New answers tagged

25

There is something called the Intergovernmental Agreement. It says that each country has jurisdiction over its own nationals aboard the ISS. So for example, if a Japanese astronaut sexually assaults a Russian astronaut, then the Japanese government would be in charge of prosecution. This agreement applies only to the ISS. It isn't a more general law about ...


3

Wouldn't allowing a state to default not hurt the credit rating of the whole country, isn't it like partially defaulting on its debt and refusing to restructure it? This is a matter of discretion for the credit rating agencies, and ultimately the public (who choose to buy or not-buy the country's bonds). However, I would not describe it as the federal ...


30

The Wolf Amendment was a focused attempt to stop China's specific behavior of stealing civilian space technology and using it to develop military capabilities The Wolf Amendment was not passed just to give China a slap on the wrist because of "geopolitical tensions." The Wolf Amendment was passed because there was a concern that China was engaged ...


-1

In fact, Russia is preparing to leave: Last Monday, as Russia celebrated the 60th anniversary of the launch that made Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin the first human in space, President Vladimir Putin called for a new space development strategy over the next decade. But in previously untelevised remarks that aired Sunday on the state-run Rossia 1 broadcaster,...


15

Much of the ISS was built by the Russians, including the central control room. They are one of the primary stake holders, on equal if not higher ground with the US.


82

In addition to RedGrittyBrick's correct answer, also do not forget that between 2011 and 2020, russian Soyuz rockets were how to get to and from the ISS. If tensions between the US and Russia had extended to the ISS, it would have been the USA losing access to the station, not Russia. Update: RedGrittyBrick has updated his answer to include the transport ...


80

Ownership Russia owns a significant part of the ISS Treaty Access to the ISS is governed by an international treaty, the Space Station Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) Article 9 (Utilization) Clause 4 says In its use of the Space Station, each Partner, through its Cooperating Agency, shall seek through the mechanisms established in the MOUs to avoid ...


7

The premise of the question is that Russia/China would want to arm the North Korea and other rogue regimes just to spite the US and NATO or simply for financial gain. I think their actual calculation is more subtle. Moreover, one argurably draws more benefit from the possibility of selling that from the actual sale. Let me give just a few considerations: ...


6

Let's distinguish between UN General Assembly resolutions and UN Security Council resolutions. General Assembly resolutions are more accurately called recommendations, so for those, the answer is NO. Security Council resolutions, on the other hand, are enforceable under Chapter VII of the UN Charter. Chapter VII exclusively deals with Action with Respect ...


4

Even during Soviet era... Russia was so smart to not sell "good" weapons to their nearby countries, that as you know were willing to do rebellions. Bonus answers = in fact the idea of soviet technologies during cold war was not real, analysts analyse weapons of the countries outside russia but as Surokov tells in is book "inside the soviet ...


33

Why would both China and Russia want to modernize North Korean army in the first place? They both (mainly China) derive some benefits from the NK behavior, but they don't completely control NK (that's the point of being a sovereign, after all). On one hand, any improvement in the NK military potential will force both China and Russia, as well as other ...


32

Your premise is incorrect as to the state of the DPRK army. The Chonma-ho may not be up to the standards of an Abrams, but it is much more modern than the T-34. It is unclear if the DPRK really has operational ICBMs. They certainly haven't done as many (successful or unsuccessful) tests as the USA and the Soviet Union did during the cold war. Are their ...


37

Maybe this is a bit of circular reasoning, but UN sanctions prohibit countries from supplying North Korea with such weapons (and much more). You might say this reasoning is circular because China or Russia could have prevented these UN resolutions by vetoing them, but they didn't. As for weapons, there is Resolution 1718 passed in 2006, which according to ...


0

While the aforementioned Abdul Quadeer Khan (in the answer of o.m.) was working in a Dutch uranium enrichment plant he managed to get hold of various secret documents. These documents were later of key importance in the development of the Pakistan atomic bomb. Although this espionage was made possible due to extreme laxity of the Dutch intelligence agencies,...


3

Prohibitions against selling blood are a specific case of prohibitions against any trafficking in body parts. This is generally intended to prevent poor people from being taken advantage of by rich people. One can easily imagine a billionaire who needs a kidney transplant, but doesn't want to put themselves on the normal waiting list. Instead, they go to a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included