90

According to House practices, a select committee is a committee whose members are appointed (selected) by the Speaker. Conventionally the Speaker will receive recommendations from the minority leader and appoint those members, on the presumption that the minority leader knows best which members of their caucus are useful and appropriate for the subject the ...


82

My naive understanding (correct me if I'm wrong) is that the Constitution is already the supreme law and nothing can be above it, nor Congress Resolutions. If anyone acts against the Constitution, it must be already illegal. On the other hand, if someone is able to break the higher law and get away with it, he could also safely ignore common law. In the ...


60

There's a minor mischaracterization in the question: McCarthy wasn't the one who characterized this action as unprecedented – Pelosi herself did in her official statement: “With respect for the integrity of the investigation, with an insistence on the truth and with concern about statements made and actions taken by these Members, I must reject the ...


59

The founders had two models in particularly in mind: the Ancient Roman Senate, and the UK parliament of Monarch/Lords/Commons. In the UK, the House of Lords functioned as a Supreme Court. The founders wanted to separate the powers of the court from the Upper house, but they still wanted the upper house to have a role in approving justices. The expectation ...


51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


50

I rather liked Byron York's piece, in the Washington examiner, on it Cheney's current problems intensified after the first vote on her leadership, when she intensified her campaign against Trump. Cheney's efforts were undoubtedly media-friendly — she was portrayed as a profile in courage by some media outlets — but many Republicans came to believe, with ...


39

What's to stop the House majority party from voting to expel every member of the House minority party from committees? That might work for a few months as most committees and subcommittees are not permanent. It might even work for two years if the majority party continued to expel every minority party member from their assigned committees. But then the ...


33

This is a difficult question to answer because there's not easily accessible data on representatives who attempted to become senators but failed. So what I did was test whether the median income for the former districts of senators who used to be representatives [1,2] (n=47) in the current Congress was higher than the average median income for the other ...


30

See congressional apportionment... Mathematically speaking this is a difficult question to address (similar to the knapsack problem) because one is trying to get a 'best fit' between a near-continuous variable — population percentage — and a fixed integer number of seats with a lower limit of one membership per state. But in simplest terms, New York did not ...


28

Can the US House/Congress impeach/convict a private citizen that hasn't held office? No. Only those individuals identified as shown below. A person who has never held such office cannot be impeached, Article II, Section 4: Offices Eligible for Impeachment The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from ...


27

Under normal procedures, a bill in the House or Senate would work its way through various committees (which work on their own schedules and have their own priorities), and then go through preliminary debates and qualifying votes before being brought up for the actual vote. It's a time-consuming process, but one that gives ample space for deliberation, ...


25

The framers didn't trust democracy or the people (at the federal level) A shocking sentiment to many, perhaps, but a fact nonetheless. They often saw direct democracy on any given matter as either too onerous a burden on the people (believing they should put in great diligence to exercise the power wisely, but fearing they wouldn't due to lack of time and ...


25

I think any answer to this is going to involve some level of speculation — clearly no one involved (aside from Cheney herself) wants to discuss the issue openly — but I think I can point at some obvious constraints on the GOP in this moment. The GOP is in a bind: They cannot explicitly contradict Trump's fake 'election fraud' narrative without suffering a ...


24

We can calculate this using the Daily Kos 'Pres-by-CD' dataset. This answer is based in part on code used in my answer to this related question about the number of split districts in 2020, which also uses the NYT feed to determine the winners of each congressional district. Unfortunately, their main dataset found here only reports percentage totals rather ...


23

They are already Representatives before they take the oath. The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, ... ...the terms of Senators and Representatives [end] at noon on the 3d day of January, ... and the terms of their successors shall then begin. There is nothing in Section 1 ...


20

For the most part — and note that the actual procedures vary from committee to committee — committee membership is divided between the majority and minority parties by formula. The upshot is that removing a member of one party from committees doesn't give any particular advantage to the other party; new committee members will be selected by the leader of the ...


20

If a congress person is censured and removed from their current committee assignments, can they later be assigned to different committees in the same congress? Yes. All committee assignments are made by a resolution in the respective chamber. The resolution assigning Rep. Greene to the two committees, from which she was removed, was H.Res.63. Should a ...


18

Yes, they can do this as a disciplinary measure against any of its members. It is just a standard procedure to help keep discipline and order in the chambers. https://www.everycrsreport.com/reports/RL31382.html The House of Representatives—in the same manner as the United States Senate—is expressly authorized within the United States Constitution (Article I,...


18

Just to add to the answers given by others, any attempt to punish a private citizen by the legislature would almost certainly be an unconstitutional bill of attainder prohibited in federal law under Article I, Section 9, and in state law under Article I, Section 10.


18

The California Citizens Redistricting Commission is responsible for redrawing the districts for representatives to Congress. Following the 2010 passage of California Proposition 20, the Voters First Act for Congress, the Commission was also assigned the responsibility of redrawing the state's U.S. congressional district boundaries following the ...


17

It is mostly a statement. When Congress does something, it is generally reported in the news. Congress passing declarations like this is a way for the members of Congress to make a big deal about an opinion the governing party holds very strongly. By formalizing this opinion (even an opinion as basic as "The Constitution exists"), they are able to ...


17

The existing answers are good, but I think they miss one element of why the Senate performs this function and not the House: Senators were originally appointed by state governments. The scope of federal law was originally quite slight, and a substantial amount of federal court business was naturally anticipated to deal with disputes between states. Having ...


16

Let's look at the last post-redistricting election (2012). There were ten states that lost House seats from the previous election. New York (-2 seats) took advantage of the fact that multiple incumbents were retiring to eliminate two districts, one from each party. Ohio (-2 seats) put two incumbent Democrats against each other in one district, and two ...


14

The House of Representatives has the constitutional authority to impose disciplinary measures on its members, including "expulsion, censure or reprimand, fines or other economic sanctions, and deprivation of seniority or committee status". Article I, Section 5, Clause 2 of the US Constitution states: Each House may determine the Rules of its ...


14

Generally, yes. Even when a state keeps the same number of congressional districts, people might have moved around the state. Districts have to all be approximately equal in population, so when the new census figures come out the state has to make sure that they're still approximately equal. If they're not, the state has to change them so they are.


13

But I was wondering if there were specific rules and laws about this which stops such an event happening. There is not, and cannot be, a law which binds the House on this. After all, the Constitution says: Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings and a law would have to be passed by the Senate and possibly the President. This would mean other ...


12

To counter your intuition, an expensive House race costs about $2 million, whereas a Senate race is closer to $10 million. Maybe a candidate from a wealthier district has $1.5 million more in their campaign chest than one from a poor one. But that's not all that much compared to the $10 million they now need to raise. Another thing is that not all of your ...


10

The House and the senate can set their own rules. There is nothing in the Constitution about non-voting representatives in the House or the Senate. The Puerto Rican delegates are there at the invite of the House. The House is intended to represent the people/citizens of states of the USA. It is a small step to also wanting to represent citizens of the USA ...


9

No, the one vote per state rule comes from the 12th Amendment and could only be replaced or superseded by a new constitutional Amendment. See the bolded portion of the Amendment below: ... if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of ...


9

Do the Constitution and applicable federal laws allow states to elect representatives in this manner? The text of the Constitution is silent on the issue, though Justices on the Supreme Court have disagreed on that point (see below). However, ArtI.S2.C1.2, Electors for the House, presents a possible Constitutional problem with the proposed scheme, in that, &...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible