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1

None of the DOJ's Rule 13 letters to the FISC have ever been made public, however as the Court's declassified ruling refers to one dated December 9, 2019, no doubt it exists. The letter may not have contained a specific conclusion saying the last two FISA warrants were invalid, but the Court is making clear it has interpreted the admissions in the letter ...


2

It was a direct result of the FISA court hearing about the two warrants. It would appear the lawyers representing the Justice department made the determination during the hearing. The Department of Justice admitted in December that two of the FBI’s four surveillance warrants to electronically monitor ex-Trump campaign adviser Carter Page were invalid, ...


24

Well, Wikipedia has a pretty detailed explanation on this: Alsace-Moselle maintains its own local legislation, applying specific customs and laws on certain issues in spite of its being an integral part of France. These laws are principally in areas that France addressed by changing its own law in the period 1871–1919, when Alsace-Moselle was a part of ...


4

Actually, not paying those who conduct religious service is not the same thing as no state money whatsoever going to religious organizations. Since 1959, the French government pays the salaries of teachers in private schools, most of which are religious, and gives subsidies directly to those schools. So unless something has changed in that respect, the ...


1

The source of this cultural difference is, at least partly, in the Cultural Revolution. (I will refer to this as CR in the remainder.) But it is also much older than that in Chinese culture. The concept is referred to as guan xi. (关系 in simplified Chinese.) This translates as "relationship." But it means a lot more than that. In the book "Life and Death in ...


3

The Washington Post reported yesterday that the Huber review is winding up but not yet closed officially. Current and former officials said that Huber has largely finished and found nothing worth pursuing — though the assignment has not formally ended and no official notice has been sent to the Justice Department or to lawmakers, these people said. ...


4

It's a basic cultural difference of approach. The Chinese simply don't understand why they can't use and share things right in front of them, like retelling a good joke. If something is good, they want to share it with people; what's the point of discovery in secret? This attitude stems from a collective culture, in stark contrast to the individualism of ...


7

“Intellectual Property” is a fairly new concept in China, with most of the laws dating only from the 1980's and 90's, so the idea of piracy=bad isn't as entrenched as it is in the West. Also, China is still generally poorer than Western Europe or North America, making people less willing to spend the extra money for legitimately-licenced ...


2

According to a Wikipedia article in Russian (they cite specific legislation), there are mostly two criteria: Participate in political activity Receive funding (or any property) from foreign governments, companies, persons, or even persons without any citizenship There does not appear to be any threshold, though you may want to check the actual law (which ...


1

With the audit results now released, it seems pretty clear the answer is no, the 2019 audit of FBI Confidential Human Sources (CHS) processes was not prompted by President Trump, nor any of his appointees. As stated in the final report: "This audit primarily covers the FBI's CHS program from fiscal year (FY) 2012 through May 2019." It appears to be follow-...


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