87

There is no single definition of terrorism that everyone agrees to. However, Involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that violate [... the] law; Appear to be intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; ... Is used in the USA. (Title 18, section 2331) So was it violent? Yes. Was it criminal? Yes, I don't see any ...


75

Other than the reasons of practicality mentioned, there is also the issue of international laws and treaties, specifically on the issue of "successor states." There definitely was some debate, as the situation in China is not considered a traditional succession of states scenario. But most legal scholars at the time agreed that the current "government in ...


70

How far applicable the law of a country is is decided by the law of that country. If other countries disagree, they can obviously decline to assist in the enforcement of those laws, and disallow the agents of the first country to act on their territory. There even is precedent that a country outlaws behaviour not related to it at all. For example, German law ...


42

It's true there is a clause stating extradition from Hong Kong to China cannot be based on political motives. However, there are worries the Chinese government would fabricate charges just to get dissidents over to China, as they have done or tried to do before. In general, it's very problematic to determine whether the charges are truly not political. ...


40

It is quite common for countries to prosecute both actions by and against their nationals as soon as the perpetrator enters their jurisdiction. Some will also prosecute certain crimes by anyone who is presently in their jurisdiction, no matter where they happened. Some key points to take away: For some crimes (a citizen of country A murders a citizen of ...


31

The police force in Hong Kong is drawn exclusively from people residing in Hong Kong. From the entry requirements page of the recruitment section of the HK police force's website: If you wish to join the Hong Kong Police Force as Inspector or Constable, you are expected to meet the requirements listed below. Nationality You must be a permanent ...


31

As a general rule, when I use the word terrorism, I mean it to involve a small group using terror to attack the general population. Under that kind of definition, it includes the Irish Republican Army and Daesh but excludes the Nazis in Germany or Sherman's March to the Sea. Here, we seem to have an official government (China's) using clandestine force ...


27

This reflects similar situations applicable wrt other nations. A person wanted by the US authorities flew on a Canada-Mexico flight across the US. The aircraft was instructed to land en-route in the US and the passenger was removed. Israeli nationals who have any concern that they may be legally detained by countries who have extradition treaties with their &...


22

The key is that extradition hearings are not trials that establish innocence or guilt. From your quote, the requirement for extradition is that there is: sufficient prima facie evidence that there is a possible case To people who think that China is willing to occasionally forge evidence and hold mock trials, that is equivalent to "prolonged imprisonment ...


22

A YouGov poll just published today shows significant support across the political spectrum: The full results show that the level of support among Leavers (62%) is nearly as high as that among Stayers (70%). If that seems surprising it may be relevant that a study published last year found the following: Those who subscribe strongly to the Leave identity, ...


19

Countries do this all the time. Sometimes, they will claim universal jurisdiction for crimes they consider particularly heinous or crucial to their national security (think Julian Assange). Many jurisdiction will prosecute crimes like defamation based on the victim's location (the perpetrator's might not even be known initially). Some countries get some ...


16

Sure. Everyone gets a perspective, so if, to you, that constitutes political censorship, then I can see how that argument gets made. But the flip side of that argument is true also. If the majority of those 200,000 accounts were bots meant to stifle speech from their political opponents, then the argument can be made that Twitter is trying to do something ...


16

The United Kingdom recognized the People's Republic of China on January 6, 1950. Therefore by the time of Thatcher's negotiations, she was obviously going to negotiate with the PRC instead of Taiwan.


15

There is no provision in the Sino-British Joint Declaration for an independence referendum. Indeed it explicitly states "The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region will be directly under the authority of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China". There is no constitutional way for Hong Kong to become independent (except through ...


13

A short answer would be that many of the lifestyles differ a lot from mainland China and there are also many others historical, cultural, economic and legal differences. Hong Kong and Macau both have more of a capitalist system while China has a socialist system at that time. Since both territories are quite well-developed than the mainland at that time, it'...


