305

Yes, there was the case of Netflix and Comcast for example. The events were basically these: Comcast noticed that Netflix is responsible for a lot of traffic of their private internet customers. Comcast asked Netflix to pay for a better quality of service to their customers. They refused. Comcast started throttling Netflix. The bandwidth available between ...


157

Here's a comment that's been circulating on reddit discussing the answer to this question. I didn't write it, but I thought it had excellent information. It was originally posted (as far as I can tell) by u/The_Brutally_Honest in an r/OutOfTheLoop thread about Net Neutrality. Here's the link to the comment. Also for anyone who tells you that "Net ...


106

Almost all high-speed broadband Internet service providers, except in high-density urban populations, have limited competition, if not full monopolies. A small start-up would have to build out their own infrastructure with no existing customer base, which isn't going to happen, in most cases. This is why so many people want to treat the providers like a ...


82

There have been a few examples, in part, these examples have pushed this more into the spotlight. It's often under the term 'traffic shaping' if you are interested, here is Sandvine, a company that offers those shaping services. If you are interested in the peer2peer domain (which is heavily bringing this issue to the forefront) here is a national list of ...


68

You also can take a look at mobile internet products in Portugal: Now assume you have the VIDEO pack because you watch Twitch a lot. If you now decide to get some streaming service, will it be Netflix where you already have the traffic covered in your package or will it be e.g. Amazon Prime? If this then really a "free market" where you freely decide ...


55

TikTok doesn't take just your location data, it also takes your clipboard. Everything you copy/paste while TikTok is open, even if it's only open in the background, is sent to their servers. So passwords, banking info, bitcoin addresses, anything at all that you might copy. This is not normal. This is why it is a national security risk. Caleb Chen, ...


53

Background The heart of the issue here is Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act was not part of the original Senate legislation, but was added in conference with the House, where it had been separately introduced by Representatives Christopher Cox (R-CA) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) as the Internet ...


51

The proposed argument for this bill is that it will help to cut down on crimes, specifically sexual child abuse. Presently, end to end encryption provides a near impenetrable means for anyone (including bad actors) to send data over the internet without fearing that someone else will get ahold of it. The bill is mostly concerned that big sites with ...


48

The capitalist answer to this problem is that when there is a real desire for net-neutral internet providers, then the market will create them. An internet provider could publicly commit to maintaining net neutrality and use that commitment as an unique selling proposition in their advertisement. Consumers who care about net neutrality could then vote with ...


45

An article in Wired took a look at this a few weeks ago. By and large, the experts agree with your assessment that TikTok in particular poses no special security risk and that a ban is not justified. Here's a key paragraph from the Wired piece. TikTok’s fiercest opponents argue that it should be viewed as a dangerous Trojan horse for Chinese Communist Party ...


36

Comcast, in the face of cable cutting, is now applying usage caps on their data services, but continues to provide unlimited access to their video feeds. Comcast loses ~$38 in "contribution margin" per cord-cutter Since their service has been all-digital (everywhere?) for a decade or so, it's clear that they are penalizing their data-only customers in order ...


34

IANA isn't responsible for allocating IP address ranges to countries. Instead, it delegates allocations to one of the five regional Internet registries. In the case of North Korea, the RIR responsible would be APNIC. Theoretically, the US could mess with APNIC's IP address blocks, but at the risk of angering quite a few people (including - but not limited to ...


30

Another factor - it's in United States' interest for North Korea to have internet. Dan Carlin on a recent podcast formalized a statement that I largely agree with - Soviet Union was brought down as much by economic/technological competition, as by communications. Beatles, Rock'n'Roll and Jeans. The more the people in despotic regimes like North Korea have ...


29

As an example of something Net Neutrality rules have effectively blocked, Verizon lawyers admitted in court of law that given the opportunity, they probably would throttle or even completely block content. ... the judges asked whether the company [Verizon] intended to favor certain websites over others. “I’m authorized to state from my client today,” ...


25

The question should be: who is supporting this legislation through lobbying. And a bit searching finds a partial answer: Some groups are opposed to the proposed Copyright Directive on the grounds it will ‘shut down the internet’, ‘ban memes’ or even hamper creativity itself. PRS for Music, a non-profit organisation which represents thousands of songwriters ...


20

I cannot offer objectives, because they are not publicly known. What I can list are benefits - possible motivations. Serve as a distraction. The current administration has a history of using news to distract from (even) less favorable news. Contribute to a greater strategy of vilifying China as an enemy to rally against. Demonstrate strength and leadership ...


18

By having a free market. If consumers didn't want plans that delivered some content with better QoS than others or that limited content, they could simply choose to purchase from providers that don't do that. If there's enough demand for it, someone will offer it. And people who don't actually care that much about it can probably buy cheaper plans that do ...


18

I can't speak for the motives of the administration, but the idea that TikTok is a national security risk is plausible. From location data alone, one can infer your political interests (do you go to the gun range? Are you attending BLM protests?), your religious affiliation (do you go to houses of worship?), and your hobbies/interests, and that alone (far ...


17

As long as Title II is on the books, they don't have a choice -it must be applied to all common carriers. The text of Title II explicitly says this: It shall be unlawful for any common carrier to make any unjust or unreasonable discrimination in charges, practices, classifications, regulations, facilities, or services for or in connection with like ...


15

What challenges remain for online voting? One very important challenge that has not been mentioned so far is simplicity. For democracy, participation is important. And people only participate if they think it is fair. If people don't understand a system, they might tend to think that somebody is cheating in a complicated way. In Germany, we have some ...


15

In 2005, Telus, a Canadian telecom, censored a union's website from its Internet subscribers when its workers went on strike. (While that wasn't an action to favour its business partners, it was certainly an action to hurt its business enemy.)


15

NegativeFriction laid out the arguments for & against the act, so I'll focus on the implications. Stewart Baker lays this out fairly well, but severely downplays the impact. The main point is that the EARN IT Act will revoke liability protections given in section 230 of the CDA, so providers will be liable for content transferred via their ...


13

From this Arstechnica article I went extracted this report that is cited and reported in the article itself. The report is from June 2017, so not particularly old. Figure 2, reported also in the article, I think that answers your question quite clearly: If we define "broadband" as anything above 25Mbps (as the FCC suggests [see note] we do), about 40% of ...


12

It's not clear that he has such powers. The "emergency economic powers" derives from the IEEPA of 1977 which allow the president to act against an unusual and extraordinary threat... to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States [that originates] in whole or substantial part outside the United States. It would allow ...


11

It might be a result of the edit, but your question appears to be missing a key element. Everything else you listed are things that individual people can pay more to get. The internet equivalent would be paying more to your ISP for a higher tier of broadband to your home. The discussions of "internet fast lanes" are for companies paying ISPs for a faster ...


11

Another example would be AT&T's Sponsored Data program. Engadget talks about the fcc accusing them of Net Neutrality violations here. The list goes on and on you don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure anytime a corporation wants something it can't be for the benefit of the public, unless they are a non-profit.


10

Net Neutrality is about preventing companies from selling certain products. Asking how the free market can prevent the effects of the net neutrality repeal is asking how the free market is going to prevent Nike from selling shoes that contain no laces. Russia has no netneutrality. A while ago I was hosting couchsurfers from Russia in Berlin that had a ...


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