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126

You say these things don't happen when they do. Case in point, the notorious Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11 mastermind and behind Daniel Pearl's execution) who WAS jailed in Egypt early in his life, had to flee Bosnia when intelligence had pinpointed him, and was finally captured and turned over to the US by Pakistan. In other words, he was targeted by Muslim ...


93

How do some countries make political laws against the burka but not against nun habits? The nun habit doesn't cover the face, that's the big difference. The usual approach in Europe is to forbid/restrict face covering. Therefore a nun habit usually is allowed. The European Court of Human Rights has allowed bans based on that approach, e.g. the French so ...


35

Without any stats to back my speculations, here are a few reasons why I would expect it to be that way: Stating the obvious but recent immigration to Europe included many people from countries where Islam is an important component of the culture (North Africa, West Africa, Turkey…) Christianity is on the retreat and losing ground to irreligion. To some ...


28

The modern left is not "courting islamism", but scroll down to see some reasons why I believe it may be perceived as such. Some examples showing evidence that it isn't: Left-wing groups in Rojava are actively fighting against islamists, for a secular, democratic, socialist, feminist state, and those groups have considerable support among left-wing groups ...


25

If anything it is the other way round. The key political difference between Sunni and Shia Islam is the status of the family of the prophet. In Shia Islam, God chose Ali, who was Muhammad's cousin and son-in-law, and Muhammad's closest blood relative as the leader of Muslims after Muhammad. The leaders of Shia Islam claim a direct bloodline to Ali. In ...


22

There are many interrelated factors, some of which are: There's just a lot more Sunnis than Shia. Attacks require resources. Sunnis are far better funded (KSA funding Wahhabism; coupled with Iran's relatively depleted funds due to Western sanctions). Attacks require resources. Shia had other priorities (Sunnis). First you had Iran-Iraq war sapping Iran's ...


22

Evidently, they do. There are a lot of Muslim countries who combat terrorism. I think Muslim governments are even more concerned with terrorism than anybody else and take very hard-line measures. Islamist terrorists routinely get imprisoned and executed. Moreover, the most of the "grassroots" popular revolutions in the majority-Muslim countries (Iraq, ...


22

It seems the answers posted so far fail to fully explain how these laws really work. Taking France as an example: The 2010 law does not mention religion at all, but the intent to cover the face. This sidesteps the thorny issue of defining exactly which type of garment is targeted and means that nun habits are obviously not covered. Interestingly, the ...


20

It is a difficult question to answer, mainly because it is a strawman argument. Let me put you a more mundane analogy. You are in a ship in the middle of the Pacific, and find that ex-POTUS Barack Obama has had trouble while water skiing, and he is drowning. You launch him a lifejacket, or get him aboard your ship. Do you think it would reasonable to ...


18

I mostly agree with Michael Broughton answer but I would to add an spin about the relationship between the Arab world and the West. To begin with, at one moment or the other, most of the Muslim countries have recently been Western colonies or protectorates (the most significance exceptions, Turkey and Persia -now Iran- also were under heavily hit). After ...


18

First, let's get some insider information from the man on the ground: I live in Algeria, a North African country. I don't know about the Middle East, but there's no North African islamic government. Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt; none of these are Islamic. Some of these have dealt with problems, some are dealing with problems as I write these ...


18

A 2005 Pew Research survey on Islamic Extremism found that of the Muslim nations surveyed, people had overwhelmingly negative opinions of Jews. I'd be very surprised if attitudes to Israel were better. The most friendly Muslim nation surveyed being Turkey, with a meagre 18% having favourable opinions of Jews, does not speak well of the odds of finding a ...


17

Sharia law is a big and complex subject. A significant number of college students in Saudi Arabia and in Iran, for example, would have it has a college major and pursue graduate studies in it as well. This post focuses on some of the better known and most distinctive features of it from the perspective of an outsider. Needless to say, given the limitations ...


17

Consider the response of the communities involved to: An Islamic woman seen in public not wearing the burka, as proscribed by her religion A nun seen in public not wearing the habit, as proscribed by her religion. The expectation is that failing to wear the burka would inspire a negative reaction, with physical hostility directed towards the offending ...


15

There's no definitive or objective answer, but there are several factors: General attitude around freedom of religion and lack of religious discrimination in USA compared to Europe. There was far less Antisemitism in USA, vs. Europe, always. There were far less sectarian inter-Christian issues as well. The country was heavily founded on and internalized ...


