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1

in order to know why it is a big business , you need to know how it works and why. filtering and blocking is based on two ideas. when you access a service on the internet (like visiting a website or using a service like Skype for example) a connection is established between your device and the server providing the website or the service those servers ...


-1

you need to protect something if it is under attack. Zoroastrians practice their religion freely and since they are not a missionary religion (i.e. do not seek converts) they have no problem with the Muslim community. They only part of their religion they can not practice is 'sky burial', which is prohibited by law on public health grounds. a single case ...


0

As usual the short answer does not require a lot of explanations the revolutionary dogma of Iran threatens the US allies in the region (The absolute monarchies of the Gulf states and Israel) A. The absolute monarchies sees the revolution that toppled the strongest monarch in the area as a threat to their dynasties. they use whatever means they have, to ...


-1

As an Arab and a Muslim, from the middle east , in simple terms the sunni-shia conflict only exist in the US media and their Allies in English speaking media , I have never heard the term in Arabic media, so simply, there is no sunni - shia hostility , only propaganda if you want to know more here is why the term became popular after the US invasion of ...


2

A religious "supreme leader" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Leader_of_Iran Execution of gays. https://www.dw.com/en/iran-defends-execution-of-gay-people/a-49144899 Ongoing terrorism https://www.brookings.edu/blog/order-from-chaos/2019/01/24/the-iranian-revolution-and-its-legacy-of-terrorism/ Incitement against the United States. https://www.reuters....


1

In addition to Colin's excellent list of reasons, there is the Iranian regime's continual incitement against the USA, such as crowds chanting "death to America" at its behest and US flags that people are supposed to walk on to show their hatred of the US. (The linked story talks about people who refuse to walk on the flags).


1

Turkish officials have definitely come out against the sanctions: "Why are you putting pressure on other countries? Take your own measures. Why do other countries have to obey your unilateral decisions?" he [Turkish foreign minister Mevlut Cavusoglu] asked. However, as far as breaking the sanctions, the closest I could find was this indictment: ...


4

"Good friends" may be an exaggeration, but "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" probably explains some of that. Turkey (or rather Erdogan) sees itself/himself as the leader of the Islamic/Sunni world (and this puts it at odds with Iran somewhat) but even more so with Iran's other Islamic/Sunni enemies, namely Saudi Arabia and the UAE. For example, Turkey and ...


5

This is a somewhat misconceived question. The legality of "targeted killing" under international law has been debated for quite a while now; I'm not going to go over those arguments here, but I'll say that being a "foreign official" doesn't give someone some kind of additional immunity in international law in this regard. (I won't address US law [or ...


4

Zoroastrians are recognised as a religious community. They are tolerated rather than protected. There is one seat assigned to the Zoroastrian community in parliament. Parliament is a relatively weak body, most power resides in the Islamic Guardian Council. Zoroastrians have been removed from city councils by the Guardian Council on the grounds that they are ...


3

The VPN in Iran is just a ridiculous business. You should know that there is a significant difference between Islamic Republic dictatorship and any other totalitarian regime that history remembers like Soviet Union, China, North Korea, etc., and that is Islamic Republic is truly an unique example of Machiavellistic government. I mean you can barely call it a ...


4

I'm originally from Iran but I live in the US and also I worked in nanotechnology research and industry for several years in Iran before coming to the US. Unfortunately, my view is mostly negative. I would describe why. It's really hard to describe it cause if you did not live in Iran at least for several years, you can't imagine what's going on there, but ...


1

I'm a programmer, interested in, but not specialized in, security and often listen to the Risky Business podcast which brings in 2 security professionals as well as a journalist who's been covering the subject for 15 years. Coincidentally, a recent podcast was covering the post-Suleimani news and opined specifically on this subject - the coverage about ...


3

Yes, Iran previously threatened withdrawal from the NNPT in 2018. See, for example, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/24/iran-threatens-to-withdraw-from-nuclear-weapons-treaty-npt


10

It's kinda funny that after seeing your post, I searched a lot and I finally found the source of those US flags in Iran. Guess what? They are completely produced in Iran just for the purpose of burning! Read it here. Crazy right? I mean, I'm an Iranian and it totally freaks me out that Ayatollahs' regime spend tons of money to produce the US flags just for ...


6

Saudis have the power of the purse, but Iran commands more respect Theoretically speaking, Saudi Arabia should have much more influence. They have much better economy and living standard, they are custodians of Muslim holy sites, they are Sunni (majority of Muslims) compared to Shia dominated Iran, their military is much stronger on paper and they are not ...


3

Yes, compliance can be monitored without "spot-checks" at military facilities. Much like with racial profiling (as opposed to behavioral profiling), such a technique is essentially throwing resources at random targets with the hope of eventually striking a bulls-eye on a target that they didn't know existed. That process would be a waste of valuable ...


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