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51

It's difficult to answer this in a comprehensive fashion, but generally I think the answer is (a qualified) 'no'. E.g. Freedom House: The Islamic Republic of Iran holds elections regularly, but they fall short of democratic standards due in part to the influence of the hard-line Guardian Council, an unelected body that disqualifies all candidates it deems ...


45

The US relationship with Pakistan is complicated, but for decades it was viewed as an ally. In the 1970's and 80's, India was somewhat friendly towards the Soviet Union (while remaining nonaligned). That encouraged a relationship between Pakistan and the US. After India developed a nuclear weapon, the US (as I understand it) looked the other way while ...


24

To quote UK Essays. (November 2018). Geopolitical Position Of Pakistan History Essay, " Pakistan has a significant geopolitical position as it is situated in a region that is of high grandness due to its political, economic, and strategic position. " The primary reasons for the incentives that Pakistan enjoys from the US despite the repeated ...


19

The complete proposal was presented in an annex to a letter from Iran's permanent representative to the UN Secretary-General. The letter and annex are hosted on the UN's website with document number S/2019/862. The letter reads: It is a source of grave concern that, after more than seven decades, the question of Palestine is still unresolved and the ...


14

This question seems to assume that 1) Iran is a defenceless nation where nobody has guns. And 2) that the UK government considers this to be a top priority. The comparisons with Qasem Soleimani is very weak. He was assassinated in an unmanned drone strike in Iraq, where the US military has full license to operate and had total air-superiority. There's a ...


11

Even if the impression is sometimes to the contrary, the US does not go around invading other countries on a whim. The US has a lengthy history of trying to influence Iranian affairs. This spectacularly backfired in 1979 and contributed to the Islamic revolution. (It would be hubris to say it caused the revolution.) So the US decided to provide limited ...


10

Executive actions can be changed by Biden without consulting Congress. So, for example the restrictions on travel from mainly Muslim countries was done by executive order. This order can be reversed on Jan 20th. Legislation passed in the last four years can't be repealed except by Congress, and repeal bills can be filibustered in the Senate. So, for example ...


8

It is extremely difficult as a practical matter to invade a country and rescue someone if the country isn't already in chaos due to a war or revolution in progress. It would also considered an act of war to do so, that could escalate the situation out of control, and at a minimum might result in retaliatory action against Commonwealth citizens in Iran in the ...


7

At the moment, no. As part of the 2015 JCPOA the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) did conduct inspections of Iranian nuclear facilities, including unannounced snap inspections. Since Trump pulled out of the agreement and reimposed sanctions Iran has been moving away from the conditions of the agreement. As part of that, in February Iran came to an ...


6

There are 2 aspects to the questions - why didn't the US invade Iran, and are those missiles a significant hindrance? The missiles? Doubt it. They'd have to target fixed targets, like airfields. Yes, they could, but those would be defended. If the US has credible plans to take on Russia or China in a hot war, Iran's missiles would not be a tactical game ...


6

A "managed democracy" is not democracy. At all. It may maintain an image of a democracy (e.g. run elections) in order to get some kind of international recognition as being more or less democratic, but it completely lacks any of the proposed benefits of a democracy. Like, say, government acceptable for a significant part of the population.


5

There are many analysts who call Iran a dictatorship while many others call it democratic. So when going by experts' opinions it's almost to each their own! By Western definitions the answer is a clear no. But the current constitution was drafted by the parliament and approved by the citizens with overwhelming support during a referendum. The power wasn't ...


4

A nation has the right not to trade with anybody they don't like. They even have the right not to trade with anybody who trades with anybody they don't like. No pretext is necessary, really. Passing such sanctions on a whim might run afoul of international trade treaties, but a nation has the right not to be a member of the WTO, or not to sign any bilateral ...


4

Iran is a fascinating study. The answer is "no", but it is a question which deserves more than a binary answer. Western powers for various reasons of self-interest, recent history and regional alliances seek to suppress Iran, so the impression of Iran is biased. The Western implementation of democracy is an evolving compromise between elites and ...


4

Maybe Operation Eagle Claw will refresh your memory? While seductive in theory, for clear-cut cases of abuse, these kinds of rescue mission are mostly impractical against a country that is prepared for it. The hostage has a good chance of getting killed. Or at least moved out. The risk of failure in a country with a functioning military is high. It can ...


3

In any geography textbook Iran is classified as a Theocracy. It is a state where the religion is more important than the secularity in the executive/legislative, administrative and judiciary systems. They are actually a democracy, they have elections, but the thing is that the Ayatollah, the religious leader, have more power than the democratically elected ...


3

Factually, Iran WAS at some time in the past prevented from creation of nukes while Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was in power. Since US withdrawal from it in Trump times, Iran also rejected it. Now it seems that Biden's administration is trying to revive the deal, but it's unclear if it ever can succeed. PS Also, it should be noted, that there are some ...


3

While the actual motives of the decisionmakers involved cannot be known with certainty, there are several factors that almost certainly contributed to the choices made regarding the U.S. stance towards Iran. Iran's military presents a credible threat to the lives of U.S. servicemembers. Although staggering differences in capacity exist between the ...


3

Islamic countries that are generally enemies or dislike each other will occasionally ally in efforts that combat shared enemies. The most common target in groups like this is Israel, though things viewed as a general threat to Islam or theocratic rule are often targeted as well. OIC is also a way to support Shari'ah law over more western views on human ...


2

Firstly, it'd be a violation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty [NPT] in Article II and other articles, as it's forbidden for non-nuclear-weapon state parties to research, proliferate or manufacture such weapons. Article II [NPT]: Each non-nuclear-weapon State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to receive the transfer from any transferor whatsoever of nuclear ...


2

Because Iran is very useful as it is. Since the end of WWII US internal and foreign policy has been heavily dependent on the availability of a bogeyman. The soviet empire first and lesser bogeymen later helped justify huge military spending and invasions of small countries on the ground they might be taken by the bogeyman otherwise. An example of using Iran ...


1

A military operation like this does typically lead to fatalities. Even if we could tell that there will be only one fatality, and the fatality will be an Iranian, you are proposing to trade a life for a life. But we cannot tell that there will only be one fatality, and even if we could, we cannot tell if the fatality will be Iranian or British. A military ...


1

This is a frame challenge: In aspiration and in practice the OIC is not dominated by Saudi Arabia and the UAE. The largest grouping within the OIC is the Parlimentary Union of the OIC. It is headquartered in Tehran. The OIC has repeatedly refused membership to India (despite the large number of Indian Muslims) ostensibly due to opposition from Pakistan over ...


1

if it does, can they protect Iran's economy from economic sanctions? No. Because the world economic activities are USA-based. Petrodollar system The world's oil business is controlled by the USD. Domination of USD USD is the dominant reserve currency in the world. As long as the USD is the dominant transaction or reserve currency in the world, no one ...


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