23

Most1 800-odd of the holders of hereditary peerages currently have three routes by which they might sit in the House of Lords: Be granted a Life Peerage. This has been done a number of times, for former Leaders of the House of Lords, for "hereditary Peers of first creation" and, possibly, some others.2 Become a (senior) Church of England bishop. Be elected ...


23

Denis has given the formal answer, but there is also a political reason why the House of Lords will not block a deal. The House of Lords is unelected, and the Lords are aware that the existence of their institution is controversial. If, after years of Brexit drama, the House of Commons were to finally pass a Withdrawal Agreement, only to be rejected by the ...


15

It must. And the House of Commons can basically overrule the House of Lords if the latter gets in its way. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Lords#Legislative_functions The House of Lords debates legislation, and has power to amend or reject bills. However, the power of the Lords to reject a bill passed by the House of Commons is severely restricted ...


8

The House of Lords act 1999, which is what I assume you are referring to, specifies that there will be 92 hereditary seats in the House of Lords. The Lords were also given the opportunity to choose which 90 peers kept their hereditary seats. Wikipedia has an article spelling out how many of these 90 elected seats were allocated to each party, and a list ...


6

Did the 2017 manifesto represent an actual change in policy from 2015? Yes. In the absence of a clear manifesto commitment to a policy, it is harder for Labour to claim it has an electoral mandate to implement it. Most importantly, under the Salisbury Convention the Lords does not block legislation which would enact a manifesto commitment. Why did ...


6

I wasn’t able to find any modern examples of opposition party members “switching sides” after being nominated for a peerage, but I am aware of one relevant example; In Theresa May’s resignation honours in September 2019, the Labour MP for Bassetlaw John Mann was nominated for a peerage. This was seen by many as a bribe or reward for Mann having supported ...


6

It looks like the Tories in the House of Lords had a different (and arguably important) reason for the filibuster, and it wasn't something decided by Boris or Tory MPs. It wasn't the case that they didn't want the new law to pass, but rather, they were opposed to the guillotine motion Baroness Smith of Basildon (Labour) wanted to introduce to make sure the ...


5

This website shows the House of Lords membership by party and genders of the Members over the last 30 years. View the makeup of the House of Lords showing the party and genders of the Members at any specified date over the last 30 years.


5

All those who have the right to sit and vote in the House of Lords have the same rights and privileges, and yes, they do use them. To take an example which is topical at the time of writing, this division (vote) on an amendment to the Brexit bill included both bishops and hereditary peers. The bishops are not associated with any political party, and we can ...


5

No, they don't sit year round. Helpfully both the House of Commons and House of Lords each have a web page where they publish their recess dates. The Commons page is at http://www.parliament.uk/about/faqs/house-of-commons-faqs/business-faq-page/recess-dates/ and the Lords page is at http://www.parliament.uk/about/faqs/house-of-lords-faqs/lords-recess-dates/ ...


5

Is the House of Lords being used as a procedural tool by the Executive, so that “originating in the House of Lords” is not what it at first seems (ie a Lord proposing a Bill that becomes an Act)? Sort of. Acts of Parliament (apart from money bills) can be introduced in either house, and for the most part, there is no particular significance to where a bill ...


4

It is very common for a Commons debate to get as rowdy as it did yesterday, but it is very rare indeed in the Lords. There is a Lord Speaker, but their role is more administrative and advisory in nature. Their Lordships have not had much of a need to give the Lord Speaker much more power than that, because Their Lordships have, as a whole, been able to ...


3

Apparently Ms. May promised a meaningful vote to some of her MPs, but then immediately reneged on it. The Lords are giving those MPs another opportunity to hold May to her word, or to rebel if she refuses. Essentially the Lords are saying that the government has not fully dealt with this matter and must re-consider it in light of these events. On a more ...


3

No, legislative bodies typically don't meet year-round, at least not in the US. There are recess periods built in to the calendar, during which members are able to both take vacations and go to their home districts. The longest break Congress has is a month-long recess in the month of August, but there are other scattered recesses throughout the year. When ...


2

According to Parliament UK the Lords can delay a bill for a year, not a number of times of being bounced between the houses. Parliament Act 1949 The Parliament Act 1949 further reduced the Lords' delaying powers to one year. This is probably related to the rules that prevent the House of Commons from re-introducing a unchanged bill in the same session ...


2

No. Only the House of Commons needs to agree the deal. The Lords has to debate it, but does not have to vote in favour of it. The Brexit deal is not legislation, it is an international treaty between the UK and the EU. Therefore the process for bills is irrelevant. That said, following the Brexit deal (if any) there will be legislation needed in order to ...


2

Yes. As noted here: Bills are introduced in either the House of Commons or House of Lords for examination, discussion and amendment. Although most government bills are introduced in the House of Commons (HoC), parliamentary time is a scarce resource, and for reasons of scheduling bills are sometimes introduced in the House of Lords (HoL) instead. The ...


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