81

One difference is that the trial (and, behind it, criminal prosecution and legal punishment) is something the state is organising for its own purpose in the first place. The right to a speedy trial is not a right to a trial or anything along those lines, it is a limitation on the conditions under which the state can apply punishment and restrict someone's ...


56

There is not an invisible market force that makes monopolies go away. In fact, the longer that a monopoly operates unabated, the more reserve cash it accumulates, the more it refines its infrastructure and process, the more brand recognition it continuously accumulates. So the longer a monopoly exists, the harder it is to compete with it, and the easier ...


55

The first important thing to notice is that political labels mean different things in different parts of the world and in different points of time. In contemporary US politics libertarian is usually used to describe a set of political values that advocate liberal social policies with conservative economic policies. This means they don't fit neatly on a left/...


46

The word "libertarianism" was essentially invented because classical liberals felt that the word had become expropriated. Leonard E. Reed wrote in Castles in the Air: There was a word that I always liked; the classical economists used it: liberal. The word liberal really meant, in the classical sense, the liberalization of the individuals from the ...


42

The high level reason is fairly simple. DNC poses more of a threat to libertarian ideals and way of life than GOP. The main philosophical concern of Libertarians is reduction of violence (or a threat of violence) and coercion in political life. All of the other things that characterize libertarians stem from that high level point. In practice, the main ...


42

The right to a speedy trial just means that the prosecutor may not delay the trial unreasonably. The prosecutor is not actually required to provide a trial. The trial is a requirement to keep the defendant incarcerated or otherwise limited, e.g. by a bail agreement. So a speedy trial is a limitation on the prosecutorial power. If tried, the trial must be ...


41

The "classical" libertarian solution to this dilemma is simple: If a business wishes to discriminate non-violently, they are free to do so... Some libertarians have a curious point of view that calling police to remove a gay couple from a private place is considered "violent" - in other words, a business is free to request gays to leave the premises, but ...


41

Libertarianism is neither Left nor Right-wing. It's on a spectrum opposite of Authoritarianism. So, as you go further towards Authoritarian, you want more and more government control and intervention in society. As you go further in the opposite direction on this spectrum, you want less government control and smaller government. This means that as a ...


36

Perhaps the single, most fundamental principle within libertarian thought is voluntarism. Almost all other libertarian ideals (freedom of contracts, autonomous judgement, informed consent, individual freedom, labor theory of property, etc.) are philosophically derived from this principle. The best society is the one in which all people are maximally free to ...


35

As requested in comments, converting my own comments to a brief answer: First of all, there's no generic concept of "monopoly" and thus libertarian views on such will vary. The following aspects of monopolistic situations are distinct: 1. "Natural" monopolies Most frequent argument by proponents of antitrust and those using "monopoly&...


30

Same way CFC problem was addressed. As you will notice if you look at the detail of the issue (e.g., this blog post - which is overall very pro-regulation and pro-environmentalism and aggressively anti-free-market), CFC regulation by the government happened after the CFC market shrunk more than 75% already. In other words, 75% of the problem was solved by ...


27

First of all, as usual in politics, you got definition confusions galore. For one thing, what we call "libertarianism" in USA today was originally called "classical liberalism" - and AFAIK is still called that in Europe (don't tell any of the modern liberals in America who get allergic reaction from a mention of Mises or Ayn Rand :) If you mean "modern ...


25

What you are asking for is government charity. Libertarians don't believe in government charity but in private charity. So the person would have to raise money privately. Another alternative is to loan the person the money and collect from their future income. Another alternative is to buy medical insurance ahead of time. Then the insurer would be ...


25

If someone was concerned about this impact (and no generous billionaires step up to fix it out of the goodness of their hearts) they'd first need to be able to quantify and qualify said impact in a way in which it can be attributable to individual sources. They'd have to fund that research themselves, with few hopes of an ROI for their labor. Once they could ...


24

The linked article defines "rights" in a particular way and then goes on to argue that "healthcare" cannot be a right under that definition. This is akin to the "No True Scotsman" fallacy. Hamish sees an Englishman wearing highland dress incorrectly. "No Scotsman would ever put a sporran on upside-down" he claims. His wife responds "But don't you recall ...


