47

Because the majority of the people voted for Brexit. In fact, this reason is given in the very first line of the Party's 2017 manifesto, in the Brexit chapter: Labour accepts the referendum result and a Labour government will put the national interest first. Thus, ex-post the referendum, the Labour Party accepts it because it is the will of the voters. ...


46

Because Labour gets more seats with regional representation. Even the famed Tony Blair landslide majorities were never actually a popular majority. In 2005, Labour won 55% of the seats with 35% of the vote. In 2001, Labour won 63% of the seats with 41% of the vote. In 1997, Labour won 63% of the seats with 43% of the vote. And even when Labour doesn't ...


37

You can read (all 850 pages) yourself! The conclusions as stated in the report are: Labour party structures were not equipped to deal with [anti-semitism] An abnormal intensity of factional opposition to the Party leader during this time inhibited the proper functioning of the Labour Party bureaucracy. Party management was for several years unequal to the ...


27

The Wikipedia article on Anisemitism in Labour has a good overview (the following list is not complete): Corbyn was the chair of an organization that participated in the antisemitic Quds Day. Corbyn has called the antisemitic terrorist organization Hamas "friends" (which he now regrets). Corbyn was a member of multiple antisemitic facebook groups (...


26

There is a strategic reason, and a philosophical reason, but they are related: With something like the current range of views in the UK, it is very unlikely that Labour could ever win a majority under PR. They would need to form a coalition, and probably a 3-way coalition with the Liberals and the SNP. And while there is some political overlap between the ...


24

In the UK system, the speaker is politically neutral, and this requirement of neutrality has been taken seriously by generations of speakers. Moreover it is quite common for the speaker not to be from the majority party. The speaker is not a governmental position, and it is quite common for the speaker to come from a minority party. The current Westminster ...


22

At the moment the issue seems to be less one of policy and more one of narrative. The Conservative Government is currently in charge of delivering Brexit. Nearly two years after the vote to Leave the EU, we still have no idea what a deal is going to look like in, well basically any particular. This is compounded by the resignation today of Britain's chief ...


15

Has the Labour party always had this level of problems with anti-semitism? No. The current problems are a direct result of the changes brought about by Jeremy Corbyn. This is not, however, to suggest that Mr Corbyn is anti-Jewish. The reason for this assertion is as follows. From the late 1960's onwards, the Middle East was a central proxy for the Cold War....


14

He didn't. Although this quote is often misattributed to Benn, including recently in the House of Commons itself by Bell Ribeiro-Addy MP (Hansard), the quote actually comes from the Scottish journalist and writer Neal Ascherson. Writing for the Independent in January 1996, Ascherson describes his take on the al-Masari affair in an article entitled If we ...


12

Since 2015 when Jeremy Corbyn took over the leadership of the Labour party, it has been beset by accusations of antisemitism. The instances are detailed in multiple articles and questions on the site. In summary, after a very slow start following the Chakrabarti report, where many recommendations were not acted on for two years, the Labour party has taken ...


12

Something else to consider: People vote differently in different voting systems. Right now, a lot of people vote for either Labour or the Conservatives not because they actually want to vote for them, but because a vote for some smaller party would be "wasted" under FPTP. Under PR that's no longer a consideration and I predict you'd see a massive ...


11

TL;DR: defining when criticism of Israel becomes anti-Semitism First things first, please do note that generalizations are that, generalizations. The point that I am going to disagree with the idea that attitudes towards anti-Semitism have changed does not mean that there cannot be cases of genuine anti-Semites in the Labour party (or in any other group of ...


10

I think the notion that Labour supports Brexit needs to be nuanced a little. There's a May 2018 opinion piece in the Guardian (by prof. Anand Menon) that describes Labour's support for Brexit as "strategic ambiguity" because while supporting the result of the referendum, the LP doesn't really have its own clear plan for how Brexit should happen. As you ...


9

The least ambiguous source for this might be page 90 of the Labour Party manifesto for the 2017 General Election Labour will invest in a modern, integrated, accessible and sustainable transport system that is reliable and a affordable. Our transport systems illustrate the abject failure of Tory policies: relentless deregulation, privatisation and ...


