51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


22

Apparently that's a common (in government/Washington DC, anyway) scheduling acronym which stands for "remain overnight." The globe-trotting secretary of state and globe-trotting former president each kept up frantic travel schedules, which meant they were often not in the same place at the same time — or even on the same continent. The calendars indicate ...


16

With plenty of caveats, the speaker of the house is who schedules legislation for a vote This is not accurate. The House Rules Committee handles this, not the Speaker of the House by himself or herself. But, since the House Rules Committee is also controlled by the majority party, the incentives are more or less identical. There has been no formal ...


12

As far as I'm aware, there is not explicit rule one way or the other - just tradition and the assumption about what words like "quorum" and "absent" mean. Constitutionally, this falls under the "Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings" catchall. It does require a "quorum" to do business, and "absent" members can be compelled to attend, both of ...


9

No. Their specific branch of Congress may expel the Congressman for any reason with a super-majority vote, which basically telling the people whom he represents, "Try again." There may be provisions to recall a Representative through recount. Before the 17th Amendment, Senators could be recalled by the State Legislature for reasons that they didn't like ...


9

What are the details of how this problem of properly convening the house is resolved? RULES of the HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES RULE II OTHER OFFICERS AND OFFICIALS Clerk 2. (a) At the commencement of the first session of each Congress, the Clerk shall call the Members, Delegates, and Resident Commissioner to order and proceed to record their ...


6

No The Constitution is clear that all bills must by passed by the House and the Senate. Here's the relevant excerpt from Article 1, Section 7: Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the President of the United States Because of the rules of the Senate, a bill that has ...


5

Are there any other mechanisms of power? Yes. For example, the Rules committee can classify a bill into categories. Appropriations bills, for example, are subject to different rules than general legislation. As another example, the Rules committee determines whether a bill fits in a category that requires a supermajority vote under the House Rules (e.g. ...


4

No, this is not a power that is given to the house and it was setup so that the house, senate and president all need to agree with the exception that if the president does exercise veto power it can be overridden with a 2/3rd vote in both the house and senate. Something to remember, though not directly related, is that in the 1990's congress tried to give ...


4

The latter question, on convening a new congress with all officers unavailable, is very untested. Especially in the near-doomsday scenario where the government is essentially wiped out at the same time (including the "designated survivor" etc.). The issue of how and on what authorities each new Congress is convened in a formal legal sense is ...


4

This is from the Schenectady NY Gazette, printed on January 5th, 1955, two days after the 84th Congress began. RAYBURN, who arrived here from Bonham, Txas, on March 4, 1913, took the oath from Representative Carl Vinson (D), who came here from Milledgeville, Ga., on Nov. 3, 1914. ~* According to Vinson's Wikipedia page, Vinson was the second ...


3

Actually your answer is incorrect. Senators can be impeached -- and have been impeached. The first (and as of now, only) senator to be impeached was William Blount in 1798. Per Article II, Section 4, of the Constitution, the House of Representatives has the power to impeach the president, vice president and any civil officer (which includes senators and ...


2

No. The constitution gives the House the right to arrange its own affairs. The parliamentarian advises, but it is up to the House to decide, by voting if necessary. In this case, the House has made its decision. The House has decided that, regardless of the parliamentarian's advice and the precedent from 1984, the language was not unparliamentary. There is ...


2

At the end of the first roll call "THE SPEAKER: THE READING CLERK WILL NOW CALL THE NAMES OF MEMBERS WHO DID NOT ANSWER ON THE FIRST CALL" After the second attempt "THE SPEAKER: IF THERE ARE ANY MEMBERS WHO DID NOT ANSWER THE CALL OF THE ROLL, THEY MAY COME TO THE WELL AND VOTE AT THIS TIME." So they can still answer the call of the roll until the vote ...


2

Is there any rule making representatives, senators, and others purposefully avoid cursing while in the legislature building? [While the following applies to the House, it should be no different for the Senate.] No, there is no specific rule regarding words to be avoided. "Members have been cautioned against the use of vulgarity or profanity in debate.&...


1

Most parliaments have some concept of unparliamentary language. These are words that are seen as inadequate for the civil debate that should be going on therein. While it is expected that debates are heated, it is also recognised that a shouting duel or insults thrown back and forth will not further the debate, improve the arguments or lead to any common ...


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