New answers tagged

2

YES you can be prosecuted. BUT you are largely safe if you limit yourself to go to places that have no extradition arrangements with China or Hong Kong, or those places that will likely reject a extradition request. Countries are perfectly allowed to prosecute slander, seditious speech, or lese-majeste, wherever they’re committed. A good example is Saudi ...


22

This reflects similar situations applicable wrt other nations. A person wanted by the US authorities flew on a Canada-Mexico flight across the US. The aircraft was instructed to land en-route in the US and the passenger was removed. Israeli nationals who have any concern that they may be legally detained by countries who have extradition treaties with their &...


16

Countries do this all the time. Sometimes, they will claim universal jurisdiction for crimes they consider particularly heinous or crucial to their national security (think Julian Assange). Many jurisdiction will prosecute crimes like defamation based on the victim's location (the perpetrator's might not even be known initially). Some countries get some ...


34

It is quite common for countries to prosecute both actions by and against their nationals as soon as the perpetrator enters their jurisdiction. Some will also prosecute certain crimes by anyone who is presently in their jurisdiction, no matter where they happened. Some key points to take away: For some crimes (a citizen of country A murders a citizen of ...


60

How far applicable the law of a country is is decided by the law of that country. If other countries disagree, they can obviously decline to assist in the enforcement of those laws, and disallow the agents of the first country to act on their territory. There even is precedent that a country outlaws behaviour not related to it at all. For example, German law ...


3

Britain has taken action, but its options are limited by China's determination to assert greater control over Hong Kong. There is a strong political consensus in Britain across the political spectrum that China should respect its earlier commitment to "one country, two systems". In response, Boris Johnson has made it easier for Hong Kong citizens ...


0

To add to bytebuster's answer, it seems that even China scholars fail to see a specific reason for timing, besides the obvious taking advantage of the pandemic crisis. The CCP surely knew there would be repercussions of the likes of US removing special status to Hong Kong, but the current situation might allow Chinese government and businesses to compensate ...


2

This question comes from an assumption that Chinese government acts on its own free will, "not needing anyone's permission". In fact, China is (and was, one year ago, and will be, 27 years after today) bound by its Constitutional principle colloquially known as "One country, two systems" introduced by Deng Xiaoping. This principle is ...


6

This move is akin to saying that any citizen of Hong Kong has the right to claim refuge from the Chinese government. Of course they're not calling the people actual refugees as that would involve lots more international law (and the Australian government doesn't have a good relationship with refugees in general...) but the insult is the same: Australia and ...


1

The Brexit Party is currently (12 July 2020) polling its members to ask about this With regard to the 3,000,000 citizens of Hong Kong (British National (Overseas) passport holders and dependants thereof), who have been offered rights to come to the UK, do you believe that: a.They should be given total rights to come and live and settle here b.The current ...


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