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60

The founders had two models in particularly in mind: the Ancient Roman Senate, and the UK parliament of Monarch/Lords/Commons. In the UK, the House of Lords functioned as a Supreme Court. The founders wanted to separate the powers of the court from the Upper house, but they still wanted the upper house to have a role in approving justices. The expectation ...


50

This is trivially untrue. I haven't researched the earliest peaceful transfer of power, but here's the wikipedia article for the UK general election of 1708. That was the first UK election following the union of England and Scotland and So not even the first peaceful transition of power in England. Which is almost 100 years earlier. I feel confident you ...


47

How political parties view things is not necessarily commensurate with reality. After all, they have a political agenda to push. In this case the view of (federal) judges—Supreme Court Justices or otherwise—as dyed-in-the-wool partisans is not really borne out by the reality. The type of 5-4 split decisions that attract so much attention are in fact a ...


42

The reason for the first three increases in the size of the Supreme Court was related to the size of the country's boundaries growing. The decrease in 1866 was, reportedly, more an attempt by the Supreme Court to convince Congress to raise the salaries of the justices. When that failed, the number of justices returned to nearly where it was before. In ...


40

Has this ever happened before, that a standing Member of Congress switched parties directly from one major party to the other? If so, when? The number of party switchers is too numerous to list here. The names and dates are provided in the links. List of United States Representatives who switched parties, includes the reference to Jeff Van Drew. List of ...


32

It currently is. From 1 July: Many held posters or wore T-shirts that said, "Back the blue." ... Two people held up a banner that said, "TRUMP-- KEEP AMERICA GREAT 2020," and someone else stood with a Gadsden flag, which features a coiled rattlesnake and the phrase, "DON'T TREAD ON ME." https://www.fox13now.com/news/local-news/...


27

The Gadsden flag is not always a political statement, but it almost always is. It wasn't until the ~2010s that it became associated with the Tea Party movement. As wiki notes Starting in the 1970s, the Gadsden Flag became strongly associated with libertarianism. In the 2010s it also became associated with the American Tea Party movement.[22] Because of ...


26

This has happened a few times before, and is usually a rather extreme measure used to promote the use of, and trust in, local currency, as opposed to transactions being conducted using a more stable foreign currency, most often USD. Indonesia In 2011, Indonesia banned foreign currencies being used in domestic cash transactions: On 28 June 2011, the ...


25

The framers didn't trust democracy or the people (at the federal level) A shocking sentiment to many, perhaps, but a fact nonetheless. They often saw direct democracy on any given matter as either too onerous a burden on the people (believing they should put in great diligence to exercise the power wisely, but fearing they wouldn't due to lack of time and ...


24

There have been 29 total Supreme Court nominations during an election year throughout US history. In 19 of those cases, the President and the Senate were of the same party, and the nominee was confirmed 17 of those times. In 10 cases, the President and the Senate were of opposite parties, and only 2 were confirmed. So there is a lot of historical precedent ...


23

There are two sides to the claim: what happened, and what's significant about it. It's not hard to come up with a variety of accurate claims that what happened in 1800 was some kind of first, but the one you pose isn't one of them. Just to address the title, "was the 1800 US presidential election the first intentional, peaceful transfer of national control?" ...


22

tl;dr: Yes, all vacancies that occurred in an election year while one party controlled both presidency and Senate were filled by that party, regardless of whether the vacancy occurred before or after the election. One vacancy in 1968 did not actually occur due to the way the resignation letter was phrased. A candidate was nominated nonetheless but a ...


22

I'm assuming this is most likely because of the time where something like this almost happened, namely the Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937. The idea, as Wikipedia puts it, was the following: The Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 19371 (frequently called the "court-packing plan")[2] was a legislative initiative proposed by U.S. President ...


19

No, this has never happened before. The election with the fewest number of states which returned a different overall party winner, in terms of the state-aggregated vote count, was the 1888 Presidential Election, where only New Jersey voted differently - the state cast 98,562 votes for Democrat candidates compared to 105,468 for Republican candidates in the ...


19

Although, according to this article by Christopher Klein, the term 'grand old party' was used to refer to the Democratic party in 1859 by Democratic Governor Beriah Magoffin, and later, in 1860, by a Democratic newspaper, the 'GOP' acronym only appears to have been applied on a large scale to the Republican party. The original term which associated 'GOP' ...


