58 votes

Do Congressional representatives and senators read letters we send them?

Letters About Political Issues The vast majority of letters (about pending issues) written to politicians are read by staff members of the politician (who often code similar responses and reply with a ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 77.9k
49 votes

Are there restrictions in the UK against calling politicians liars?

Yes, Members of Parliament may not normally accuse other MPs of lying while they are speaking in Parliament - paragraph 21.24 of Erskine May states the following: The general requirements of ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
43 votes
Accepted

How might the United Kingdom become a republic?

Another revolution, obviously. They did that in 1649. Much more likely, they would politely inform the Queen that the people don't seem to want a Queen any more. If that is really the case, and not ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 108k
21 votes
Accepted

What does "Boris Johnson has a hundred and sixty MPs on his payroll anyway who were going to vote for him because they're within the government" mean?

The "payroll" refers to MPs who hold roles in the government, i.e. government ministers, parliamentary private secretaries (PPS), whips or in some way dependent on the PM's patronage. These ...
Panda's user avatar
  • 46.6k
20 votes

Are there restrictions in the UK against calling politicians liars?

There are no or very few restrictions for the general public or newspapers. Just by typing in 'Boris Johnson liar' on Google News I found articles from various UK newspapers as diverse as the Guardian,...
Jan's user avatar
  • 13.1k
15 votes
Accepted

What are the limits of parliamentary privilege?

As summary, some limits from case law: Parliamentary expense declarations were not considered included in the privilege. The privilege also doesn't cover parliamentary publications per se although a ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
15 votes

What does the Conservative Party expelling an MP mean?

MP's who have had the whip removed (the technical term for the expulsion of an MP from the parliamentary party) retain their seats and their ability to vote. They then sit as independents or, less ...
CoedRhyfelwr's user avatar
  • 5,836
15 votes

Do Congressional representatives and senators read letters we send them?

I can state from personal experience that staffers do in fact read incoming mail. Certainly regarding one-off circumstances. I can fully believe that hot-button issue messages are simply tallied ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
14 votes

Why are UK MPs allowed to abstain (but it counts as a no)?

This is an exception to normal parliamentary procedure. As @Moo correctly answers, the Fixed Term Parliament Act requires a specific threshold to pass. Closure Motions also have a threshold of 100 (...
Phil's user avatar
  • 340
14 votes

How might the United Kingdom become a republic?

The Oath doesn't preclude republicanism. (Subject to interpretation, of course.) Note that the oath (or solemn declaration) only commits the MP to "true allegiance" to the reigning monarch of the ...
The Dark Lord's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Can an MP be impeached?

As with all constitutional questions in the UK, the qualifier "Parliament can change the below at will" must be borne in mind. is there any process to expel an MP from their post except for ...
Dan Scally's user avatar
  • 5,795
13 votes

Why does the number of votes not correspond to the number of elected MPs?

First past the post is not meant to be proportional. You didn’t say which particular election you were talking about, but taking the 2017 election as an example, the SNP fielded candidates in all 59 ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
11 votes

How might the United Kingdom become a republic?

There are lots of republican MPs (probably including the Leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition). Some of them have taken the Loyal Oath with their fingers crossed behind their backs. At the ...
Martin Bonner supports Monica's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Have Jonathan Pie's "allegations" been supported by the Privileges Committee report? "he lied, and did it again by denying that he’d previously lied"

The report of the privileges committee did not directly find Johnson's statements referred to in the video in the question misleading. The statements denying any misleading of the house referred to in ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
10 votes
Accepted

Minimum number of MPs

There is a minimum number of MPs as a threshold for divisions (votes) in the House of Commons. That is set by Standing Order. The current quorum is 40. It doesn't matter what parties they are from. ...
Lag's user avatar
  • 5,696
10 votes

How might the United Kingdom become a republic?

In recent years the constitutional settlement seems to be that significant changes to the constitution require a referendum. Now even supposing that all MPs took the oath of allegiance entirely ...
James K's user avatar
  • 118k
9 votes

How might the United Kingdom become a republic?

It is not at all clear to me that the oath is intended to be taken literally or that it precludes republican principles. For example, in order to be nationalized as a Canadian citizen one must swear ...
Noah Snyder's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Do MPs participating in the House of Commons virtually benefit from Parliamentary Privilege?

On viewing the recording of the first session of the hybrid proceedings today, I see that the Speaker addressed this issue at the outset: Mr. Speaker Yesterday, the House agreed to a motion to ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
8 votes

Is it legal to talk about former Chief Justice of India (CJI) in the Parliament of India?

In the Westminster system (the Parliament of India one of those which is in many ways modelled on the Parliament in Britain) members have certain privileges. One of which is that the courts cannot ...
James K's user avatar
  • 118k
7 votes
Accepted

Are there restrictions in the UK against calling politicians liars?

Since the fictional character Jonathan Pie is not an MP and does not speak in Parliament, I highly doubt he was referring to rules governing what language is acceptable in Parliament, as the other ...
kaya3's user avatar
  • 601
6 votes

What are the limits of parliamentary privilege?

Parliamentary privilege is granted by the Bill of Rights, 1688, enacted shortly after the reformation of the monarchy. The relevant passage cites (with original spelling): That the Freedome of ...
Joe C's user avatar
  • 27.9k
6 votes

Minimum number of MPs

As Lag's answer mentions, the quorum for a division is 40*. However, many decisions in the Commons are done by a voice vote, for which there is no quorum. For example, adjournment debates are ...
Steve Melnikoff's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is a member of the Loyal opposition a Minister of the Crown?

No, the members of Her Majesty's loyal opposition are shadow ministers. They don't have a job in government, though they may be members of the Privy council.
James K's user avatar
  • 118k
5 votes
Accepted

Are letters from MPs to other MPs on the internet?

No; your assumption that such letters are public is mistaken. There's no statutory requirement to publish correspondence between MPs. Although the House of Commons is a public body under the Freedom ...
Dan Scally's user avatar
  • 5,795
5 votes
Accepted

How much interaction does a Prime Minister have with their constituency?

The Prime Minister, and other government ministers, naturally have the time they can dedicate to constituency matters limited by the duties of their roles in government. However, as an important part ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
5 votes

What powers do British constituency presiding officers have during elections?

The UK electoral commission have produced a series documents describing the roles of the Returning Officer and their role in the vote count and after the declaration. As noted on page 11 of the first ...
origimbo's user avatar
  • 21.1k
4 votes

Do any MPs have maths degrees?

To update for the new crop of MPs resulting from the 2019 General Election, the Campaign for Science and Engineering has drawn up a list of 103 'MPs to Watch' - MPs with an interest or background in ...
CDJB's user avatar
  • 106k
4 votes

What are the differences between independent and party-affiliated MPs and candidates?

In a strict legal sense, the biggest differences I'm aware of is that the candidate of a registered party are allowed to choose to use the name, description and emblem of their party on their ballot ...
origimbo's user avatar
  • 21.1k
4 votes

Why does the number of votes not correspond to the number of elected MPs?

The first past the post voting system favours large nationwide parties (in the UK the large nationwide parties in terms of members, funding and presence in the field are the Conservatives and Labour, ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 13.1k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible