143

What the other answers fail to address is a fundamental flaw in capitalism for certain types of business: Your average human places their continued survival above all other priorities. This concept is called 'inelastic demand'. In order for supply and demand to work properly, both entities need to be free to disengage and seek other options. But when one'...


136

The short answer to this question is that 2019-nCoV is new. All the other diseases you mentioned are known quantities: epidemiologists have a good idea how they behave, how they spread, what is likely to happen in a variety of different scenarios, etc. But this disease represents a new mutation that behaves differently from other coronaviruses. It's far more ...


101

I can't speak for Rebecca's judgement in interpreting those words of Trump, but for instance a NYT article says: “Our people want to return to work,” Mr. Trump declared Tuesday on Twitter, adding, “THE CURE CANNOT BE WORSE (by far) THAN THE PROBLEM!” In essence, he was raising an issue that economists have long grappled with: How can a society assess ...


99

How free is the US health care market really? The reason that free competition has not made health care in the US cheaper is that free competition has in fact been severely restricted for decades. As described in this article, regulation of the health care industry has been continuously expanded (decreasing the supply of drugs, doctors, etc.), while ...


67

Respectfully, I think complacency is misplaced. Malaria is locale-specific, and doesn't really affect rich first world countries. While it certainly could receive better funding, it is also easy to see why it doesn't affect the average European or American much. HIV/AIDS is partially tied to lifestyle and one is at low risk if not in a risk category. In ...


66

Specifically with reference to the UK, an article in the Guardian reports that Experts have warned about the risk that if tough measures are taken too soon, “fatigue” may set in, prompting the public to disregard the advice just as the virus reaches its peak. Effectively the argument is that, absent some sort of enforcement squad if people are told to ...


49

This is a bit of a phony question on several levels. To answer, they absolutely HAVE emphasized the healthcare cost savings. First of all, you claim that they focus on "increased healthcare spending," in the title, but then you talk about increased GOVERNMENT spending in the body of the question. In a system that is based on PRIVATE, FOR-PROFIT healthcare ...


47

Future potential For a new disease, it doesn't matter how many infected or dead people there have been as of now, it matters how much infected or dead people can we expect in the future if we don't do anything. It's possible and plausible to stop a new disease before it reaches it's full potential. If we stop a new "malaria-2" before it has the chance to ...


46

Your question seems to be equivalent to: why don't Democrats start acting like (small-government) Republicans when it comes to healthcare? Because that's not their idea of healthcare, or rather it's not what their electorate wants/expects: (Some Democrats like Bill Curry even blame Obama for promising [in 2008] but eventually failing to deliver a federal ...


45

Trump is weighing the economy vs lives saved. That is his job No leader wants to be in the position Trump is in. For instance, it has been stated that Winston Churchill knew in advance of a bombing raid on Coventry but chose to take no action. Ignoring the controversy over the assertion, this comment at the end is apropos "But even if Churchill had known ...


43

Skeptical answer One could give a skeptic's answer for any form of this question in the context of a political campaign: presumably the candidates feel this answer will be more likely to get them nominated by their party in their campaign for President of the United States. However, although this position is not made explicit, it is consistent with the ...


41

Jeff Lambert has found the Sanders proposal. SEC. 107. PROHIBITION AGAINST DUPLICATING COVERAGE. (a) IN GENERAL.—Beginning on the effective date described in section 106(a), it shall be unlawful for— (1) a private health insurer to sell health insurance coverage that duplicates the benefits provided under this Act; or (2) an employer to provide ...


40

I place the blame on the fees charged by drug makers, doctors, nurses, and hospitals. The market for healthcare does not have the "supply and demand" dynamic. Patients just have to "pay-up". After a cycling accident fractured my clavicle, I didn't call 3 or 4 EMT services for price quotes. Someone else had to dial 911, the EMTs took me away to the ER ...


36

Shutting down schools, banning large gatherings and pushing people to do home office has a massive economic cost. Of course you never get the exact numbers on either death or cost but essentially you have to answer questions like: How many death does one need to prevent to make a 10% reduction of annual GDP worth it? This is a complicated ethical question ...


34

Evidence based medicine really only dates from the 1980's. In the UK that era was dominated by the Thatcher government, which valued freedom of choice and decentralization. Having the NHS act more like the private sector was seen as a positive thing. Towards the end of the century the focus changed to promoting best available practice, in particular with ...


