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40

In theory there could be a secular, multi-ethnic, multi-religious state. In practice that is all but impossible. After the Holocaust, many Jews vowed to live in their own state defended by their own army. I find that desire understandable. Two millenia ago, the Jews were scattered by the Romans from their ancient homelands. People who lived there since ...


37

Many Germans who have friends and family really enjoy the fact that there is one "common day off" in the week which is the same for all family members. Going to church together has become rather uncommon, but the benefit for the family remains. Of course one cannot go shopping together on this "common day off," but that's where the golden rule comes in -- ...


35

Following the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza in 2005, Hamas gained power there. Hamas and other militant groups received shipments of foreign rockets and other weapons, largely from Iran. Such rockets were frequently fired into Israel over the ensuing years. Israel is eager not to repeat this experience with respect to the West Bank. If a similar arsenal of ...


28

It's not at all clear that countries even have official recognition of other countries' designated capitals; all that really happens is that a place for the embassy is chosen. One of the first tools of diplomacy is not saying what you don't have to (the second being not saying much of what you do have to) so an announcement that "we're moving our embassy ...


26

The idea of Israel controlling the Jordan River valley as part of a long term peace agreement goes back to 1967, just about after the six days war. It was central part of the Allon Plan that was presented to the Israeli government only weeks after the war ended. The goal of the plan was to accommodate for Israeli security by keeping the Judea and Samaria ...


25

The process of forming a government in Israel (which never in its history saw a single party win an outright majority, so there were always coalition governments) is that Israel's president, after consulting with the party leaderships, nominates whoever he thinks has the best chance to form a government. That nominee has 42 days to put together a (coalition) ...


23

I'm not familiar with Germany but there's a similar law in France, and I guess in a few other countries. The law is amended from time to time and there are quite a lot of exemptions, but the general case is still that most businesses must close every Sunday, and in particular that employees cannot be asked to work on a Sunday. In France at least the debate ...


19

Have any credible/influential Palestinian/Arabs indicated that that subject would be up for compromise? Even unofficially? Yes. According to this BBC article: In 2002, Sari Nusseibeh, an academic and former representative of the PLO in Jerusalem controversially proposed a settlement where Palestinian refugees would only be able to return to a Palestinian ...


19

Yes, most certainly. The UN (though, not a country, a good starting example) officially doesn't recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital: The United Nations General Assembly does not recognize Israel's proclamation of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, which is, for example, reflected in the wording of General Assembly Resolution 63/30 of 2009 which ...


18

Because a lot of these sorts of statements have context that you are missing If you take a look at these sentences as abstract collections of words that are completely divorced from all prior human history, they might not seem so bad. Unfortunately, there is subtext in all of them that usually implies that Jews are not worthy of being normal members of ...


15

You have to understand what Zionism is about. It is about creating and maintaining a Jewish state. According to Zionism, that requires Jews to be the dominant ethnic group. Most Israeli Jews are Zionists and reject the idea of a binational state because Jewish dominance over it cannot be ensured. The sentiment is well described in this essay by Daniel ...


13

I know you asked about Germany, but, since the purpose of your question is to ask about government-enforced holidays as a north-american secular myself I would encourage you to look up the history of "blue laws" in the US. The last time I checked, Bergen County of NJ (the one right outside of NYC) still makes it virtually illegal to open retail ...


12

None. Looking through Wikipedia's article on the plan and Al Jazeera's summary, the reactions can be summarized as: Bahrain: noncommittal Egypt: neutral Iraq: no statement Jordan: opposed Kuwait: opposed Lebanon: no statement Oman: no statement Palestine: opposed Qatar: opposed Saudi Arabia: opposed Syria: no statement United Arab Emirates: neutral Yemen: ...


12

Most countries recognise the 1967 borders set by the UN. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Security_Council_Resolution_242 The resolution doesn't specify a capital and I therefore the closest you will find is where the embassies lie. This is also why the movement of the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in 2018 was controversial.


9

It appears that the law wasn't prompted by specific issues but by a general desire to encode Israel's civil rights, previously protected only at common law, in constitutional legislation. This started in 1992, with the Human Dignity and Liberty Law and Freedom of Occupation Law. Freedom of Occupation had already been protected in common law by a 1949 Supreme ...


