113

One of the main reasons was that the President - even now, never mind in Founding Fathers' time - is not the "head of government", the way Prime Ministers are in Parliamentary systems. The President is the head of Executive Branch of government, and in Founders' time that branch had fairly little power, therefore there was far less possible impact and ...


108

No one has attempted to "rein in or remove the President" because he has not been found to have done anything illegal. These "politically motivated sackings" were not of elected officials or even people appointed by congress. They were political appointees in the executive branch, which the President is in charge of. Obama replaced ...


95

Please, understand me in a right way - I'm not position myself as pro-Trump/pro-democrat - it is inner deals of foreign country for me, like a chess party. But this is just interesting question, I think - as things start going fast. Given this, I’m going to take a step back here and look at a fundamental underlying question here: Does [anything at all] ...


92

This comment is coming from the same President who called lifelong Republican Robert Mueller "a Democrat" for investigating him. He doesn't use these words to mean what they mean. He consistently uses them as epithets to dehumanize anyone who doesn't support him. It is a cue for his in-group to consider these people 'outsiders' and 'nonbelievers'....


74

You wrote that you are an outside observer (I live in Europe) As a fellow European, I can somewhat relate. There is an important thing to consider, though: in the US, professional bureaucrats play a lot smaller role than in most European countries. Your profile page states that you are from the UK. In the UK, only the very top bureaucrats are political ...


72

No, from ABC News (in reference to Ambassador Bill Taylor and Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman; emphasis mine): Trump has repeatedly lambasted these officials sitting for depositions as “Never Trumpers” – he called the United States’ top diplomat in Ukraine, Bill Taylor, one, too – despite the fact that there’s no evidence they have political biases ...


67

Answer: During an impeachment trial, the Senate can "disqualify" an officeholder from holding any public office again, but that is a separate vote from their "removal". Article 1, Section 3, Clause 7 of the Constitution says (emphasis mine): Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to ...


66

'Why' questions are inherently difficult, often de-evolving to opinion-mongering. Unless someone in the White House tells us their reasoning explicitly, we could only guess. However, what we can say is that the White House and its supporters have consistently held that the Bidens and Burisma were involved in some unspecified form of corruption in the ...


66

No, and it is arguably prohibited by the Constitution. First, it specifies quite clearly what the punishment for impeachment can include. Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States; but the Party convicted shall ...


63

If I understand correctly, in the United States, charges are currently being brought against President Trump You understand incorrectly. It has been asserted that President Trump may have done those things that you mentioned, but he has not yet been charged with anything. There is no criminal proceeding currently taking place in Congress that will result ...


62

A president can be impeached as many times as the House would like. The House could impeach the president multiple times in the same term if they wanted to. They could impeach on the same charges each time if they wanted to. Impeachment isn't a criminal charge so things like double-jeopardy aren't a consideration. The only consideration is practical and ...


61

The benefits granted to former presidents are set out in the appropriately-named Former Presidents Act passed in 1958. This act entitles former presidents to a rate of pay equal to that of a head of an executive department for the rest of their life (paragraph a), office staff (paragraph b), office space (paragraph c), a spousal allowance after the former ...


54

Because the US Supreme Court does not have the authority to rule on whether an impeachment is constitutional. That power lies solely with the US Senate, as part Article I, Section 3 of the US Constitution: The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. It is worth remembering that the President is not the only position that is subject to ...


53

One is an expected form of power transfer, the other is not. In a parliamentary democracy, each representative has a mandate from their constituents, and only in aggregate can they form a government. If that government can't command a majority in the parliament, they basically can't govern, but someone else might be able to. Depending on the exact ...


51

Has Nancy Pelosi made any public statements about why she is not supporting a push for impeachment, or what line Trump would have to cross, before she would support it? On September 20, 2019, House Speaker Pelosi gave an interview to NPR, Pelosi Says Congress Should Pass New Laws So Sitting Presidents Can Be Indicted. But despite the growing chants among ...


50

In Walter L. Nixon v. United States (unrelated to President Richard Nixon), the court held that the judiciary could not review impeachment proceedings. According to the constitution, the House has the "sole power of impeachment" and the Senate has the "sole power to try all impeachments." The Supreme Court considered this sufficient evidence that the framers ...


46

@User4012 makes some good arguments, I'll add a few. The Founders greatly underestimated the relative power of the Congress and the President and expected that the Congress would turn out to be the dominant branch, making removal of the President less important. There is a reason that Article I (Congress) comes before Article II (the Executive Branch) and ...


46

Four reasons: Whataboutism. It's easy to make potshots at vague 'questionable' behavior without actually trying to get to the bottom of it and punish those responsible. Add to that a refusal to defend one's own actions, and people quickly come to believe that 'all politicians do (X bad behavior)'. This has worked amazingly well for Trump against Hillary ...


44

The concern about checks and balances is important, but you are misunderstanding how these checks and balances work in the United States government. The FBI is Not a Check on the President The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal law enforcement agency located within the executive branch of the government (under the President). The FBI's ...


44

There would still be a 2020 election If a President is impeached and removed from office, or stops being the President for any other reason, the Vice President serves the remainder of that President's term, according to the 25th Amendment to the Constitution. The 25th Amendment has been tested under Richard Nixon. Although he was not impeached, Richard ...


44

@divibisan but this question isn't about reviewing impeachments. It's about whether impeaching a former president is constitutional. @divibisan I do not understand your question. OP asks why it is the Senate voting on the question as opposed to the Supreme Court. The supreme court never rules on the constitutionality of anything unless that question has a ...


42

No. There is no way that interested members of the public or Congress could force the President of the United States to undergo a mental health examination. In principle, a mental health examination could be ordered for the President, like anyone else, incident to a criminal prosecution of him for some crime committed in his personal, rather than official ...


42

Nothing happens. Executive orders stay in place until they are revoked or changed by the new President (the former Vice President). The new President can do that as easily as the precedessor made them. But only if the new President wants to do that. Laws not vetoed by the last President stay valid until Congress makes new laws which revoke them, and they ...


41

Personal lawyers are paid for by the President himself while the federal government pays for lawyers from the Office of the White House Counsel (see this WH document for their salaries). Legal teams outside of the Office of the White House Counsel cannot be covered using taxpayers' funds: The White House did not respond this week to requests for comment ...


40

There have been 2 governors who were impeached twice. From this Research Response 1 published by the Illinois General Assembly, Governors Henry Johnston of Oklahoma and Harrison Reed of Florida were both impeached twice. Johnston was acquitted in 1928 but convicted in 1929 while Reed was acquitted both times in 1868 and in 1872. 1This document was published ...


39

Since the public decide whom to elect as a president, why can't they vote on impeaching the president? The public doesn't (directly) decide whom to elect. The president is elected by the Electoral College, whose vote is generally determined by the popular vote. As for "why can't they vote on impeaching the president," the process of impeachment is ...


38

Technically speaking? You're right, nothing Practically speaking though there are 2 problems with it. First, you're assuming that the House majority and Senate super majority are completely on the same page and willing to make the speaker the new president. No one can dissent or lose your guaranteed win. That is not impossible, but it's very hard to do. ...


38

A US president is trying to pressure a foreign nation into attacking his electoral competition by withholding aid. With a concrete record of this happening. It is a clear case of someone twisting foreign policy for his personal gain. Foreign policy is supposed to be decided in the interests of the nation, not to benefit the guy put in charge of the nation. ...


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