165

The stated goal of ISIS is to eliminate "the grey area". Today there is a sizeable minority of Muslims living in western society. ISIS wants to show that it's not possible for Muslims to live in the western world. Their method is to perform terrorist attacks in the hope it will cause a backlash against Muslims living in the western world. ISIS states this ...


117

This question seems a little like why do terrorists commit terror? The aim of a terrorist group isn't usually to be left alone, but more to provoke conflict, or as a form of violent protest against what they believe is a wrong. You are mistaken when you claim terrorism only do temporary physical damage The value in a terrorist attack isn't really the ...


99

The name Islamic State is a claim to a global caliphate. This claim is rejected by everybody else, from western leaders to Muslim leaders, to other Islamic extremists. "so-called" is added to make it clear that this is not an objective or descriptive term, but a self-chosen label which does not reflect the true nature of a group. It happens with other ...


68

Because Pape doesn't know what he's talking about. Islamic jihadist groups Boko Haram and Al Shabbab terrorize African communities in Kenya, Nigeria, Mali, Somalia, Chad, Cameroon, Niger, and Tanzania- which of those countries is engaged in military occupation? The Iraqi Yazidis are terrorized by ISIS - and they don't even have a state or army. Or how ...


44

First of all, ISIS claims that "killing kafirs is always good". Official ISIS Announcement on Brussels Attacks First we want to make it clear to all that what makes the kafir’s blood permissiable to spill is not him fighting the Muslims, rather it is his “KUFR” that necessitates his killing. So if one asks, can you kill a Kafir (who does not fight ...


36

Because they (Daesh) claim that their government is "Islamic State", but they consider most of Muslims as polytheist or infidel, and on the other hand, the majority of Muslims all over the world consider them to be fake Muslims. We face with two facts: On the one hand they (Daesh) are known in the media as "Islamic State", so in order to talk about them ...


33

Many answers here are attempting to answer your question in a similar perspective, and they are all extremely interesting and most of them seem very well documented. What I'll offer you is an attempt to destabilize some "absolutes" that emerge from both your question and most of the answers that I do not find so obvious. Forgive me if this is a rebuttal-...


24

Because they don't pose an immediate threat that needs to be countered ASAP ISIS isn't a tangible current threat to Israel's existence. They are definitely a threat to Syria or Iraq strategically. They pose varied levels of threat to other Middle East countries. But they don't have the military capability to attack Israel as a fighting force, not anytime ...


22

A short answer is the last paragraph. Born and raised as a Muslim, though I am more inclined to defend my lifestyle choices with progressist politics, rather than entities with extra-political world views, like ISIS, I shall attempt to answer your question. First, ISIS doesn't do all the attacks (it just claims to do so) and not mainly for ...


21

Islamic State oil is being sold to organized criminals in Turkey, who conceal the oil's origin and sell it on the open market. This activity was spearheaded by Saddam Hussein's Iraq as a means to circumvent the oil embargo. It is an open question to what extent Turkey is deliberately allowing this to occur.


21

One reason for provoking powerful opponents is to establish in the eyes of potential recruits that you are a powerful organization that can accomplish what other organizations cannot. Doing this may cause recruits or financing sources to support your cause because they think highly of your group relative to others that "play it safe" by comparison. ...


18

I think there may be a couple of components to this Israel has excellent defenses and is very strict regarding points of entry into their territory. It's plausible that DAESH has attempted to penetrate and Israel has detained those individuals as high risk, which they do without trial on a regular basis when it comes to Palestinians. Israel is not waging ...


17

'America has no permanent friends or enemies, only interests' - Henry Kissinger, US Secretary of State It serves US government's interests (which, to dig one hole deeper, MAY or MAY NOT be the same as "America's interests") to support Sunni rebels in Syria. More specifically, the reasons are both: domestic: Al-Assad is seen as a brutal mass-homicidal ...


17

There are a variety of reasons: ISIS is quite happy with the status quo of Israel attacking, or at least putting pressure on, their main tactical enemies (Shia block in general, in the personification of Hezbollah). If it wasn't for Israel, Hezbollah could have sent a significantly more overwhelming force from Lebanon into Syria. ISIS has a finite amount of ...


16

Why does ISIL attempt to provoke a fight they cannot win? The answer is simple. much of what the group does looks nonsensical except in light of a sincere, carefully considered commitment to returning civilization to a seventh-century legal environment, and ultimately to bringing about the apocalypse. This summary comes from a widely circulated ...