19

There haven't been very many election year nominations in history, particularly not recent history. Going back to 1900, there have only been six nominations to the Supreme Court during election years: 2016, 1940, 1932, 1916 (twice), and 1912 (excluding two of Johnson's nominations that were ultimately withdrawn) 1. Five of those were of the same party, and ...


18

It depends how you define "strike", but the North Korean capture of USS Pueblo came after the Cuban crisis. And during the capture Pueblo came under fire, resulting in the death of one crew: The North Korean vessels attempted to board Pueblo, but she was maneuvered to prevent this for over two hours. A submarine chaser then opened fire with a 57 mm cannon,...


17

Currency controls or foreign exchange controls have happened time and again in history, taking different forms. At the extreme end, all foreign currency must be surrendered to the government at the official exchange rate, which might differ from the market rate. The GDR banned the possession of Western currency until the 1970s. I'm not sure when the Soviet ...


17

The existing answers are good, but I think they miss one element of why the Senate performs this function and not the House: Senators were originally appointed by state governments. The scope of federal law was originally quite slight, and a substantial amount of federal court business was naturally anticipated to deal with disputes between states. Having ...


16

Soviet Union In USSR, any dealings with foreign currency without a special permit (in essence, allowing exporters to get paid in currency and immediately trade them for roubles at the central bank and allowing outgoing travelers to get some currency for expenses, with any remainder to be traded back upon return) was a crime. (see RSSR Criminal Code article ...


16

By "single game of poker" the Journalist (who may not be a poker player) should have said "single poker hand". In other words, the cards are shuffled, five are dealt to each candidate (or their agent) and the better hand wins. There is no drawing of cards, and no betting so no skill. It is "wild west" and intentionally so. It ...


14

The other answers point to more distant historical events, but it's probably more germane to highlight the most recent change that has significantly increased the polarisation of the US Supreme court. In 2017 the Republican party removed the filibuster rules from Senate procedures around the approval of supreme court justices. This is the so-called Nuclear ...


13

There's a lot of moving parts here to understand Roe v Wade changed the politics of the court No matter which side of the aisle you're on Roe v. Wade still looms large in any SCOTUS appointment. Ginsburg's death reiterates that If Trump is able to install his nominee in that seat, both sides agree there’s a better chance than ever that Roe v. Wade — the ...


12

Links to some scholarly analysis on the topic at the bottom The first thing to understand when addressing this topic is that our political parties are not monolithic organizations with a single set of beliefs. In some political systems there are many parties with more specific ideals, and in order to reach a majority to gain control it often requires two ...


12

Argentina There is even a wiki article on it, Argentina currency controls (2011-15): Those controls limited the ability to buy or sell any foreign currency. The restriction was informally known in Argentina as "Cepo cambiario" (Spanish: exchange clamp). The first restrictions were imposed on October 31, 2011. The Tax and Customs Authority, AFIP, ...


12

Technically speaking, I suppose the counterpoint to 'reactionary' would be 'revolutionary'. The term 'reactionary' refers to elements of conservative movements who are not merely concerned with preserving social, political, and economic traditions and institutions, but who actively try to (re)assert defunct, discarded, or sometimes even imaginary traditions ...


12

This quote is actually misattributed to Rand - in fact, it was written by Leonard Peikoff in 2008 in the introduction to a new edition of We the Living. He wrote: The basic cause of totalitarianism is two ideas: men’s rejection of reason in favor of faith, and of self-interest in favor of self-sacrifice. If this is a society’s philosophical consensus, it ...


11

During Golden Age of Athens, power was transferred between competing factions (and tyrants) multiple times. Citizens from opposing factions sometimes were exiled (ostracized), and tyrants re-invited back to rule, like Alcibiades


11

Kansas was given the opportunity to vote whether it would be a slave state or a free state when it joined the union. This might sound like just a ballot measure, but it's really picking which faction would run the state. Fraud of all kinds was extreme. In some precincts, pro-slavery militias guarded polling places, turning away anyone they thought might'...


10

The Schlussstrichdebatte isn't something new the AFD picked up recently, it started right after WW2. Here is for example a poster by the FDP from 1949: The first demand was to stop denazification (the denazification program was already weak in the late 40s and stopped by the early 50s). But in general, the Schlussstrichdebatte is much less about specific ...


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