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5

International law generally assumes that sovereign states have relationships and treaties. That's the concept of Westphalian Sovereignty, named after the negotiations to end the 30 years' war. In recent times, various actors have pushed for limits to this sovereignty in the name of universal principles, notably the Responsibility to Protect. How these two ...


3

No, they won’t. Even if they had been wrong. Like we can see in Italy the spreading of the virus explodes if it isn’t stoped by rigorous isolation of the population like lock down, closing restaurants, factories, shops, keeping social distance. The number of beds the intensive care units is limited, the hospitals and the medical personal won’t be able to ...


4

The general answer to this, which applies in most democratic countries, is that governments are not legally responsible for "bad" decisions, whether made during a state of emergency or not. The main reasons for this are: Who is to say what is a "bad" decision? It's rarely obvious, even with 20/20 hindsight, and the general view is that the electorate is ...


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