New answers tagged

6

Notably Lindsay Graham said (which I posted as a now deleted comment) "I want you to use my words against me. If there's a Republican president in 2016 and a vacancy occurs in the last year of the first term, you can say Lindsey Graham said, 'Let's let the next president, whoever it might be, make that nomination,' " he said in 2016 shortly after ...


4

To answer the question about trust in the written press, I think we need to zoom out. Let's first have a look at trust in institutions more broadly. That's a fair step because your figure compares different news media in different countries. So not only are the news organizations different, so are their audiences. Comparing trust in institutions ...


6

There are three main differences between the 2016 event and the 2020 event. In 2016, there was not a famous, recent precedent. In 2020, there is a month until the election. In 2016, there was nearly 9 months between nomination and election. In 2016, the party that did not control the presidency argued on principle that the Senate should wait. In 2020, the ...


5

Neither side is being hypocritical, because anyone assuming that the senate works from principles as opposed to party tribalism is naive. Both parties have been completely consistent, in that: they're going to vote with whatever helps their party out. The supposed reasons that are given are just post-hoc justifications (which pretty much just makes them ...


-1

It's important to note that Republicans did not "set a precedent" in 2016; they simply followed the existing precedent. Statistically speaking, you'd expect approximately 1 in 4 Supreme Court Justice deaths to occur during an election year, so it would be very strange indeed if 2016 were the first time this had ever happened! In fact, it's ...


3

Mainstream media bias, plain and simple. I know it’s a cliched term at this point, but when I say “mainstream media”, I’m referring to the big 3 cable news networks (CNN, MSNBC, and Fox), the big 3 broadcast networks (CBS, ABC, and NBC), and the two largest newspapers in the country (The New York Times and the Washington Post). These outlets dominate most ...


2

Republicans and Democrats will make decisions when politically expedient and come up with reasonings like "precedent" and "will of the people" to justify it. In 2016 it was Democrats saying "do your job and give Garland a vote", with Republicans opposing with "let the next president decide", and now in 2020 it is ...


19

Precedent Republicans proposed a new rule and introduced it successfully. Now they want to get rid of the rule. Democrats opposed the rule, yet the rule was established over their objections. Democrats don't even have to mention where they stand on confirming Supreme Court nominees in an election year. Instead they argue that Republicans should be bound by ...


0

Your question and many of these answers seem to be overestimating the importance of principles here. Republicans didn't oppose Garland's opposition because they believe in the principle that late presidents shouldn't appoint supreme court justices. They didn't do it to honor Scalia. Those explanations were made up to justify their actions.They did it ...


12

If the Senate were able to perform their constitutionally mandated duty to "advise and consent" on Merrick Garland, that is, if there was a hearing and Republicans voted Garland down fair and square 49-51, that would have been as remarkable now as Robert Bork, Douglas Ginsberg, or Harriet Miers as a Supreme Court nominee who didn't make it through ...


-4

The Republicans wanted to oppose Obama's Supreme Court nomination, since Obama was a Democrat, but now, Republicans are changing their mind since the incumbent president is a Republican, Donald Trump. They only used "nominating someone to the Supreme Court in an election year is bad practice" as an excuse to not support the Democratic Supreme Court ...


39

Others have answered about the hypocrisy angle, but I also see another difference this time. In 2016, the Democrats knew that they would face opposition from the Republican Senate. So Obama deliberately chose a moderate candidate, Merrick Garland. He was clearly trying to offer the GOP a compromise by not nominating a far-left justice. But the Republicans ...


32

Suppose you and your friend had been playing a game many times for years. One day your friend decided to change the rules in the middle of a session in a way that was very advantageous to them. The next time the two of you played, the rule change would benefit you. So you suggested that you do the rule change again. But your friend was absolutely against it. ...


8

The other answers provide some reasons, but here is another one: because the Republicans have been demonstrating their partisanship for four years, and people do not judge political decisions in a vacuum. The Democrats do not control the presidency and the Senate, and they are less partisan overall (asymmetrical polarization). Thus, during Trump's presidency ...


126

Why are the Republicans being criticized? Because in 2016 they didn't simply say it was party politics as the reason to oppose Obama's choice, nor even that they disagreed with his choice. They chose to portray this as a matter of principle. On principle, they declared that they believed a new Justice should not be appointed in an election year, because it ...


23

The timing reinforces the case for waiting In 2016 the gap in the Supreme Court opened in February. That meant that waiting for the election left the seat open for an extra half a year. In 2020 the gap in the Supreme Court opened in September. In this case appointing a new justice before the election would require unusual haste, and delaying appointment ...


45

which seems symmetrically inconsistent No, they're not. The Republicans are asking that precedent established by them be disregarded because it benefits them. Democrats are asking that precedent be respected. So it's not symmetric. There is a difference between arguing for A, then arguing for B, versus arguing for (A and B). Suppose your company offers you ...


64

The main reason for this is down to one question: who won the argument in 2016? Because the Republicans had a majority in the Senate in 2016, it was them who decided how Obama's nomination would be handled. The position of the Democrats would not have affected the outcome in any way. Similarly, in 2020, as the Republicans have a majority in the Senate, they ...


180

The Democrats were in favour of appointing Garland in 2016, but now that the Republicans have set a precedent that Supreme Court Justices should not be appointed in an election year, the Republicans are being asked to stick to it. The Democrats are simply asking the Republicans to stick to the principles they used four years ago. The Republicans are the ones ...


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