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The involvement of ISIS in terrorist attacks on the West is actually more limited than one might expect. Especially when excluding those attacks that weren't planned by ISIS, but "only" inspired by them, they mostly focused their terror attacks on the middle east (see also this map; this approach differentiates them from eg Al Qaeda). Of the ...


13

It's extremely difficult to get into the specific motivations of individual actors or even organizations, absent explicit statements - which are often of questionable credibility if the speaker knows their statement will be available to public scrutiny. This thesis lays out a review of the relevant literature on the matter, and identifies five main ...


3

They were at the time losing the open war in Syria. The terrorist attacks drew away attention from those losses. Map of IS-controlled territories by the BBC:


2

As an aspiring political scientist, the answer is rather disheartening. A policy to "never negotiate with terrorists" actually benefits the terrorists. The reason is simple: when no terrorists are negotiated with, a "pooling equilibrium" is created that throws all of the soft-liners in with the hard-liners. This happens because the people ...


2

I once read that one of the goals of the terrorist attacks is to make Muslim minorities in Western countries feel hostile and not welcome in their environment. To some extent, they want to provoke people in Western countries (with different beliefs or no beliefs at all) to perform hate crimes against Muslim minorities as an act of revenge. By turning into ...


2

This is a more complex question than one might realize. The modern political world (since the early 20th century) has been marked by a dramatic increase in the power and efficiency of national military and police forces, both in terms of military hardware and surveillance capabilities. This has pushed counter-national movements to organize as partisan forces:...


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