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From the side that justifies the alarm we can say that Malaria is constrained by climate Tubercolosis is lethal only among the population weakened by malnutrition and other factors related to poverty HIV/AIDS is not as infectious as influenza. Instead the growing population and the increasing mobility and urbanisation favour the spread of flu like ...


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China has instituted the largest quarantine in history. What we know is that the health care system in Wuhan is overwhelmed, despite herculean efforts to control the disease. Corona virus statistics cannot be trusted, it is too early. Amesh Adalja of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security in Baltimore, said: In an outbreak your really have to ...


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If the (reopened, but still rather unclear to me) question is why is the news media prioritizing this, the answer is (duh) because it's new. If the question is why is China prioritizing this, e.g. building an entire hospital for it in Wuhan... look no further of how the problem is being politicized elsewhere: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Thursday ...


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Future potential For a new disease, it doesn't matter how many infected or dead people there have been as of now, it matters how much infected or dead people can we expect in the future if we don't do anything. It's possible and plausible to stop a new disease before it reaches it's full potential. If we stop a new "malaria-2" before it has the chance to ...


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The short answer to this question is that 2019-nCoV is new. All the other diseases you mentioned are known quantities: epidemiologists have a good idea how they behave, how they spread, what is likely to happen in a variety of different scenarios, etc. But this disease represents a new mutation that behaves differently from other coronaviruses. It's far more ...


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Respectfully, I think complacency is misplaced. Malaria is locale-specific, and doesn't really affect rich first world countries. While it certainly could receive better funding, it is also easy to see why it doesn't affect the average European or American much. HIV/AIDS is partially tied to lifestyle and one is at low risk if not in a risk category. In ...


6

Here are some details on what got cut this year from the CDC (note: there were cuts in the previous Trump years as well) Among its proposals for CDC, the White House budget calls for a more than $236 million cut to chronic disease prevention and health promotion, a $146 million cut for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, a more than ...


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tl;dr: There aren't any tangible consequences, unless China or other countries decide to take any. The World Health Organization is an agency of the United Nations. But it does not have any legislative powers. Its activities are limited to spending its budget on funding health-related research, spreading health information and funding healthcare projects ...


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As mentioned in some of the comments, the breadth and scope of a health system are too wide to be able to say that any system has absolutely no co-payments or deductibles (or more generally any out of pocket expenses). Any public system has to draw the line somewhere. In Australia: The govt sets the amount that the universal insurance scheme (called ...


1

Can the federal government really ban private health insurance companies from operating? Yes. Congress has the power to regulate interstate commerce. Due to a Supreme Court ruling in 1942, the power to regulate interstate commerce was expanded to include the power to regulate commerce that takes place entirely within one state, or the decision of private ...


3

You don't really need to ban private coverage in a single-payer plan, but you do need to enroll everyone for best results, so what you can't do is to allow opt-outs. The differentiating point regarding to the US is really the need to consolidate the risk pool across the population for economic efficiency. That, and using the state's purchasing power to ...


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Other answers are getting into the nitty-gritty of policy law, but it sounds like you're looking for the basic principles that govern this decision. Separate-but-equal doesn't work. From around 1890 to the 1960's, American life was segregated: Black schools and White schools, Black restaurants and White restaurants, Black banks and White banks. The Courts ...


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To explain the hypothetical "why": mixed public-private healthcare systems are almost always worse than ones which are closer to purely public. Countries which have switched to allow private treatment as another tier to a public system usually see increases in wait times for the public sector, because doctors choose to service wealthy individuals whose ...


0

"Medicare for all" doesn't have to make private insurance illegal at all. It can achieve its aims simply by leveraging the power of the Federal Government to drive out private insurance. Something some other candidates have floated is the so-called public option. The public option is where you buy your health insurance from the Federal government itself. ...


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Jeff Lambert has found the Sanders proposal. SEC. 107. PROHIBITION AGAINST DUPLICATING COVERAGE. (a) IN GENERAL.—Beginning on the effective date described in section 106(a), it shall be unlawful for— (1) a private health insurer to sell health insurance coverage that duplicates the benefits provided under this Act; or (2) an employer to provide ...


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The generic description of universal single payer national health care is as follows: Define what the national health care plan covers Enroll everyone in that national health care plan There are a lot more details that vary among countries, most of them related to how and who pays. From looking at Bernie's campaign I have no idea which specific solution he ...


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