159

@POTUS, according to Twitter (https://www.wsj.com/articles/twitter-says-it-is-permanently-suspending-account-of-president-trump-11610148903), is the 'official' account for the Office of the President of the United States. It is a de facto arm of the executive branch in the same way that any other public-communications aspect of the office would be. (...


133

The Democrats strongly supported voting by mail due to Covid-19, to avoid risk of infection, while Trump downplayed the pandemic. ScienceDaily: COVID-19 opens a partisan gap on voting by mail This is a case in Texas where Democrats attempted to extend mail voting: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/26/coronavirus-supreme-court-rejects-universal-vote-by-mail-in-...


125

Donald Trump spent months making statements, to the media and on Twitter, along the lines of: Mail-in ballots are very dangerous. There’s tremendous fraud involved and tremendous illegality. (source) It's hardly surprising that Republican voters decided to take him at his word and not trust mail-in ballots.


92

Because the Trump campaign crossed a line in 2016. Before this point it was generally accepted, in American politics, that politicians and candidates did not use words such as "stupid" or "insane" when talking about one another. In return, it was fairly uncommon for the "proper" news media to use such terms when talking about ...


86

In May of 2020, Biden committed not to pardon Trump or otherwise interfere with any investigations that the Justice Department may or may not carry out: Democratic candidate Joe Biden said that if he wins the presidency he would not use his power to pardon Donald Trump or stop any investigations of Trump and his associates. “It is not something the ...


68

In the fifth Democratic debate from Atlanta on November 20th 2019, Biden was consulted on this issue by moderator Rachel Maddow. He responded that he would leave the decision up to the Attorney General, and that he would follow their advice on the matter. He was pressed on the issue by Bernie Sanders, however, he maintained his position that the decision of ...


63

I think the other answers are correct in that both of these are factors: Trump and some of the Republican leadership (repeatedly) slamming postal voting Republicans being less afraid of Covid-19 and thus less inclined to socially distance (also reflected in some of Trump's comments on the pandemic and his personal example) Alas answers (and comments) have ...


57

I suppose that I disagree with the framing of the question. I would argue that Trump's mental health and intelligence are frequently criticized. There are a plethora of news articles characterizing him as poorly educated, incurious, not terribly bright, or even possibly having some sort of mental illness. For instance, from the Atlantic, Trump does not read ...


52

According to Wikipedia: Office of the President-Elect logos first began to be used by the Obama transition team in 2008 And Trump apparently also used one (same source): N.B. while that logo lacks the words "office of", there's a photo of Trump in front of a larger thingy that has the words too: And (to answer a comment), the same source has a ...


51

Trump arguably won the 2016 election because of James Comey's last-minute, pre-election assertion that he might reopen the investigation into Hillary Clinton. That had dramatic fallout in social media, and Clinton never effectively addressed it before the election; in my estimation it cost her enough votes to shift the tide. Hunter Biden and Burisma is "...


47

Yes, though it's not a meaningful statement. According to the results by state on wikipedia (2016 results and 2020 results), Biden received more votes than Clinton in every state, not just the ones he won. Of course, Trump received more votes in every state in 2020 than he did in 2016 too – turnout was just really high across the board. Slightly more ...


42

The Trump campaign did a lot to demonize mail in voting with accusations that there was a lot of fraud with it. This along with the downplaying of covid among his supporters likely led to a lower mail in voting turnout and higher in person turnout. There was a concern among Republicans that the campaign against mail in voting would cost votes in the long run....


38

No, because none of the reasons you've given for why it might happen are true it seems likely to me that Trump won't leave the White House voluntarily. As JoeW says above, he has no choice. At most he can actively oppose the country being governed over the next couple of months, but that's it. When the time runs out, he can legally be removed, by force ...


35

In a real landslide, Biden would not "just" win the presidency: He'd also win Texas, Florida, Ohio, and all the other battleground states that went for Trump. He'd win by such a margin that Trump disputing the election results (via lawsuits) would be laughably futile. Maybe he'd even win a state nobody thought he would win, such as Utah. The ...