33

Bernie Sanders tweeted the graphic below in April of 2019, it was accompanied by the following text (emphasis mine): Every other major country has made health care a right for all. Anyone who says the United States cannot do the same is selling the American people short. #MedicareForAll While not a definition, the examples speak for themselves. Indeed, ...


28

You can expect truth in campaign speeches, but not scientific definitions. For an approximation of major countries, try the G7. Of course the G7 misses China, India, Russia, Brazil, which are quite important in the 21st century world. Canada: Yes. France: Yes. Germany: Yes. Italy: Yes. Japan: Yes. UK: Yes. Those "yes" are never absolute. Some procedures ...


24

AIDS Trump Administration Secures Historic Donation of Billions of Dollars in HIV Prevention Drugs. The agreement between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Gilead will last until at least December 31, 2025 and possibly through December 31, 2030, and will provide medication to treat individuals who are at risk for HIV and who are ...


23

The CDC covers the cost of testing itself, however, this may not be the only type of cost incurred. A recent New York Times article presents a case study of exactly the sort of scenario described in the question. Americans who were living in China and evacuated from Wuhan did not have health insurance in the US and were given a $3,918 bill for care during ...


20

From the transcript of the second night of the debate, we can see that both Biden and Buttigieg addressed this question. I'm not aware of any public statements from other candidates on this issue, but my suspicion is that they would likely agree with these points: BUTTIGIEG: Because our country is healthier when everybody is healthier. And remember, we’re ...


19

Some basic facts If we look at previous years (using the dropdown menu in your link), we see that it used to be a lot less. The percentage of the budget allocated to health care over the years is: 2010: 23% 2011: 29% 2012: 27% 2013: 30% 2014: 33% 2015: ? 2016: 39% 2017: 43% 2018: 44% 2019: 45% 2020: 46%. In that, we see a clear increasing trend. Isn't ...


18

The central tenet of the question is that the healthcare policies of Sanders and Warren are "mostly focused on increased government funding". This is a misrepresentation of both candidates' plans to move to single-payer healthcare. Both plans are called "Medicare-for-all" but include significant differences on how they'd be funded. Luckily the question here ...


18

If the (reopened, but still rather unclear to me) question is why is the news media prioritizing this, the answer is (duh) because it's new. If the question is why is China prioritizing this, e.g. building an entire hospital for it in Wuhan... look no further of how the problem is being politicized elsewhere: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Thursday ...


18

I think you're looking at this the wrong way. Many factors impact prices. Competition doesn't necessarily mean that prices will be lower year-over-year. Competition means that prices will be lower than they would be if there was no competition. If prices went up by 5% but they would have gone up by 8% in a non-competitive environment, then competition ...


18

While it has clearly been shown by the virility of the virus so far that travel restrictions will not stop the inevitable community spread of the illness, and that their effectiveness as impeding the spread of the virus is small, the aim of the policy is no longer to stop the virus, but to delay it. This was confirmed as current policy in the UK's response ...


15

When the NHS was founded in 1948 homoeopathic treatments were not completely disapproved of Several founding hospitals of the NHS were homoeopathic see https://www.britishhomeopathic.org/homeopathy/what-is-homeopathy/homeopathy-and-the-nhs/ Without getting into any controversy about if there is any value in the treatments, it's clear that end users ...


14

First off, the word "free" that was originally in the question is a complete misnomer at best (at worst it would be putting words in their mouths). Nothing is free. Most universal coverage schemes are paid for at least partially through some kind of income or payroll tax, which every employee/employer pays (even if the workers in question are not citizens or ...


14

The UK has a GDP of $2.91 trillion (PPP). Japan has a GDP of $5.42 trillion. (source). The UK spends about 7% of the world's $1.36 trillion on pharma R&D, or about $95 billion. Japan spends 13%, or $177 billion. (source) So the UK spends 3.26% of GDP on pharma research. Japan spends 3.26% on pharma research. There is no significant difference in ...


14

It's a balancing act. You want to save as many people from the virus as possible, but you also don't want to disrupt the economy any more than you need to. This isn't just people being greedy either, many people living paycheck to paycheck cannot handle a recession. Some of these people will, after losing everything, commit suicide. Others will turn to ...


14

To delve a bit into philosophy here, Trump demonstrates a distorted form of what Nietzsche called 'master morality,' which might seem alien to most people. Nietzsche's master morality values strength, power, beauty, victory, wealth: all the material/physical symbols of practical success are interpreted as moral goods, and all their opposites or lacks are ...


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