15

I'll preface this by saying that I think this is a good question. Those who disagree probably oppose IS on an "us vs them" principle not an ideological one. I oppose them because I don't believe that what they want is desirable. For one thing, it's very Islamic-based and I'm an atheist. Let's cover morality first. It's important to remember that the Islamic ...


15

You might find this article useful. It lists some of the reasons. There's a lot it doesn't say, though, so I'll try to cover this adequately. First, understand a couple of things. Islamic State is not a political force as much as it is a military/religious one. This means that they might do stupid things (and many agree that beheading these people as a ...


15

There's a big assumption in the question. Was Belgium the original intended target? Or did these terrorists, who were mostly from Brussels and had been using Brussels as a base since before the Paris attacks, for many reasons, particularly disorganised security... justice system and intelligence services are split... six different police zones... ...


15

This is a specifically BBC policy, that some other outlets are following. The general policy at the BBC is to use the name for a group that is generally understood, and that the group itself uses. When Daesh were first expanding in Syria and Iraq, there were two names in somewhat widespread use: ISIS and ISIL, both of which are abbreviations of possible ...


14

The government of Turkey. Though this is hotly contested, there is some direct evidence and much circumstantial evidence to suggest that the Turkish government has at the very least facilitated/mediated the purchase of oil from IS (if not actually buying oil itself). Oil tankers - illustration The basic circumstantial evidence: The oil exports can (...


14

ISIS has limited options, they can't strike at just any location they would ideally want to hit. ISIS has to recruit people who are willing to do their bidding, these people have to be able to make bombs and be able to carry out a successful attack. They have to be able to form a network that won't be noticed by law enforcement. This means that ISIS will ...


14

It's important to remember that each nation and indeed group has its own objectives, and often they are conflicting. What's happening isn't the world versus the Islamic State, it's a patchwork quilt of different colours of resistance. This is a very informative chart produced late 2014. In it we see that even those nations contributing military forces ...


13

First of all, the US is not supporting ISIS (or ISIL or IS, as it's also called) in Syria. The presence of extremist elements among militant groups in Syria is one of the major reasons why the Obama administration has been so cautious about giving weapons to Syria rebels. This concern seems to be widespread among the US political leadership (for example, it ...


13

Brussels is also the center of Europe, and therefore a desirable symbolic target. From both the ISIS terrorist's point of view and that of Europe's warmongering elite, looking for public support for their future endeavors.


12

This is not a complete answer, just what I gathered so far through the media. IS are equipped with U.S. heavy weapons. This is why Pershmerga got so much more successful when supported by air strikes; the strikes took out the armor, then the lightly armed Peshmerga took out the fighters. We will see how this plays out when Pershmerga fully deploys their ...


12

PointlessSpike has given an excellent answer, but I would like to add another argument that has a strong power in a period of chaos. In fact ISIS is not as unique as many believes, there is a group that has achieved similar levels of brutality in the past: the Wahhabi sect. From Wahhabism: In 1901, Abdul-Aziz Ibn Saud, a fifth generation descendent of ...


11

A few personal thoughts on this topic. Turkish army has to go through the Kurds' lands. That seems impossible without fighting against Kurds first. And that would be both troublesome and frown upon by USA. Turkey has no national interest in fighting against ISIS. They are not a threat for Turkey for a moment. Only media make people think of "good guys" and "...


11

The reason for the disagreement about how to call the world's least favorite terrorist group is that the group changed its own name several times and because their native tongue isn't English, so there are disagreements about the correct translation: 2006-2013: ISI (Islamic State of Iraq), sometimes refered to as "al-Qaeda in Iraq" 2013-2014: DAIISH or ...


10

Jizya is the tax given by non Muslims for the protection given by Islamic state. Number of groups are exempt from giving this like monks, poor, women, old people etc. So wealthy Muslims are required to pay Zakath and wealthy non muslims are required to give Jizya. Other than being a tax for government, one purpose of Jizya is that they recognize the state ...


10

Here are some stats from the University of Chicago (Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism): 1 - Attacks by location: 2 - Attacks by year: 3 - Attacks by campaign: And here are the contribution of each attack vector (i.e: casualties by weapon used): In other words: These organizations are taking advantage of several factors: Counterterrorism costs ...


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