109

One of the main reasons was that the President - even now, never mind in Founding Fathers' time - is not the "head of government", the way Prime Ministers are in Parliamentary systems. The President is the head of Executive Branch of government, and in Founders' time that branch had fairly little power, therefore there was far less possible impact and ...


107

No one has attempted to "reign in or remove the President" because he has not been found to have done anything illegal. These "politically motivated sackings" were not of elected officials or even people appointed by congress. They were political appointees in the executive branch, which the President is in charge of. Obama replaced George W. Bush ...


93

Please, understand me in a right way - I'm not position myself as pro-Trump/pro-democrat - it is inner deals of foreign country for me, like a chess party. But this is just interesting question, I think - as things start going fast. Given this, I’m going to take a step back here and look at a fundamental underlying question here: Does [anything at all] ...


86

This comment is coming from the same President who called lifelong Republican Robert Mueller "a Democrat" for investigating him. He doesn't use these words to mean what they mean. He consistently uses them as epithets to dehumanize anyone who doesn't support him. It is a cue for his in-group to consider these people 'outsiders' and 'nonbelievers'. '...


70

No, from ABC News (in reference to Ambassador Bill Taylor and Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman; emphasis mine): Trump has repeatedly lambasted these officials sitting for depositions as “Never Trumpers” – he called the United States’ top diplomat in Ukraine, Bill Taylor, one, too – despite the fact that there’s no evidence they have political biases ...


68

You wrote that you are an outside observer (I live in Europe) As a fellow European, I can somewhat relate. There is an important thing to consider, though: in the US, professional bureaucrats play a lot smaller role than in most European countries. Your profile page states that you are from the UK. In the UK, only the very top bureaucrats are political ...


65

Answer: During an impeachment trial, the Senate can "disqualify" an officeholder from holding any public office again, but that is a separate vote from their "removal". Article 1, Section 3, Clause 7 of the Constitution says (emphasis mine): Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to ...


63

If I understand correctly, in the United States, charges are currently being brought against President Trump You understand incorrectly. It has been asserted that President Trump may have done those things that you mentioned, but he has not yet been charged with anything. There is no criminal proceeding currently taking place in Congress that will result ...


53

One is an expected form of power transfer, the other is not. In a parliamentary democracy, each representative has a mandate from their constituents, and only in aggregate can they form a government. If that government can't command a majority in the parliament, they basically can't govern, but someone else might be able to. Depending on the exact ...


53

A president can be impeached as many times as the House would like. The House could impeach the president multiple times in the same term if they wanted to. They could impeach on the same charges each time if they wanted to. Impeachment isn't a criminal charge so things like double-jeopardy aren't a consideration. The only consideration is practical and ...


52

Has Nancy Pelosi made any public statements about why she is not supporting a push for impeachment, or what line Trump would have to cross, before she would support it? On September 20, 2019, House Speaker Pelosi gave an interview to NPR, Pelosi Says Congress Should Pass New Laws So Sitting Presidents Can Be Indicted. But despite the growing chants among ...


47

In Walter L. Nixon v. United States (unrelated to President Richard Nixon), the court held that the judiciary could not review impeachment proceedings. According to the constitution, the House has the "sole power of impeachment" and the Senate has the "sole power to try all impeachments." The Supreme Court considered this sufficient evidence that the framers ...


46

@User4012 makes some good arguments, I'll add a few. The Founders greatly underestimated the relative power of the Congress and the President and expected that the Congress would turn out to be the dominant branch, making removal of the President less important. There is a reason that Article I (Congress) comes before Article II (the Executive Branch) and ...


44

The concern about checks and balances is important, but you are misunderstanding how these checks and balances work in the United States government. The FBI is Not a Check on the President The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal law enforcement agency located within the executive branch of the government (under the President). The FBI's ...


44

There would still be a 2020 election If a President is impeached and removed from office, or stops being the President for any other reason, the Vice President serves the remainder of that President's term, according to the 25th Amendment to the Constitution. The 25th Amendment has been tested under Richard Nixon. Although he was not impeached, Richard ...


42

Nothing happens. Executive orders stay in place until they are revoked or changed by the new President (the former Vice President). The new President can do that as easily as the precedessor made them. But only if the new President wants to do that. Laws not vetoed by the last President stay valid until Congress makes new laws which revoke them, and they ...


40

No. There is no way that interested members of the public or Congress could force the President of the United States to undergo a mental health examination. In principle, a mental health examination could be ordered for the President, like anyone else, incident to a criminal prosecution of him for some crime committed in his personal, rather than official ...


39

Yes, from the August 26 letter from the Inspector General to the Acting Director of National Intelligence as published by the NY Times: Having determined that the complaint relating to the urgent concern appears credible, I am transmitting to you this notice of my determination, along with the Complainant's Letter and Classified Appendix.


38

Wikipedia: Impeachment in the United States - Constitutional Provisions Article I, Section 2, Clause 5 provides: The House of Representatives ... shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Article I, Section 3, Clauses 6 and 7 provides: The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, ...


38

"Madam Speaker" is not Rep. Pelosi, but Rep. Diana DeGette, a Democrat from Colorado, who is serving as speaker pro tempore and presiding over the US House of Representatives for the debate on the impeachment of President Trump. https://denver.cbslocal.com/2019/12/18/diana-degette-impeachment-debate-preside-donald-trump-house-representatives-colorado/


38

Yes, the Senate can hold a trial, but they would have to change their rules first in order to do so. There's no Constitutional requirement that the Articles of Impeachment be somehow "sent" to the Senate. The only parts of the US Constitution regarding impeachment are Article I, Section 2, Paragraph 5: 5: The House of Representatives shall chuse their ...


38

Since the public decide whom to elect as a president, why can't they vote on impeaching the president? The public doesn't (directly) decide whom to elect. The president is elected by the Electoral College, whose vote is generally determined by the popular vote. As for "why can't they vote on impeaching the president," the process of impeachment is ...


37

A US president is trying to pressure a foreign nation into attacking his electoral competition by withholding aid. With a concrete record of this happening. It is a clear case of someone twisting foreign policy for his personal gain. Foreign policy is supposed to be decided in the interests of the nation, not to benefit the guy put in charge of the nation. ...


36

A relevant quote attributed to Benjamin Franklin: Dr. Franklin was for retaining the clause [on impeachment], as favorable to the executive. History furnishes one example only of a first magistrate being formally brought to public justice. Every body cried out against this as unconstitutional. What was the practice before this, in cases where the chief ...


36

An attempt to remove Trump from office via impeachment would likely fail because it requires a huge amount of Republican support, and Nancy Pelosi has a good enough reading of Congress to know that the support isn't there. Not even close. If an impeachment attempt fails, then Trump may try to use it to proclaim himself innocent of any and all wrongdoing ...


36

On Trump-leaning side of the media, it's taken as evidence of some big Democratic conspiracy to bring down Trump. Trump himself claimed that Schiff "helped write" the whistleblower's complaint. This has been repeated by pro-Trump media personalities like Tucker Carlson, although even Carlson only presented the collaborative writing bit as "credible rumours"; ...


34

Another source states: In all, the House of Representatives has impeached only 19 federal officials, and the Senate has conducted formal impeachment trials with seven acquittals, eight convictions, three dismissals and one resignation (Nixon’s) with no further action. This is inaccurate as Nixon was never impeached in the first place. He resigned ...


34

Personal lawyers are paid for by the President himself while the federal government pays for lawyers from the Office of the White House Counsel (see this WH document for their salaries). Legal teams outside of the Office of the White House Counsel cannot be covered using taxpayers' funds: The White House did not respond this week to requests for comment ...


33

Impeachment is a prosecution process; it only applies for gross misconduct, and the threshold for its success is really high. The PM can retire with only moderate shame after losing a vote of no confidence, but an president who is impeached and convicted ought to go to jail. A vote of no confidence, on the other hand, simply indicates that the government is ...


31

"We have not spoken directly with the whistleblower," he said. "We would like to, but I'm sure the whistleblower has concerns, that he has not been advised, as the law requires, by the inspector general or the director of national intelligence just as to how he is to communicate with Congress." CNN Fact Check: Fact-checking Schiff's claim on speaking with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible