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70

The market was somewhat more free before the rent freeze (it was not completely free, see antipattern's excellent answer), and this had effects that some Berliners considered undesirable. The article describes what some of those effects were: ...in recent years, rents have skyrocketed...pushing middle-class families from Berlin's central residential ...


66

Let's start with the understanding that in the USA — at least for the moment — political power is distributed, not centralized. This is a feature of our system of governance, not a bug. The Founders wanted political power distributed over many people, on many different levels, in many different forms, so that it would be difficult for any tyrant to amass ...


63

While not exactly discussing the video and the the allegation of "suitcases of ballots", the topic of "secret counting" at the State Farm Arena was actually discussed by election officials with the media before this hearing: State Election Board member fact-checks fraud claims, including 'secret counting' in Fulton [...] Taking a roughly ...


55

What is the largest political entity that lacks legislative power? The United Nations. It comprises of 193 states with two additional observer states - Vatican City and Palestine. Whilst it has a General Assembly, which can be considered as a kind of legislative body, its resolutions aren't binding and hence are considered advisory on its member states.


50

Rent for new buildings isn't capped (at least not by this new law), so the cap shouldn't interfere with new buildings. Rent may also be increased up to a point when a building is modernized. The cap was implemented because the market didn't work for a lot of people who needed to spend more and more of their income on rent or be driven out of Berlin. The ...


49

What's going on? This is a leftover from earlier historical tradition, which had lots of lower-level democracy. For example, coroners being elected was a tradition not just from early days of USA, but actually from English common law: Electing a coroner is a holdover from medieval English common law, where the coroner's job was to determine how and when ...


48

So the borough of Manhattan (pop. 1.6m) does not have its own separate authority with legislative powers. Are there even bigger fully dependent political entities like this? There are at least two political entities that are more populous than Manhattan and certainly meet your criteria, because they are also boroughs of the city of New York: Brooklyn and ...


47

The pattern you describe is called colonization. Think of it. A place that is viewed as being "without proper government." Europeans come in, bring their laws and administration, in the hope that the locals will be happier than with their previous rulers. What makes you think that Sweden would want to do it? They seem to be a fan of democracy, all things ...


45

Because when these results are projected into a nationwide swing, Labour and Conservatives come out suggesting that Labour has a small lead. However there is normally a swing away from the party of Government in mid-term elections, and a swing back towards the government party for the general. Projecting these result forward to the next general election ...


45

Systemic racism is a problem wider than any city or department and not the result of personal prejudice or "bad apples". It's far beyond the scope of an answer to explain or debate the applicability and utility of the theory, but there are some familiar touchstones that explain parts contributing to racial inequity via policing in minority-majority ...


35

The unopportunistic and unattractive truth (I'm not afraid of saying it) is that Berlin is a red-red-green governed city and rents are one of their most important lighthouse projects. Also, the market does not, and cannot work because the market is actively prevented from working. The market is driven by offer and demand. Demand has been going up, so ...


33

Ukraine "imported" some high ranking civil servants (ministers) and advisers, in an attempt to fight corruption and bring some efficiency into the administration. Perhaps the best known is Mikheil Saakashvili, former Georgian president, appointed a Governor of Odessa Oblast in 2015. The outcome? Mixed. Saakashvili was quite popular and apparently ...


28

Yes. I believe all 16 German states maintain ‘representations’ in Brussels to the EU. Brussels obviously not being part of Germany and the EU not being a nation state and thus (critically) not handling immigration issues. The aim of these representations is to provide the input of the various German states to the European Union. Fun fact: the Bavarian ...


25

According to this website, today is the Hamilton Co. Municipal Primary Election, the General Election is scheduled for November 5th, 2019. On the surface, Indiana is an open primary state, so you do not have to register for a party in order to participate in that party's primary. However, there is a law IC 3-10-1-6 that reads like this: A voter may vote ...


25

The UN sometimes manages entire countries. Here is a link to the administration for Kosovo And a list of territories governed by the UN


20

Federalism Before we talk about anything else, let's note that the United States is a federal system. Each state sets its own rules. Even the titles might be different. So the following discussion will be centered on how things are done in Pennsylvania, which may be quite different from how they might be done in other states. Another state might even ...


19

Because the Berlin government fails to understand (or at least publicly acknowledge) that price freezes don't work. This has been proven time and time again, but it is easy for politicians to ignore the physical reality of how the world operates, as long as it brings them more votes during the next election. Case in point: No, rent control does not work — ...


17

Local government elections don't have any direct impact on each other and there is no consensus way to quantify the fact that an election in a small city, or a city with more seats on its council, may be less important than in a major city, or a seat with fewer seats on its council. Similarly, is the only thing that matters how many local governments are ...


16

First off, to clarify: the executive of a town/city in USA is typically called a "mayor", not a "governor". The powers of a mayor may vary from state to state and city to city, BUT: Yes, mayors usually control local law enforcement (police). This is not a new concept - local law enforcement was a feature of British system - although at a regional, rather ...


15

The directive which this question relates to was issued on March 25th by the New York State Department of Health. It is now no longer available on their website, but has been archived here. It states: No resident shall be denied re-admission or admission to the NH [(Nursing Home)] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19. NHs are ...


15

This effect has been fairly well researched, for example by Schaffner, Streb, & Wright in their 2001 paper Teams Without Uniforms: The Nonpartisan Ballot in State and Local Elections in Political Research Quarterly. They examine a number of US elections, including those in the city of Asheville, North Carolina as it switched from partisan to nonpartisan ...


13

A number of US states maintain representation abroad for trade and investment promotion purposes. This list is a couple of years out of date, but gives you an idea of the variety of such offices. Note that not everyone listed there may be an employee of the state sent abroad; Pennsylvania's "Authorized Trade Representatives" are apparently local ...


11

It depends... Even within a single state, there may be different governing structures for different cities. When a city gets large enough, it gets a "charter" that describes the nature of the government. Different cities' charters can be very different. Most cities have either a "strong mayor" or a "weak mayor" government. In a "weak mayor" government, ...


10

As Jan already answered for Germany, most member states of European countries maintain some kind of representation to the EU in Brussels. For example, Lower Austria is represented through Lower Austrian Liaison Office to the EU in Brussels (NÖVBB). Some states share a common, multi-national regional representation, as is the case for Tirol, where the ...


9

Frame challenge: they don't have anything to explain, because that's not what systemic racism is. There's an implicit premise in the question that progressives think that white police officers have ill intentions towards African Americans or other minorities, and of course those minorities wouldn't be prejudiced against their own kind. But... Systemic racism ...


8

The (long suppressed) video evidence is particularly incriminating. It showed police officers who aggressively engaged their suspect, made no attempt to protect themselves, and one who fired a full 16-round magazine into McDonald without any immediate danger to himself or others. There is substantial evidence of a concerted effort to cover up the incident. ...


8

To address why Wandsworth is described as a key target, it's necessary to summarise the electoral system for UK national elections, as well as local elections in England and Wales. Both use a first past the post (i.e. the candidate(s) with a plurality of votes wins) in individual voting areas (parliamentary constituencies at national level, wards an local ...


8

Municipalities in British Columbia are regulated through the Local Government Act of British Columbia and the Community Charter (and Vancouver has its own thing that applies only to it, but let's avoid that.) The Fundamental Powers section of the Community Charter might be a good place to start, as this brief fragment might demonstrate: 8.3 A council may,...


8

Why do states do it like this, instead of having them appointed by governor? The intent is to weaken the power of the governor, compared to the power of the President of the United States. Several states have their lieutenant governors elected separately by the people rather than as a joint governor / lieutenant governor ticket. Several states have key ...


8

Over the years, Québec (a province in Canada) has maintained Délégations in several cities; in the US, in Paris and in other French-speaking capitals. This article (https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/delegations-du-quebec) says that they are mostly now closed. And, as @Nimloth points out, the Québec government's website on the subject lists ...


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