17

As is often the case, the answer is Yes and No. Specifically yes in some ways, and no in others. The chief place where parliamentary systems win out over the separately elected executive branch (at least in terms of preventing a government shutdown) is that the government (i.e. executive) is chosen by the legislative body. This means there cannot be a long-...


16

In a parliamentary system, the government is, by definition, the party (or coalition) of parties which controls the lower house (in the UK, the House of Commons). In particular, achieving parliamentary approval for supply -- i.e. the ability to spend money -- is a make or break issue for a government, akin to vote of confidence. If a government loses supply,...


12

No the US has no mechanism for resolving this. That's a consequence of two things that are distinct about the US system (compared with the Westminster and similar systems) The system where all budgets must be approved by both chambers of the legislature and the President, with no built in mechanism for resolving disputes. Coupled with an alternating ...


7

Nope. We have the safety valve of a Double Dissolution. :-) Basically a mechanism exists to boot them all to an early election if they can't perform the basic function of a government.


3

At least in Russia if the budget is not agreed on by the legislature, the government is required to make payments following the budget of the previous year, until a new budget is approved. Russia is not parliamentary system.


1

In general, the government administrative functions carry along under "Special Warrants." The Queen, or her representative (Governor General) authorizes more money. See this http://www.cbc.ca/newsblogs/politics/inside-politics-blog/2013/10/government-shutdown-could-it-happen-in-canada.html When something a bit more severe happened in Australia, the GG ...


1

As DJClayworth correctly points out, there is no mechanism for forcing a resolution. But there are mechanisms for making a shutdown extremely unpleasant for Congress, ideally to the point that they pass a budget notwithstanding their political differences. For starters, Article I Section 5 of the US Constitution provides that: Each House shall be the judge ...


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