15

Your basic premise is flawed. Traditionally the "left" has stood on the side of oppressed minorities and I think this is what this is. You also have to take history into consideration. After all the "legitimate critiques" of Judaism lead to the murder of six million Jews in Europe and considering that it's not to far fetched to assume some may err on the ...


15

I think your first premise is wrong; here are some counter-examples. The recent attack on a Mosque in New Zealand is being widely referred to as a Terror Attack. The murder of worshippers outside a Mosque in the UK was quickly associated with a 'Right wing terrorist' and now referred to as a Terror Attack. Anders Breivik was convicted of terrorism. When ...


14

The french "ban on burka" is actually a ban on covering one's face in public spaces. It applies equally to burkas, niqabs, masks, scooter helmets etc ... Its application is a different topic. In France, most of the religious veils used fully covering the face are niqabs. The german "ban on burkas" also forbids to cover one's face to people working in some ...


13

The answer by user4012 is pretty good. I do agree that, while some of the stated religious doctrine may still seem a bit extreme to our western sensibilities, most of the Shia-sponsored terrorism had more traditional political aims, ultimately. A lot of what Al-Qaeda used to do, and what ISIS does now falls into the ideological doctrine of Wahhabism. As ...


11

They do. Here are some examples: Newport imams preach anti-extremist message Mosque launches anti-Isis classes for Muslim children to combat online grooming 8 times Muslims took action against Islamic Extremism Muslim group urges new way of dealing with radicals Senior British Muslims back fatwa against Islamic State London Bridge Attack Sees Muslim ...


10

Jizya is the tax given by non Muslims for the protection given by Islamic state. Number of groups are exempt from giving this like monks, poor, women, old people etc. So wealthy Muslims are required to pay Zakath and wealthy non muslims are required to give Jizya. Other than being a tax for government, one purpose of Jizya is that they recognize the state ...


10

In Turkey this was the result of a secularist/Westernizing policy under Ataturk in 1926 and this policy may be poised to change, as the head of state apparently flaunts his violation of this law. Tunisia is apparently the only other example and imposed its ban in 1956 when it gained independence, a time that coincides with strong secularist/Socialist/...


9

TL:DR Because Iran has shifted away from terrorism in Western Europe to terrorism, money laundering, and narco-trafficking in Latin and South America, and for proxy wars against the West and Sunnis in the Middle East. In short, it no longer needed to travel to Europe to strike Westerners. It could do so in Iraq, Yemen, and Afghanistan. For example, ...


9

Your question has a mistaken premise, the law forbids hiding your face in public. It is not related to religious issue. For example, such clothing is forbidden in public in France: From Wikimedia.


8

Would you piss off a crazy nutcase neighbor with guns who have other crazier neighbors with even more and bigger guns? With modern day weapons, voicing your opinion on poorly protected/enforced areas with political differences comes with a high risk of becoming a fatality. It only takes two guys with machine guns to render a church packed with people into ...


8

The problem with narratives is that they mix facts with subjective interpretations, usually with a political motive. This question is ambiguous because it embraces a narrative (unequal treatment of Muslim vs non-Muslim terrorism), itself based on another narrative (Islam is a threat and leads to violence). Both these narratives offer a very distorted view ...


7

Algerian Nationality Code of 1963 excluded non-Muslims from acquiring citizenship allowing citizenship only to those Algerians who had Muslim fathers and paternal grandfathers. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia banned all Jews from even entering, never mind immigrating, 100%, until 2014. Since then, they relaxed this slightly, and allow Jews to apply for work visas, ...


7

Possibly, but it may be a legal infringement on a person's rights. In the United States, infringements on religious rights are subject to a standard of strict scrutiny. This means that, for infringements on religious liberties to be constitutional, they have to further a significant government interest, be necessary to further that government interest, and ...


7

majority of Muslims do not share the radical views I challenge your assumption. There are enough surveys and studies that show that a majority of muslims does share views that we in the west would consider radical, including the rule of Sharia, the dominance of Islam over other faiths or the direct interpretation of the Koran, Hadith and whatever the name ...


7

There were plenty of polls which asked about peoples' reason for voting to leave. While the wider issue of immigration was an option on these polls, I'm not aware of any that asked mentioned Islam specifically. And while there will be some Leave voters who voted with this motivation (one example reported in HuffPost), it's likely that this person was part ...


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