8

Jews [are] more loyal to Israel than to their own country This is quite obviously a problematic statement; let me rephrase the statement a couple of times to make that a little more obvious: All Catholics are loyal to the Pope and by extension to their Catholic church or even the Vatican; more so than to their home country Chinese and Japanese ...


8

In Germany, even without the Ladenschlussgesetz, working Sundays is constitutionally forbidden under Artikel 140 Grundgesetz (footnote 139) unless altered by law. So shops wouldn't necessarily be able to open on Sundays. Atop that there is the Arbeitszeitgesetz (ArbZG) ยง9 Abs. 1, which again forbids working on Sundays. It does however provision to allow it ...


8

In the past, there have been more hopeful moments, such as after Oslo. However, one massive problem at the time was the insistence on a right of return. Another way to characterize the situation is that Israel's refusal to allow the Arab Palestinian refugee population to return to their former homes is a massive problem. Regardless of one's sympathy for ...


7

The difference is in enforcement. Since 2006 regulating shopping hours is the concern of the state -- not of the federal German government. Since then, states have loosened their restrictions on shopping hours and business are not fined for violating the rules. But in Israel they have been. For example in Ashdod: The Ashdod municipality toughened its ...


6

There is no law on the books in Israel to stop a third round of elections from taking place, should attempts to form a government fail once again. Thus, should the process described by @Fizz in answer 1 fail, it may be necessary to hold elections again, unless a new law is formulated in the interim.


6

Given the complexity and sensitivity of the situation, unambiguous support for any first-proposal agreement would be highly unlikely. The following states from the region offered support for the effort to open negotiations. Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia's King Salman reassured the Kingdom's commitment to the Palestinian issue and Palestinian rights, in a ...


6

Russia and Australia view Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Most countries have no official position on this topic. The embassies of Guatemala and the US are in Jerusalem. The location of embassies is not a definitive statement on considering some city the capital. The US embassy of Bolivia is in La Paz, not the capital Sucre. (La Paz is considered the '...


5

Before the Six Day War in 1967, the West Bank (a name given by Jordan to the territories under its control west of the Jordan River) was completely under hostile, enemy control. The width of Israel's heartland, from the sea until the [at the time enemy state of] Jordan was only 9 miles. Also, the West Bank consists of hills and highlands that overlook Tel ...


5

Not only no Arab country supports Trump's peace plan, on February 1st the Arab League stated that it unambiguously rejects it: The Arab League foreign ministers meeting in Cairo said the plan did not meet the minimum aspirations of Palestinians, and the League would not cooperate with the US in implementing it. The ministers affirmed Palestinian ...


5

I don't follow Israeli politics closely, but based an AP report: most parties probably see Netanyahu's position eroding further with the anti-corruption investigation targeting him Lieberman, who toppled the coalition by insisting on ending the draft exemption for the ultra-orthodox Jews, apparently hopes to gain more seats by championing this cause which ...


5

The US position is "back to Reagan" basically, In 1978, the Jimmy Carter administration concluded that the establishment of civilian settlements was inconsistent with international law. In 1981, President Ronald Reagan disagreed with that conclusion, saying he did not believe the settlements were inherently illegal. Since then, the US adopted a ...


5

A country that can be a republic - with a constitution - so that the rights of minorities are protected - and there can be a country with multiple religions and ethnicities? That's what Israel already is. Israel is a parliamentary republic with a constitution which protects human rights. It has a significant Arab minority (21%) who have equal rights. It ...


5

Israel can not accept a bi-national or a single democratic country including Palestinians for the following pragmatic reasons A .Demography Currently Palestinians population is estimated to be 13 million, among which 5 million estimated to be refugees. current Israel population is 8.7 million with 21% among them Arab Israelis (Palestinians who were giving ...


5

I suspect that polling in the Palestinian territories is somewhat iffy to conduct, but what there is shows that there's little support for a (democratic) one-state solution among either of the populations involved. As what the solutions should be, opinions differ based on political & religious affiliations to some extent, but the "one democratic state" ...


5

Have any credible/influential Palestinian/Arabs indicated that that subject would be up for compromise? Even unofficially? No. The fundamental principles for Palestinians are The right of return East Jerusalem as a capital the right to resistance https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thawabit


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