118

The majority party in the House of Representatives gets to appoint the Chairman of every sub-committee in the House, there are many of these. These chairmen are all Republicans, but will soon all be Democrats, every one of them. The ruling party needs no excuse to replace them, and all chairmen are always appointed from the ruling party. Each of these ...


90

According to House practices, a select committee is a committee whose members are appointed (selected) by the Speaker. Conventionally the Speaker will receive recommendations from the minority leader and appoint those members, on the presumption that the minority leader knows best which members of their caucus are useful and appropriate for the subject the ...


82

My naive understanding (correct me if I'm wrong) is that the Constitution is already the supreme law and nothing can be above it, nor Congress Resolutions. If anyone acts against the Constitution, it must be already illegal. On the other hand, if someone is able to break the higher law and get away with it, he could also safely ignore common law. In the ...


70

The US house (and other systems) allows for expedited voting via "unanimous consent" - without a proper vote where each member's position is noted, the Speaker simply asks for a voice vote and motions to pass with unanimous consent (which does not mean everyone votes "yes" but rather that anyone who would vote "no" effectively acknowledges that there are ...


62

Polling data -- which is what is being analyzed by organizations like FiveThirtyEight -- indicates that Democrats are likely to win a majority in the House of Representatives. Polling data is the best and most objective way to predict the outcome. However, there is no certainty. FiveThirtyEight gives Republicans a >12% chance of keeping the House. That's ...


60

The State of the Union speech is purely a tradition. There are no laws regarding it, although there may be rules within each house of Congress that address it. The only requirement is specified in the Constitution (Article II, Section 3): [The president] shall from time to time give to Congress information of the State of the Union and recommend to ...


60

why the House of Representatives needed to pass a resolution to condemn Trump's tweets? It did not need to. It wanted1 to. Many people in government have criticized Trump's tweets before [...]. For example, [...] Elizabeth Warren quickly condemned his tweets A single representative by him/herself has no power. All of their power is to vote to get ...


60

Because four were completely irrelevant to the question at hand, two were superfluous, and two actually did testify. Let's go through the list for fun. Hunter Biden. It would stretch credibility that Trump or one of his cohorts would have directly informed Hunter Biden that they were attempting to determine what criminal activity he did. You don't tell ...


60

There's a minor mischaracterization in the question: McCarthy wasn't the one who characterized this action as unprecedented – Pelosi herself did in her official statement: “With respect for the integrity of the investigation, with an insistence on the truth and with concern about statements made and actions taken by these Members, I must reject the ...


59

The founders had two models in particularly in mind: the Ancient Roman Senate, and the UK parliament of Monarch/Lords/Commons. In the UK, the House of Lords functioned as a Supreme Court. The founders wanted to separate the powers of the court from the Upper house, but they still wanted the upper house to have a role in approving justices. The expectation ...


51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


50

I rather liked Byron York's piece, in the Washington examiner, on it Cheney's current problems intensified after the first vote on her leadership, when she intensified her campaign against Trump. Cheney's efforts were undoubtedly media-friendly — she was portrayed as a profile in courage by some media outlets — but many Republicans came to believe, with ...


45

His current term to the US House has not ended yet; it ends on January 3, 2019, which is the start of the next Congress. This is mandated in the 20th Amendment to the United States Constitution. Section 1. ..., and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article ...


42

Southern Democrats In 1972, most southern states were overwhelmingly Democrat. But these Southern Democrats had a different ideology than Northern Democrats. They were more conservative, particularly on moral issues (e.g. sex outside marriage and abortion bad). Democratic presidential candidates tended to have Northern Democratic ideologies. As a result,...


42

Washington Post: Who is Bill Taylor, and why does his public testimony matter in the impeachment inquiry? In brief, the Washington Post lays out his pertinence as follows. As the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, he had a unique vantage point: Key figures in pushing Trump’s Ukraine policy were open with Taylor as they tried to get Ukraine to do Trump’s ...


