60

Because four were completely irrelevant to the question at hand, two were superfluous, and two actually did testify. Let's go through the list for fun. Hunter Biden. It would stretch credibility that Trump or one of his cohorts would have directly informed Hunter Biden that they were attempting to determine what criminal activity he did. You don't tell ...


58

The founders had two models in particularly in mind: the Ancient Roman Senate, and the UK parliament of Monarch/Lords/Commons. In the UK, the House of Lords functioned as a Supreme Court. The founders wanted to separate the powers of the court from the Upper house, but they still wanted the upper house to have a role in approving justices. The expectation ...


51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


41

Washington Post: Who is Bill Taylor, and why does his public testimony matter in the impeachment inquiry? In brief, the Washington Post lays out his pertinence as follows. As the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, he had a unique vantage point: Key figures in pushing Trump’s Ukraine policy were open with Taylor as they tried to get Ukraine to do Trump’s ...


31

As the answers in Does the US require a House vote to begin an impeachment inquiry? point out, House rules never required a vote to start an impeachment inquiry. In both previous impeachments, however, the House did pass an inquiry resolution in order to give themselves additional subpoena power in order to better carry out the inquiry. This is not ...


29

Article of impeachment If there is evidence that the president is hindering the investigation into his own conduct then the House of Representatives could write and article of impeachment on that. Another answer by PoloHoleSet goes into more detail quoting the chair of the House Intelligence Committee stating that discouraging witnesses to appear and the ...


24

Because the current perception is that both sides see more advantages to being able to campaign on what they'd do if only the voters would hand them control of the House, Senate, and Presidency than they do in compromising and campaigning on the fact that they got something done. If no bill passes, Democrats can campaign on the need to overhaul policing and ...


24

The framers didn't trust democracy or the people (at the federal level) A shocking sentiment to many, perhaps, but a fact nonetheless. They often saw direct democracy on any given matter as either too onerous a burden on the people (believing they should put in great diligence to exercise the power wisely, but fearing they wouldn't due to lack of time and ...


23

It actually changes quite a few things. None would be make or break, but they address talking points and bring formality. According to electoral-vote.com/'s summation: It will give the investigation a bit more formality, and thus a stronger legal footing It will allow many future hearings to be public, rather than behind closed doors It authorizes the ...


23

but does he actually have any information that is helpful? New events came to light today: Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, revealed for the first time that his staff members overheard President Donald Trump speaking on the phone to another diplomat about investigations. Taylor, as the acting ambassador to Ukraine, would be aware of how formal ...


15

The existing answers are good, but I think they miss one element of why the Senate performs this function and not the House: Senators were originally appointed by state governments. The scope of federal law was originally quite slight, and a substantial amount of federal court business was naturally anticipated to deal with disputes between states. Having ...


14

No, this has never happened before. The election with the fewest number of states which returned a different overall party winner, in terms of the state-aggregated vote count, was the 1888 Presidential Election, where only New Jersey voted differently - the state cast 98,562 votes for Democrat candidates compared to 105,468 for Republican candidates in the ...


13

In the normal process of things, Congress would refer to this as 'criminal contempt' and refer the matter to the Department of Justice for the Attorney General to prosecute those who had defied subpoenas, with the end result being fines and jail time for those who violated the subpoena. Unfortunately, given William Barr's behavior towards obstructing the ...


12

Correct, the committees were already performing investigations. The title of the bill, HR 660 even says "Directing certain committees to continue their ongoing investigations" (full text) WaPo summarizes that this allows televised hearings: The House’s resolution clears the way for nationally televised hearings as Democrats look to make their case ...


12

A tiny bit more detail from ABC: The GOP minority does not have subpoena power, much to their chagrin, although Republicans changed the playbook in 2015 when they rewrote rules delegating subpoena power to individual chairmen without full approval from the House of Representatives. Democrats reaffirmed that process earlier this year, adopting ...


12

Trying to answer the question from the viewpoint of a scientist, not a member of the administration, but I think the logic is similar, as it is about technical reports. The dense language in each report leaves people prone to misinterpreting the meaning of certain words. What you call dense language is actually technical language. It is necessary to have ...


