line prior to Medicaid expansion) is lower than the amount of income needed to pay for the medical care that Medicaid provides to people who are eligible for it. For example, if you need dialysis to stay healthy (which is not ER room care), it costs more than $70,000 per ...


56

Medical If your question is: Would the military be obliged to pay for the transition? Then the answer is yes. Prior to Donald Trump's tweets, the US Military had promulgated guidance on how it would support members transitioning. Following a diagnosis of gender dysphoria, the Military member would be supported through medical treatments, to include ...


49

This is a bit of a phony question on several levels. To answer, they absolutely HAVE emphasized the healthcare cost savings. First of all, you claim that they focus on "increased healthcare spending," in the title, but then you talk about increased GOVERNMENT spending in the body of the question. In a system that is based on PRIVATE, FOR-PROFIT healthcare ...


47

Future potential For a new disease, it doesn't matter how many infected or dead people there have been as of now, it matters how much infected or dead people can we expect in the future if we don't do anything. It's possible and plausible to stop a new disease before it reaches it's full potential. If we stop a new "malaria-2" before it has the chance to ...


46

Your question seems to be equivalent to: why don't Democrats start acting like (small-government) Republicans when it comes to healthcare? Because that's not their idea of healthcare, or rather it's not what their electorate wants/expects: (Some Democrats like Bill Curry even blame Obama for promising [in 2008] but eventually failing to deliver a federal ...


45

Trump is weighing the economy vs lives saved. That is his job No leader wants to be in the position Trump is in. For instance, it has been stated that Winston Churchill knew in advance of a bombing raid on Coventry but chose to take no action. Ignoring the controversy over the assertion, this comment at the end is apropos "But even if Churchill had known ...


43

A government can try to ban anything, but in case of tobacco there are various reasons not to. There are people who insist on their right to smoke. They might tolerate state-imposed health-advise, but being entirely prohibited from smoking might cause them to no longer vote for the politicians who supported the ban. There are economical interests. ...


43

Universal health insurance which is affordable for everyone can only work when the healthy people subsidize the people with chronic health problems. If you have a completely unregulated private insurance sector, then the private insurers would be free to choose their customers. Given that chance they would reject anyone with pre-existing conditions, because ...


43

Skeptical answer One could give a skeptic's answer for any form of this question in the context of a political campaign: presumably the candidates feel this answer will be more likely to get them nominated by their party in their campaign for President of the United States. However, although this position is not made explicit, it is consistent with the ...


41

Jeff Lambert has found the Sanders proposal. SEC. 107. PROHIBITION AGAINST DUPLICATING COVERAGE. (a) IN GENERAL.—Beginning on the effective date described in section 106(a), it shall be unlawful for— (1) a private health insurer to sell health insurance coverage that duplicates the benefits provided under this Act; or (2) an employer to provide ...


40

There's a couple of other factors in play here as well Obama intentionally lied about the effects of the bill A politician lying is nothing new, but your typical political lie is of the statistical variety. In other words, you oversell the benefits and undersell the impact and make it look like you're just arguing about numbers (Obamacare also sold a $2500 ...


40

Government fiat, by design, infringes on the liberties of it's citizens. Frequently such infringement is desirable or at least acceptable: enforcement of property rights, maintenance of public infrastructure, etc. But the gains have to be carefully weighed against not only the loss of liberty in a specific case, but the possibility of creating the unintended ...


39

I place the blame on the fees charged by drug makers, doctors, nurses, and hospitals. The market for healthcare does not have the "supply and demand" dynamic. Patients just have to "pay-up". After a cycling accident fractured my clavicle, I didn't call 3 or 4 EMT services for price quotes. Someone else had to dial 911, the EMTs took me away to the ER ...


36

Shutting down schools, banning large gatherings and pushing people to do home office has a massive economic cost. Of course you never get the exact numbers on either death or cost but essentially you have to answer questions like: How many death does one need to prevent to make a 10% reduction of annual GDP worth it? This is a complicated ethical question ...


34

Evidence based medicine really only dates from the 1980's. In the UK that era was dominated by the Thatcher government, which valued freedom of choice and decentralization. Having the NHS act more like the private sector was seen as a positive thing. Towards the end of the century the focus changed to promoting best available practice, in particular with ...


33

Bernie Sanders tweeted the graphic below in April of 2019, it was accompanied by the following text (emphasis mine): Every other major country has made health care a right for all. Anyone who says the United States cannot do the same is selling the American people short. #MedicareForAll While not a definition, the examples speak for themselves. Indeed, ...


32

Costs Yes the military provides health care for soldiers, which covers necessary medical treatment, including treatment for gender dysphoria (also including SRS if necessary). The costs to the military for this are negligible. RAND estimated the cost for transition-related care for trans people to be between $2.4 million and $8.4 million annually: ...


31

One reason might be that many Americans apparently did not know that the vilified Obamacare is what is paying for their health insurance.


29

This answer is meant to supplement others here with some further reasons why conservatives are against the Obamacare system. Obama falsely promised the public some critical things about the system that came to be called Obamacare: ...No matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise: If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your ...


28

You can expect truth in campaign speeches, but not scientific definitions. For an approximation of major countries, try the G7. Of course the G7 misses China, India, Russia, Brazil, which are quite important in the 21st century world. Canada: Yes. France: Yes. Germany: Yes. Italy: Yes. Japan: Yes. UK: Yes. Those "yes" are never absolute. Some procedures ...


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