9

This may be a ridiculous suggestion, but it's possible that not all politicians are cynical. 😉 The question's premise is that Proportional Representation would be in the Labour Party's selfish interest, and other answers have looked at whether that premise is true. But even if it was true, that might not be sufficient reason to adopt it as policy: after all,...


8

We won't know in more detail until some polls on "why did you vote that way" are published (and I haven't found any insofar, but some were published after the 2017 election, so no doubt some will be published for this one too), however what we do know are some correlations with the Brexit vote: Labour lost votes in both strong Remain and strong ...


7

Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the Labour Party is a left-winger, far removed politically from the Blairite side of the party. There is a long tradition of the left of the Labour Party having opposed Britain's membership of the EU, and prior to that the EEC. At the time of the 1974 referendum, figures like Tony Benn opposed our joining the EEC, and sat on ...


7

The most recent poll on the subject of a potential EU referendum was conducted by Survation on 25 September. Of voters who intend to vote Labour at the next General Election, 15% of them say they would vote to Leave in a subsequent referendum, compared to 77% who would vote Remain, and 8% undecided. This is down slightly from Survation's last poll before ...


6

Did the 2017 manifesto represent an actual change in policy from 2015? Yes. In the absence of a clear manifesto commitment to a policy, it is harder for Labour to claim it has an electoral mandate to implement it. Most importantly, under the Salisbury Convention the Lords does not block legislation which would enact a manifesto commitment. Why did ...


6

There are some possible reasons listed here. We could do with an official explanation from Labour HQ. So far all I've been able to interpret from various soundbites and putting 2+2 together is that: they are desperate to win they think the bill contains some items that the public would agree with they are scared their reasons for opposing would be ...


6

First the disclaimer - I am involved in politics, and a member of the Labour Party, as well as a trade union member (not of unite) Unite the union is an amalgamation of a number of different trade Unions that have merged over time. http://www.unitetheunion.org/growing-our-union/about-us/history/ They and other unions such as my own (Unison) have a long ...


6

Candidates are selected by the Constituency Labour Parties, following the plan outlined in the Labour Party Rule Book. The last version I can find online is from 2013. This states that in terms of rights to select "All individual eligible members of the party with continuous membership of at least six months (who reside in the electoral area concerned) are ...


6

There's no ERG equivalent on Labour's end. But there are a few Labour MPs who are staunch Leavers, either on a personal basis, or because they represent constituencies that voted heavily for Leave during the referendum, or because they're concerned about the damage that not leaving might do to the UK and its institutions. As a result, a handful Labour MPs ...


6

Was there "such a marked shift"? In 2019 Labour ultimately committed to hold a 2nd referendum in which the party (or at least its leadership) would not support either remain/leave... which most of the electorate found bewildering and unconvincing. Labour lost Leave votes to the Conservatives and Remain votes to the Lib Dems (who couldn't turn them ...


6

This was the Labour Party conference where a number of policies that were previously seen as extreme were either passed as policy or were at least heavily supported. These included:- Removing the choice of party leader from MPs and moving to an Electoral College. Unilateral nuclear disarmament by the United Kingdom Withdrawal from the EEC Abolition of the ...


5

Under the current rules a new candidate for the Labour leadership requires the support of 20% of Labour MPs and MEPs (members of the European parliament). This would equate to 50 signatures from 230 MPs and 20 MEPs. There appears to be some uncertainty as to whether this is also true for an incumbent. The difficulty apparently comes down to rule Rule 4.2.ii ...


5

Here's the Labour Party's constitution: http://labour.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Rule-Book-2019.pdf The relevant section is Chapter 3, Clause III, Rule 3 - Procedural Rules for the Party Conference, voting. The rule begins: Voting at Party conference on resolutions, reports, amendments, proposals and references back shall be by show of hands or, ...


5

I'm guessing it has everything to do with the power structure of the Labour party. For example, Wikipedia says A vote of no confidence in Corbyn was made by the parliamentary party on 28 June [2016], with Corbyn losing the vote by 172 to 40, with four spoiled ballots and thirteen absentees. However Labour Party rules did not require Corbyn to resign as a ...


5

It is considered so serious that the Equality and Human Rights Commission has opened an investigation into it (the EHRC will report in 2020). Initially: Having received a number of complaints regarding antisemitism in the Labour Party, we believe the Labour Party may have unlawfully discriminated against people because of their ethnicity and religious ...


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