23

Because most (all?) US states vote for individual representatives on a district-by-district basis. In order to get a person into a state senate or state assembly, that person needs to run in one voting district and gain the majority of votes there. That means an overall 14% approval across the whole nation won't get you any seats when it is evenly ...


22

I think it has less to do with Republican/ Democrat and more with conservative/ liberal, and even these definitions are in a high state of flux. A Libertarian wants personal freedom, and believes the defining characteristic of government should be in allowing, supporting, and encouraging personal freedoms and the exercise thereof. Recently, the liberal ...


22

There are countries which legalize prostitution, citing an argument just like yours. The line between serving a drink in a sexy outfit and serving a drink and a lap dance is thin. However: Some people believe that not all contracts with free and informed consent are acceptable. A gross example would be a guy selling his own heart for a lot of money -- that'...


21

There are a number of possible reasons, and the answer is probably a combination of all of them. Politics is tribal. Many voters have "Republican" or "Democrat" as part of their personal identity, which they often inherited from their parents. "Libertarian", less so. This can change, but it tends to be generational. As @phoog pointed out in the comments, ...


17

The Libertarian movement has had rather limited success in getting officials elected to governments around the world. This may not be all that surprising, given that the movement generally favors the significant limiting of government. One country where they have seen significant successes, however, is in Costa Rica under the Partido Movimiento Libertario ...


17

Suicide (or more generally, self-harm) has been a difficult moral subject for libertarian philosophy. In earlier times, self-harm was held to be a moral evil. So the possibility of a moral philosophy which accepted self-harm was a serious situation. Generally: Self-Harm is Permitted In general, the libertarian philosophers make self-harm morally ...


15

While I don't have the "standard" answer that fits all libertarians, I must note that "full disclosure or full privacy" are not the ONLY two choices. First off, let's examine WHY one would want full transparency or full privacy: Transparency benefit is obvious. Proponents of campaign finance (unrestricted) argue that the donations in and out of ...


15

All the examples of monopolies that I have found are created by the government, or at least aided by it in large ways. Are there any counterexamples? If not, why not? As you note, one possibility is that monopolies are not natural and can only create the necessary barriers with government help. The other possibility is simply that before the company ...


13

As a libertarian, I would argue that no one has the right to coerce either the donor or the politician to disclose their donations. They are not coercing anyone, so, by the NAP, they are fully within their right to go about their business unbothered. To a principled libertarian, the above is all that matters. A libertarian focuses on rights, which are ...


13

Hayek never explained his support for UBS outright. However, it's unquestionable that he firmly supported UBS. The closest we come to an explanation is a quote from "The Public Sector and the Private Sector" in "Law, Legislation and Liberty, Volume 3: The Political Order of a Free People": The assurance of a certain minimum income for everyone, or a sort ...


12

Both Anarchism and Libertarianism oppose compulsion and formal hierarchies in human society. Anarchism says that the state is always bad, in every time, place and situation. It will always be used to control and harm others and so should never be permitted. “[n]o one should be entrusted with power, inasmuch as anyone invested with authority must ... ...


12

Many libertarians think insider trading should be allowed. One argument goes like this, information will allow people to make money, but if insider trading is prohibited, then the people making the money are just information hawks instead of insiders. Average people still aren't being protected by insider trading laws. For example Warren C. Gibson argues on ...


11

I know you said no answers of the form "that can't exist", but surely a direct quote from Mises himself is an exception. It's way too long to post here, but since it's in a published book that will likely exist forever, I think a "link only" answer with a page number should be okay. See page 630 of Human Action here (actually page 654 by the PDF's numbering)...


11

Here's the short answer: contracts. For the long answer: one of the keystones of libertarianism is the non-initiation of force. The other keystone that's relevant here is voluntary association through contracts. There are circumstances under which individuals should be considered incapable of participation in contracts. Here are a couple of scenarios: ...


11

As a "lowercase l" libertarian, I have long maintained that individuals have the right to declare themselves 'married' to anyone they see fit, but that does not imply a right to compel anyone else to do anything in response. If two people's relationship is widely recognized by the population as a whole but some particular person doesn't want to acknowledge ...


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