11

Update: It seems that Pelosi has decided to go ahead with a resolution after all. The resolution will be introduced on Tuesday 10/29/19 and will be voted on by the full House on Thursday 10/31/19: “This resolution establishes the procedure for hearings that are open to the American people, authorizes the disclosure of deposition transcripts, outlines ...


10

The expectation yesterday was that the Judiciary Committee was going to wrap up the vote that evening. The House Calendar showed no planned events for today, and many members had apparently had other plans. Quoting Doug Collins (ranking Republican member) from two different sources here Fox News "Mr. Chairman, there was no consulting with the ranking ...


9

What are the details of how this problem of properly convening the house is resolved? RULES of the HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES RULE II OTHER OFFICERS AND OFFICIALS Clerk 2. (a) At the commencement of the first session of each Congress, the Clerk shall call the Members, Delegates, and Resident Commissioner to order and proceed to record their ...


9

No, the one vote per state rule comes from the 12th Amendment and could only be replaced or superseded by a new constitutional Amendment. See the bolded portion of the Amendment below: ... if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of ...


8

Possibly nothing. On today's NPR program "Here and Now" they interviewed Lisa Kern Griffin, a Duke University law professor and former prosecutor. She explained that even though the White House has no legal grounds to block the impeachment inquiry, they can simply drag this battle on almost indefinitely. They can parry practically any thrust by the House ...


8

This is an interesting question - it depends by what metric you measure efficiency. I've looked at it by classifying a 'redundant' vote as a vote cast in excess of the amount required to win the state. For example, in 2016, the Democrats won 8,753,788 votes in California compared to the Republican's 4,483,810. This would result in 4,269,978 redundant votes. ...


7

Policy Window of Opportunity As a general rule, if controversial legislation is going to be passed, it is much more likely to happen very soon after the event than much later. This is to complement @JustinCave excellent answer which focuses on the proximity of the upcoming election. As they say, one of the primary reasons for skepticism is that it is ...


6

Formally, the House is dissolved by Royal Decision (Koninklijk Besluit), which effectively means by cabinet decision. No vote is needed in the House. (Constitution, Art 64) There are also exceptional grounds; the House is also dissolved as part of a constitutional change or if the King would die without a successor.


6

I think divibisan covered most of it. His points are reflected in a few more quotes from Democratic representatives quoted by a Politico article; alas none are from Pelosi herself. However, that article also raises an interesting point/reminder: In the past, when judges have suggested the House should take a vote, Pelosi has responded by doing just that, ...


6

Can a House committee member who is willfully disrupting a hearing be ejected? With regard to the RULES OF PROCEDURE for the Committee on the Judiciary, there is no specific rule that allows removal of a member who is willfully disrupting a hearing. With regard to the Rules of the House of Representatives, p 778, on Decorum and Debate, Call to order, RULE ...


6

The House chose not to go down the route of judicial enforcement of their subpoenas after President Trump told staff not to honour them. Instead they added this denial of congressional oversight to the impeachment charges of obstruction. Pushing enforcement of subpoenas through the courts could take months and Pelosi has said this is much too long to wait ...


6

No The Constitution is clear that all bills must by passed by the House and the Senate. Here's the relevant excerpt from Article 1, Section 7: Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the President of the United States Because of the rules of the Senate, a bill that has ...


5

Why does the voting continue far beyond this time limit? Emboldened is quoted text, below. House Voting Procedures: Forms and Requirements, Updated February 6, 2019, p 3. Length of Time for Voting Under Rule XX, clause 2(a), the minimum time for a vote by electronic device is 15 minutes in either the House or the Committee of the Whole. The 15-minute ...


5

Trump could provoke more whistleblowers to come forward with damaging information. The people working for the executive branch swore an oath to serve the nation, not the person holding office. If they see the president continuing to flout the authority of Congress, they may simply decide that enough is enough and bring up yet more hidden information. If ...


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