38

Do former US presidents have the right to receive daily CIA briefings? In Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush by Jon Meacham, published in 2015, there is a statement, Bush inhaled the daily CIA briefings sent to former presidents, ... There is reason to accept that former presidents have received daily CIA briefings, at ...


11

The question given at the end of the body references both Israel and "Western powers." Using that broader category, the answer appears to be to a significant extent. According to an interview that Asia News International did with the NSO Group, as reprinted in the Times of India, the company that produces Pegasus, the majority of their customers ...


11

It's difficult to say for sure as the arguments are not made public. However, we can speculate that it is most likely due to commercial pressure. Huawei dominates the 5G market, being well ahead in terms of shipping hardware and holding many of the key patents. Trying to build a 5G network without Huawei is going to be more expensive and take longer. That ...


8

Basically, one has to answer all questions unless – the witness exercise his right against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment the information is classified the President asserts his "executive privilege" the question is outside the scope of the hearing the question is asking for investigative information in a criminal case it violates ...


8

The UK is caught between a rock and a hard place (well worth a listen). On the one hand side, you have a big trade partner that's made all the more important with the looming Brexit, China, and its national champion, Huawei. The latter is enormous (because of China's own market), reportedly has better and cheaper equipment than the next two big players (...


7

No, it is not normal. The Government provided two examples of previous reports that each happened to take (A) ten days for the Government to confirm were OK to publish and (B) six weeks for publication. So on average, each activity took ten days and six weeks respectively. But the PM has not given the OK for this report within ten days, so that delay is ...


6

No. What a country does within its own borders is its own matter. Under diplomatic conventions, diplomats have immunity from arrest or prosecution. However, diplomats can be expelled without the host country having to give a reason. So diplomats are not arrested for spying, they are just told to leave, and no reason is given. For example, following the ...


6

The most important thing to remember is that what we know about this mostly results from a leaked list of telephone numbers analysed by Amnesty International (which then found spyware on some phones associated with the list). What this list really is is disputed but it might have been a list of telephone numbers NSO considered targetting on behalf of some of ...


5

Not specifically since coming to power, as far as I'm aware. The AP piece which broke the story states that "officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity". The obvious change in circumstances that has come in recent days is the Russian State Duma's denouncement of the treaty, however. The State ...


4

Of primary relevance to your question is the fact that the persons giving testimony were doing so without having been served with a subpoena to testify. Voluntary testimony is, well, voluntary and not subject to the Congressional recourse of Contempt of Congress proceedings. The type of (voluntary) testimonial proceeding you reference might be ...


3

I don't know if this article answers the question perfectly — and it was written on August 4, 2020, so it misses the Russian hacking incident and anything else in the last 5 months of the year — but it's a good start. CNN: 37 times Trump was soft on Russia That's roughly once every five weeks during Trump's term.


3

The UK has the "Huawei cyber security evaluation centre" in Banbury, Oxfordshire. The staff are Huawei employees who hold UK security clearance and also report to the UK services. This allows them to review the security of Huawei products in great detail. You can read their report. Their conclusions were that there were the usual amounts of poor code quality ...


3

The question itself is whether there is any legal internationally-adapted convention against identifying active spies as "former"? And if so, whether these conventions make it incumbent upon their past employers to "rein them in" if their actions interfere with public good of other states after their retirement. There is no such convention. Spies ...


3

So in your first two cases, these are cases where the spy retired from government employment and then used their connections and skill sets for other legitimate purposes. I cannot speak to KGB and successor organization policies, but within the U.S. and presumbably UK, you are still under a non-disclosure agreement about the work you did for the agency and ...


2

They need the Patriot act because otherwise, legislation passed in the wake of Church Committee hearings in the 1970s completely hamstrung (where not outright prohibiting) any such sharing. Please note that the Church effects weren't only in explicit prohibition in terms of direct letter of the law - for example, there were chilling effects on information ...


2

Prior to the Patriot act the CIA and the US Military were not allowed to share intelligence with the FBI or any other US Agencies. The reason being that the CIA and Military were concerned with intelligence and criminal activity outside of the US while the FBI et al., was res;onsible for activity inside the US. Some of the limitations that protect citizens ...


2

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/schengen-information-system_en The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the most widely used and largest information sharing system for security and border management in Europe. SIS enables competent national authorities, such as the police and border guards, to enter and consult ...


2

Any risk presented by conducting such interviews is presumably far lower than the risk of not conducting them. The question seems to assume that the fact that a person is being considered for top secret security clearance is in itself sensitive information. But in fact it's often obvious if someone you know personally has security clearance, even if you ...


1

TL;DR - No more than existing, publicly available documents already show Russian interference in UK democracy. Brief mention is made of the Scottish Independence referendum (pg 13) in that, "Credible open source commentary suggesting that Russia undertook influence campaigns in relation to the Scottish independence referendum in 2014." In regards ...


1

According to declassified ruling of the FISA court, in March of 2016, NSA Director Rogers became aware of improper access to raw FISA data and ordered an internal audit. The issue here is technically not unmasking (because raw FISA data has not been minimized/masked in the first place) but it is indicative the same essential violation of the intent of the ...


1

This isn't an answer, but too long to comment. I haven't seen any Saudi public comments about the bugged consulate -- but doesn't mean it doesn't exist (hence, not an answer). Instead, the public statements have been defending MBS. For instance “The United States, Germany, France, Canada, we made them all listen ... The man clearly says ‘I know how to cut’. ...


1

There are many such databases. Another answer mentions the Schengen Information System, but countries outside the EU and the Schengen area cannot participate. This includes the US, of course, which you mentioned in your question. Some countries share such information bilaterally. For example, Canadian border officers have access to the United States' ...


1

So, what exactly is GCHQ (or Theresa May) saying here? Are they implying that the Five Eyes pact has been changed since 2013 to ban using intelligence sharing to circumvent national laws, or are they (implausibly) trying to deny that such circumvention ever occurred at all under the original terms of pact? She is a politician, so she is simply denying that ...


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