86

There is no single definition of terrorism that everyone agrees to. However, Involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that violate [... the] law; Appear to be intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; ... Is used in the USA. (Title 18, section 2331) So was it violent? Yes. Was it criminal? Yes, I don't see any ...


74

Other than the reasons of practicality mentioned, there is also the issue of international laws and treaties, specifically on the issue of "successor states." There definitely was some debate, as the situation in China is not considered a traditional succession of states scenario. But most legal scholars at the time agreed that the current "government in ...


42

It's true there is a clause stating extradition from Hong Kong to China cannot be based on political motives. However, there are worries the Chinese government would fabricate charges just to get dissidents over to China, as they have done or tried to do before. In general, it's very problematic to determine whether the charges are truly not political. ...


31

As a general rule, when I use the word terrorism, I mean it to involve a small group using terror to attack the general population. Under that kind of definition, it includes the Irish Republican Army and Daesh but excludes the Nazis in Germany or Sherman's March to the Sea. Here, we seem to have an official government (China's) using clandestine force ...


22

The key is that extradition hearings are not trials that establish innocence or guilt. From your quote, the requirement for extradition is that there is: sufficient prima facie evidence that there is a possible case To people who think that China is willing to occasionally forge evidence and hold mock trials, that is equivalent to "prolonged imprisonment ...


21

A YouGov poll just published today shows significant support across the political spectrum: The full results show that the level of support among Leavers (62%) is nearly as high as that among Stayers (70%). If that seems surprising it may be relevant that a study published last year found the following: Those who subscribe strongly to the Leave identity, ...


16

Sure. Everyone gets a perspective, so if, to you, that constitutes political censorship, then I can see how that argument gets made. But the flip side of that argument is true also. If the majority of those 200,000 accounts were bots meant to stifle speech from their political opponents, then the argument can be made that Twitter is trying to do something ...


15

There is no provision in the Sino-British Joint Declaration for an independence referendum. Indeed it explicitly states "The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region will be directly under the authority of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China". There is no constitutional way for Hong Kong to become independent (except through ...


15

The United Kingdom recognized the People's Republic of China on January 6, 1950. Therefore by the time of Thatcher's negotiations, she was obviously going to negotiate with the PRC instead of Taiwan.


13

Thatcher surrendered all of Hong Kong -- not just the portions that were leased from China -- because the mainland Chinese had made it clear that Hong Kong was completely indefensible against an attack from the mainland. Taiwan would not be in any better of a position to defend Hong Kong. The United States' commitment to defending Taiwan is not a blank ...


10

The correct term for a service voluntarily removing content from its own site is moderation. Some form of moderation is basically essential if you want to run a communications service between humans, because otherwise the service will be drowned in spam. This was true in the days of USENET and it remains true now. It's impossible to remove all spam, but the ...


10

The US Right now, it has a policy, under Trump, of confrontation with China. Some of it is for good principled reasons, but a lot of it seems driven by internal politics. So it is not wrong to say that they are right to support HK, but assuming they are doing it out of innate goodness is wishful thinking. China Has a long-established history of ...


9

Protesters in Hong-Kong are not demanding for the proposed extradiction law to be modified. They are asking for the bill to be withdrawn altogether. After the protests has gained momentum and authorities may have handled them ineffectively, other demands have come to the fore. Most notably, demonstrators ask for the Chief Executive of the government of Hong-...


9

The reason "on the table" was that the UK had recognized the PRC as the sole legitimate government of China since 1950, so they couldn't have returned Hong Kong to the ROC legally. The practical concern was that China would likely just have taken Hong Kong by force in that case: Deng Xiaoping had threatened to do so in Sino-British talks; there was ...


8

It is difficult to find particular causes without having access to views of insider sources but certain conditions and ambitions can be assumed to be adding to the restraint China is showing. Some of them are: Chinese economy has slowed down recently and trade war with the US is adding fuel into it. Given that HK is used as the global expansion platform ...


8

The general way that extradition works is that the party requesting extradition (which I'll call China) goes to the entity that would do the extraditing (which I'll call Hong Kong) and demonstrates that a crime was committed. Note that this generally requires that the act be criminal in Hong Kong, not just China. Hong Kong could then evaluate that evidence ...


8

I think the current highest voted answer already answers the question, but I wanted to add one more small bit of context. The Journal of Democracy ran a section on China in the April edition this year (vol 30, no 2). There's one specific article that stands out about the impact Tiananmen has had on Xi. This paragraph in particular: But the CCP ...


8

In addition to Brian Z's answer, I found an older and less detailed poll, again run by YouGov, conducted on May 29th: This shows a rather large difference between the levels of support shown by Remainers & Leavers, but also a substantial amount of 'Don't know' responses compared to the survey in Brian's answer, suggesting opinions have changed somewhat ...


7

As a reporter writes in the NY Times: Independent polling isn’t allowed in China, so judging public attitudes toward Hong Kong is largely guesswork. The only effort I could find to quantify public opinion in Hong Kong about the protests was a survey of students. Nearly 40% expressed support.


7

It's a bit too soon to be 100% sure on the details, but it looks closer to what we'd call mob / mafia violence. The perpetrators wearing white shirts were working for the triads, similar to the Mafia in the USA, or the Yakuza in Japan. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triad_(organized_crime) “I have strong reason to believe they were gangsters,” said ...


6

Pretty all definitions of terrorism I'm familiar with define terrorism as the action of the group taken against the government or the population on their own, or financed by foreign agents. Any actions initiated by the government, against own population, can be speculated to be legal measures to bring peace and prosperity, or oppressive actions, but no way ...


6

According to generally accepted principles of international law, no, Hong Kong has no right to self-determination. The current internationally accepted principle of international was established in 1998, when the Supreme Court of Canada considered the question of a region's right to secede unilaterally in the case Reference Re Secession of Quebec, [1998] 2 ...


6

By far, Hong Kong's judiciary seems mostly independent. Hong Kong's judiciary have ruled both for and against the government, and there is no clear political trend that can be observed from those rulings. Both the Hong Kong government and the Central People's Government's Hong Kong Liaison Office, as well as pan-democratic legislators and activists, have ...


6

TL;DR: By charging them under non-political charges (whether fabricated or real), of course. However, it is not clear to me that they would actually do so. Not playing devil's advocate here, but I would like to point out some finer details that people have not yet mentioned. The concern that politically motivated extradition may happen under the proposed ...


6

I suspect it has something to do with the level of pressure China can put on Canada, compared to how much Canada can fight back against that coercion. As a result of the arrest of the Huawei founder's daughter - a much less direct challenge than to support HK protesters - we have had severe trade disruptions, 2 citizens, one of which an ex-diplomat, jailed ...


6

As given by Wikipedia: Despite the finite nature of the New Territories lease, this portion of the colony was developed just as rapidly as, and became highly integrated with, the rest of Hong Kong. As the end of the lease approached, and by the time of serious negotiations over the future status of Hong Kong in the 1980s, it was thought impractical to ...


5

why wouldn't they allow Hong Kong to punish the people who committed illegal acts in China to be tried in Hong Kong under Hong Kong's laws and sent to a Hong Kong prison? The whole point of this is that all sorts of "political crimes" under Chinese law are legal in Hong Kong. If people were tried for these under HK law in HK they would be acquitted.


5

Wikipedia lists five demands with an added rationale. I will quote them here, as those seem to be the the concerns of the protesters. Combined with the rationale, it seems neither of those have been addressed yet. From Wikipedia: Permanent withdrawal of the extradition bill While suspended on 15 June, the bill could be resurrected with its ...


5

By the 1980s China had land-based ICBMs, such as the DF-5 capable of reaching London. So threatening China with nuclear weapons would not have been productive for the UK unless the US had been willing to partake in the threat with its own massive arsenal. The UK did consider convincing the US to use nuclear weapons against China some decades prior, and in ...


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