35

As others have pointed out, the last two presidents — Obama and Trump — used signage for the Office of the President-Elect, so that is not Biden's invention. More to the point, however, the President-Elect has held a de facto government office for a long time: certainly since the Presidential Transition Act of 1963, and informally for decades before that ...


35

Well, at the very least Eric Feigin - the Deputy Solicitor General who responded to Barrett's question - argued that the positions aren't contradictory. The administration's position is that the current moratorium on executions is in place to enable a review of the current execution protocol, that the judgement of the jury in the first instance should be ...


32

A short piece on PolitiFact published at the time in 2016 put Biden's 1992 speech in its political context: Biden's floor speech was on June 25, 1992, more than three months later in the election cycle than it is now. There was no Supreme Court vacancy to fill. There was no nominee to consider. The Senate never took a vote to adopt a rule to delay ...


31

There aren't numbers for the first 100 days AFAIK, but The American Presidency Project has a feature that tracks these numbers by year, dating back to President Calvin Coolidge. President Biden has held less formal news conferences in his first year as compared to past Presidents. However, these numbers exclude impromptu interactions with the press which was ...


30

The answer is consistency. If you look at videos of Trump campaigning 5 years ago he looks approximately the same as he looks today. His speech patterns in 2015 were odd, but they remain odd in 2020. Likewise his physical appearance remains similar - he started out looking unhealthy and continues to look so today, but not any worse than 4 years ago. ...


25

By only tweeting official things from @POTUS, Biden isn't making @JoeBiden a public forum. A circuit court ruled that Donald Trump's use of his personal Twitter account for public statements meant that blocking people on it contravened their First Amendment rights.


22

There are two different election strategies at play, mostly aimed at two different kinds of people. This is to be expected in most elections but the tunes that the two parties are playing are so obviously different this year that it is being noted. The Republican campaign essentially continued its strategy from 2016 with minor tweaks. Then, the key point of ...


22

Generally speaking, yes, the presidential motorcade travels 'with' the president. In actuality it's shipped ahead of his arrival, in military transports designed for armored vehicles. I don't have evidence to support any direct claim for this exact visit, but it's far more likely than not that the motorcade consisted of Secret Service fleet vehicles, ...


21

I think you are maybe misunderstanding the extent to which the rules on superdelegates changed. The rule change which was voted through in August 2018 did not stop superdelegates from voting for who they wanted, but instead barred them from voting in the first ballot, and then only if there is no clear winner from the national primaries & caucuses. In ...


21

The Polling Systemically Overestimated Democratic Results At Unprecedented Levels The polling in the 2020 election had systematic problems that caused them to under-measure support for Republicans and Trump to a greater extent than any past election in more than a decade (including the 2016 election which was the runner up), and to over estimate support in ...


21

No, Biden is not the first to do it. While the Office of the President-elect is not a real governmental office, the role of the President-elect is stated in the Presidential Transition Act of 1963. Recent presidential transitions have all set up offices named the "Office of the President-elect". Presidential transition of Barack Obama (2008) from ...


21

Persons who voted for Joe Biden over Donald Trump tend to be younger, paid less, and more in favor of masks/less likely of voting in person during a pandemic. Younger people tend to have less schedule flexibility as they are still working their way up in the corporate world (or are working non-9-to-5 hours in the retail/service sectors). This would lead them ...


19

For the Trump campaign, the aim is to project and deflect from concerns about Trump's own mental competence. For the Biden campaign, it's likely a combination of a desire to appear "above the fray" and a sense that everyone who can be moved by concerns about Trump's mental competence already has been. There's a popular quote attributed alternately ...


17

The "Biden Rule" wasn't some kind of formal Senate rule, but rather was merely referring to the course of action that Biden himself suggested in 1992 that you mentioned, namely, not taking up a nomination during the election season. The name, of course, was used by Republicans just to point out the hypocrisy of the administration (and Senate ...


17

In short, we don't know why polls were off with a fair argument made on the polls being 'good enough'. In many ways, the polling error was within acceptable margins. I've been listening and reading the 538 overviews of polls for this year's election, and they pretty much say that there was no big problem (and that the result was not that close) but numerous ...


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