13

Thatcher surrendered all of Hong Kong -- not just the portions that were leased from China -- because the mainland Chinese had made it clear that Hong Kong was completely indefensible against an attack from the mainland. Taiwan would not be in any better of a position to defend Hong Kong. The United States' commitment to defending Taiwan is not a blank ...


13

Different Styles of Political Conflict The world is full of countries which dislike each their respective leadership. Many even trade while they dislike each other. Countries have various means at their disposal, from delivering a diplomatic note to calling the foreign ambassador in to receive a protest, ultimately all the way to breaking diplomatic ...


11

Nothing would happen. The UK is no longer in a position to threaten a country like China in any way besides some diplomatic grunting, which is very easy to ignore. They couldn't even sanction China properly as this would have massive consequences for their economy, similar to how even the smallest tariff increase on Chinese goods by the US has the potential ...


10

The correct term for a service voluntarily removing content from its own site is moderation. Some form of moderation is basically essential if you want to run a communications service between humans, because otherwise the service will be drowned in spam. This was true in the days of USENET and it remains true now. It's impossible to remove all spam, but the ...


10

The US Right now, it has a policy, under Trump, of confrontation with China. Some of it is for good principled reasons, but a lot of it seems driven by internal politics. So it is not wrong to say that they are right to support HK, but assuming they are doing it out of innate goodness is wishful thinking. China Has a long-established history of ...


9

Protesters in Hong-Kong are not demanding for the proposed extradiction law to be modified. They are asking for the bill to be withdrawn altogether. After the protests has gained momentum and authorities may have handled them ineffectively, other demands have come to the fore. Most notably, demonstrators ask for the Chief Executive of the government of Hong-...


9

The reason "on the table" was that the UK had recognized the PRC as the sole legitimate government of China since 1950, so they couldn't have returned Hong Kong to the ROC legally. The practical concern was that China would likely just have taken Hong Kong by force in that case: Deng Xiaoping had threatened to do so in Sino-British talks; there was ...


8

The general way that extradition works is that the party requesting extradition (which I'll call China) goes to the entity that would do the extraditing (which I'll call Hong Kong) and demonstrates that a crime was committed. Note that this generally requires that the act be criminal in Hong Kong, not just China. Hong Kong could then evaluate that evidence ...


8

It is difficult to find particular causes without having access to views of insider sources but certain conditions and ambitions can be assumed to be adding to the restraint China is showing. Some of them are: Chinese economy has slowed down recently and trade war with the US is adding fuel into it. Given that HK is used as the global expansion platform ...


8

I think the current highest voted answer already answers the question, but I wanted to add one more small bit of context. The Journal of Democracy ran a section on China in the April edition this year (vol 30, no 2). There's one specific article that stands out about the impact Tiananmen has had on Xi. This paragraph in particular: But the CCP ...


8

In addition to Brian Z's answer, I found an older and less detailed poll, again run by YouGov, conducted on May 29th: This shows a rather large difference between the levels of support shown by Remainers & Leavers, but also a substantial amount of 'Don't know' responses compared to the survey in Brian's answer, suggesting opinions have changed somewhat ...


7

As a reporter writes in the NY Times: Independent polling isn’t allowed in China, so judging public attitudes toward Hong Kong is largely guesswork. The only effort I could find to quantify public opinion in Hong Kong about the protests was a survey of students. Nearly 40% expressed support.


7

In order to answer this properly, we have to explain what include these 50 years of autonomy. In the Sino-British Joint Declaration, governments arranged to make the partial political handover. To take an example: Hong Kong's people can choose their mayor but after the selection made by the Chinese Communist Party which select -always- people that answer ...


7

It's a bit too soon to be 100% sure on the details, but it looks closer to what we'd call mob / mafia violence. The perpetrators wearing white shirts were working for the triads, similar to the Mafia in the USA, or the Yakuza in Japan. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triad_(organized_crime) “I have strong reason to believe they were gangsters,” said ...


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