41

This is explicitly stated in US tax law. From 26 U.S. Code § 6103. Confidentiality and disclosure of returns and return information: (f) Disclosure to Committees of Congress (1) Committee on Ways and Means, Committee on Finance, and Joint Committee on Taxation Upon written request from the chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means of the ...


39

What's to stop the House majority party from voting to expel every member of the House minority party from committees? That might work for a few months as most committees and subcommittees are not permanent. It might even work for two years if the majority party continued to expel every minority party member from their assigned committees. But then the ...


38

It depends on how exactly you count. For example, not contesting a seat because you are running for Governor is not really "retiring", nor is losing your primary. Among those not contesting their seats, "FiveThirtyEight" counts 26 pure Republican retirements and 8 Democrats. This is higher than average and obviously skewed but not truly exceptional. In ...


33

This is a difficult question to answer because there's not easily accessible data on representatives who attempted to become senators but failed. So what I did was test whether the median income for the former districts of senators who used to be representatives [1,2] (n=47) in the current Congress was higher than the average median income for the other ...


31

As the answers in Does the US require a House vote to begin an impeachment inquiry? point out, House rules never required a vote to start an impeachment inquiry. In both previous impeachments, however, the House did pass an inquiry resolution in order to give themselves additional subpoena power in order to better carry out the inquiry. This is not ...


30

Article of impeachment If there is evidence that the president is hindering the investigation into his own conduct then the House of Representatives could write and article of impeachment on that. Another answer by PoloHoleSet goes into more detail quoting the chair of the House Intelligence Committee stating that discouraging witnesses to appear and the ...


30

See congressional apportionment... Mathematically speaking this is a difficult question to address (similar to the knapsack problem) because one is trying to get a 'best fit' between a near-continuous variable — population percentage — and a fixed integer number of seats with a lower limit of one membership per state. But in simplest terms, New York did not ...


28

Can the US House/Congress impeach/convict a private citizen that hasn't held office? No. Only those individuals identified as shown below. A person who has never held such office cannot be impeached, Article II, Section 4: Offices Eligible for Impeachment The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from ...


27

Under normal procedures, a bill in the House or Senate would work its way through various committees (which work on their own schedules and have their own priorities), and then go through preliminary debates and qualifying votes before being brought up for the actual vote. It's a time-consuming process, but one that gives ample space for deliberation, ...


26

Explicit consequences of the Democrats taking the House: All new laws passed for the next 2 years will require the acquiescence of the Democratic Leadership of the House to get moved on, and at least some Democrats supporting them. All House congressional committees will now have a majority of Democrats on them. Republicans will no longer be able to block ...


25

The framers didn't trust democracy or the people (at the federal level) A shocking sentiment to many, perhaps, but a fact nonetheless. They often saw direct democracy on any given matter as either too onerous a burden on the people (believing they should put in great diligence to exercise the power wisely, but fearing they wouldn't due to lack of time and ...


25

I think any answer to this is going to involve some level of speculation — clearly no one involved (aside from Cheney herself) wants to discuss the issue openly — but I think I can point at some obvious constraints on the GOP in this moment. The GOP is in a bind: They cannot explicitly contradict Trump's fake 'election fraud' narrative without suffering a ...


24

but does he actually have any information that is helpful? New events came to light today: Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, revealed for the first time that his staff members overheard President Donald Trump speaking on the phone to another diplomat about investigations. Taylor, as the acting ambassador to Ukraine, would be aware of how formal ...


24

We can calculate this using the Daily Kos 'Pres-by-CD' dataset. This answer is based in part on code used in my answer to this related question about the number of split districts in 2020, which also uses the NYT feed to determine the winners of each congressional district. Unfortunately, their main dataset found here only reports percentage totals rather ...


23

Reuters has a bit of background: In 1924, Congress awarded itself the power to obtain tax returns. Previously only the president could disclose them. The change came during a bribery scandal involving federal officials and Wyoming oil field leases known as the Teapot Dome scandal. The law was crafted in part to help Congress investigate wealthy ...


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