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287

The answers so far are not answering the question. People are saying why they believe communism is morally wrong, not why Americans believe it is evil. The American Cultural Context The simple answer is that America has always been deeply suspicious of foreign ideas, especially those which conflict with values considered quintessentially American (WASP)....


215

Fundamental to communist ideology is the common ownership of the means of production and abolishment of social classes and social hierarchy. In practice, that means no (or very few) private property rights, and forced redistribution of wealth from those who are most able to produce to those who are less able or unwilling to do so. Private property and the ...


178

TL;DR: because communism did, in fact, kill people. Between 23 million (low estimate) and 100 million (high estimate) of them killed by regimes that collectively self-branded themselves as led by "communist" parties. The question contains two premises, both 100% false: That the only reason Communism is seen as evil is "because propaganda" and "because the ...


71

Why is communism considered as evil (like fascism and nazism) in western countries? Simple answer is them vs us. This was previously nationality, but cold-war era saw this them vs us line drawn more on economic lines as alliances spanned multiple nations. Them vs us is a 100% with or 100% against perception (no middle ground between two polar opposites) ...


62

Communism has committed atrocities far greater than the Holocaust. Holodomor: up to 12 million dead Khmer Rouge: up to 3 million dead The Great Leap Forward: up to 55 million dead Tanzania Experiment: no deaths, only near famine Death, famine, and genocide are usually considered evil.


51

Why is communism considered as evil (like fascism and nazism) in the United States? Short Answer The background necessary to accurately answer your question is complex in both history and culture, but perhaps one short introduction could be: Due to a series of actions done and promoted by various agents in the USA starting roughly after 1917, following ...


42

A searchable PDF suggests it's been freely translated: Apologies for using an image, but the side-by-side didn't paste sensibly. You can see that the currency is different but has been converted; the English uses dollars, the German original uses "sh", presumably for "schilling". Elsewhere in the text he uses pounds Sterling (abbreviated as "Pfd.St."). ...


37

It depends on your definition of communism - AND religion. Marx, as another answerer noted, officially denounced religion. This was for three distinct reasons: Organized religion (church) for hundreds of years was either a political power, or co-opted by another power (monarchs) to help pacify the oppressed lower classes. The official version of what was ...


32

There have been many pronouncements of this type; they became particularly popular during and after WWI; although during the war the position of the socialist parties was that not so much about the profit but the fact that the proletarians of Europe were fighting each other along national lines instead of fighting their class enemies. From your wording, ...


30

We can see that classical communism didn't perceive the aristocracy to be a threat or enemy, at least not as much as the bourgeoisie. The communist manifesto describes the aristocracy in 1848 as "ruined" by the bourgeoisie already: The feudal aristocracy was not the only class that was ruined by the bourgeoisie, not the only class whose conditions ...


29

What is the reason for this idea that communism is evil or like Nazism and fascism and aims to kill people? Because the leaders of Communist nations (chiefly Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot) happily slaughtered millions of their own people in the name of revolution, or instituted policies that led to famine and mass death. Per Wikipedia, fully a quarter of ...


15

I'm going to posit that nobody really knows the correct answer--and in fact there probably isn't any one answer that's entirely correct. Consider just a few of the possibilities: Americans have been exposed to a huge amount of anti-communist propaganda, varying all the way from extremely blatant to quite subtle. There's also quite a bit of objective ...


14

Your list includes ideologies and broad descriptive terms. For a history of Marxism as a history of ideas I strongly recommend Leszek Kołakowski's Main Currents of Marxism in three volumes. I strongly disagree with Leszek on a wide number of points, but his survey was adequate as of 1967. Restricting this answer to varieties of Marxism: Since Karl and ...


14

Marx and Engels believed that after a communist revolution, all land would no longer be owned by individual people but would be considered common property. That would mean that private people who make a living from renting the land they own to others would no longer exist. The government might still charge rent to those people who make over-proportional ...


13

The closest thing I found is a song by rebelling/deserting German soldier in the closing days of WWI. It’s all a Swindle: The War is for the Wealthy, The Middle Class must give way. The People provide the corpses. This was published in a paper by Nick Howard on the German uprisings of 1918 (collected in a 1999 CUP volume, p. 14). The same song was ...


12

In short, it turned out to be not nearly as bad as Marx though it would be during the 20th century, and how much it will impact the 21st century is in debate nowadays. Note that Marx has never been the only one to think this. It is called technological unemployment, and it was also what lead Keynes to think we would work 15 hours a week by now. It could ...


12

The Quote Castro is referring to the "dictatorship of the proletariat". He means to say that in the revolution the workers will act as a dictatorship, controlling their former masters. There are two important elements here: This is a dictatorship, not a democracy. The workers are not going to give up any power to the owning-class through elections, public ...


12

From the Wikipedia page on the Frankfurt School: "Cultural Marxism" in modern usage refers to a conspiracy theory which sees the Frankfurt School as part of an ongoing movement to take over and destroy Western culture. The term "cultural Marxism" has an academic usage within cultural studies, where it refers to a form of anti-capitalist ...


12

I don't know what Peterson means by this, but according to Wikipedia's definition of postmodernism: While encompassing a wide variety of approaches and disciplines, postmodernism is generally defined by an attitude of skepticism, irony, or rejection of the grand narratives and ideologies of modernism, often calling into question various assumptions of ...


11

Take a look at this, gives a fair summary... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRbxmQv8Iyk Socialism = The State owns the means of production (rather than private companies), and distributes the result Communism = No State/Government nor any private companies. The People themselves decides communally what they need and how to best use resources. Has never ...


11

What is the lumpenproletariat? First off, the lumpenproletariat are proletariat. They are part of the working class ("owning nothing but their labor"). In general Marx broke society into two high-level classes: bourgeoisie and proletariat. They are defined by their relationship to the means of production (bourgeoisie own the means of production, while the ...


11

What you describe, is referred to by the term "imperialism", i.e. a policy that involves a nation extending its power by the acquisition of lands by purchase, diplomacy or military force. While you can find some references on imperialism in Marx, they are mainly focus on what he describes as primitive accumulation, where the origins of capital are explained,...


11

This related question on skeptics.SE might answer the question: Did Fidel Castro put gay people into concentration camps?. Cuba operated forced labor camps for those that did not want to, or were not allowed to serve their military service. This included gay people. Conditions in these camps were described as bad (10-12 hours of work, spoiled food, etc). ...


10

Prior to developing fascism, Mussolini was a socialist in the Marxist sense. During WW1, Mussolini recognised that it wasn't class that drew people together most strongly, it was cultural, historical and linguistic identity. This cultural identity drew people together from across class backgrounds; from aristocracy to capitalists to workers. As such, he ...


10

I think it is unusual to not have totalitarian communism (not to be equated with moderate forms of socialism) viewed as an evil. It's particularly in Europe, where many leading intellectuals harbor sympathy to far-left, even violent and oppressive, political views, or assume that even mass murderous systems, like those of Stalin and Mao, came from "good" ...


9

You seem to be very focused on Russia in your question, but both Marx and Engels were born in what is now the Westernmost part of Germany and lived most of their lives in countries nearby (Belgium, England, ...). Belgium for example had gained its independence in 1831, mostly driven by liberals and catholics who wanted to take power away from the ...


9

Both Marx and Engels considered class struggle as a tool to overthrow the capitalists. This struggle can be achieved in various ways from minor (strikes) to major (civil wars). Marx analysed how new classes have become ruling classes throughout history, by violently overthrowing older classes (ex. in French revolution, where Capitalists overthrew the old ...


9

First, allow me to point out a subtle category error. Trotskyism falls under the rubric of Marxist-Leninist theory. It's a kind of Marxist-Leninist theory, so asking for the differences between 'Trotskyism' and 'Marxist-Leninism' is like asking for the differences between 'apples' and 'fruit'. Apples may be different from other kinds of fruit, but it doesn't ...


8

The Stanford Journal of East Asian Affairs published an article in 2003 which provides an overview of juche. The article is available online for free as a PDF (see the linked document). For a description of juche, that is a great place to start. As Philosophy If you are looking at this as an exercise in political philosophy, Lee succinctly says (pg.109): .....


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