New answers tagged

13

There are a number of possible reasons (we wouldn't know unless the PLAAF tells us and they probably want to keep their actual motivations secret from the Russians anyway) First, the original contract was not "to reverse engineer". China may have wanted to do that, but the Russians were not keen, having been burned on the SU-27. That's part of ...


21

China used to depend on Russia in aircraft engines for jet fighters. Chinese engineers were unable to properly copy engines like AL-31 for a long time. Domestic engines like WS-10 were unreliable and had short service life. This put China in uncomfortable position because they have a significant air fleet that depend on AL-31 and can't move to WS-10 without ...


30

There are a few possible reasons: Time - China wants the aircraft sooner than it can provide them domestically via reverse engineering. Equivalency - China can reverse engineer their existing aircraft, but that doesn't mean that what they can build is 1:1 equivalent in terms of performance, weight etc. Often, their reverse engineered variants of Russian ...


0

In a libertarian state - if you aren't some kind of full-blown anarchist ideology - the funding might come from various sources for some type of volunteer militia. Despite what many believe, there is a kind of state known as a nightwatchman state that is accepted by some left wing and right wing libertarians. It was described by historian Charles Townshend ...


0

I think the surprise is because the Taliban took control after about 2 weeks and the United States hasn't even fully withdrawn from the region yet. No one expected to take control of the region so quickly or for such a quick power grab to occur without some resistance or hesitancy since the evacuation of US troops was not complete yet. Even with the quick ...


0

To the answer of user4012 I would add an important point that is: Stricter control over the sea area shared by Australia, Timor East and Indonesia which contains important oil and gas fields. https://www.poweroilandgas.com/2011/11/timor-leste-oil-and-gas-industry.html https://www.laohamutuk.org/OilWeb/OTD_FS/Laminria.htm


2

The question (with all the edits) is confounding some issues... Milley for example said more recently that he didn't think the Afghan army would have collapsed so fast: Army Gen. Mark Milley, the military's top officer, expressed disbelief in the implosion of the Afghan army in a press conference on Wednesday afternoon [August 18]. "They had the ...


-2

Note: this first part of the answer was written when the question only had the Chris Stewart quote; for more on the generals-disagreeing (WJS) issue, see below the line. In other news: "Washington can't stop playing the blame game over the US's disastrous Afghanistan withdrawal". My summary: some say it's Biden's sole fault; some say it's the ...


-2

Legally, any of your property is either in your possession, or it is in someone else's possession to look after it, or it is lost, or it is abandoned. Any US army equipment left in Afghanistan is not in US possession. I very much doubt that it was left in Afghanistan possession to look after it and eventually return it to the USA. It's not lost. It's ...


6

So of the equipment we are seeing the Taliban use, do we know how what/how was left directly by USA forces, and how much was abandoned/surrendered by the ANA? No, we don't. According to reporting by the Independent, there's no total account of all the military equipment left behind, regardless of whether it was abandoned by the US or given to the ANA who ...


2

It's often the case that equipment is not cost effective to be retrieved. For example equipment that would need to be dissembled and then reassembled after air transport will often need to be refurbished and re-certified before it can be used again. The facilities required to do this are limited, and equipment would need to be stored and may be in storage ...


-1

Actually, per CNN yesterday, August 26th, 2021, it was announced that the US is quite interested in acquiring intelligent assets on the ground in Afghanistan. Appears, for good reason, to be a lack of willing/qualified candidates. Apparently, even rumors of one collaborating with the US may get your family members killed. This becomes a certainty if you are ...


7

The question is honestly somewhat ill-posed because the US passed over a fair amount of equipment to the Afghan Republic forces as they dismantled US bases this year. Some other equipment was shipped back to the US and some was even destroyed on site. The Western official familiar with the packing up process said U.S. forces face a dilemma: Hand off largely ...


1

It may be possible to lookup via DOD spending justification documents, but you have to know what to look for. Searching for the phrase "Afghan Security Forces Fund (ASFF)" and domain:.mil may help. For example, here's a February 2020 report that can give you an order-of-magnitude idea of recent equipment expenditures for Afghanistan Security ...


6

The US wished to give and be seen to be giving the Afghans every chance of standing up to the Taliban. Removing the equipment that has been provided to the Afghans defence force because the US think the Afghans defence force has no willingness to fight would have resulted in an instant win for the Taliban. Hopefully there is already a plan being put into ...


49

Some of the equipment was a bit more sophisticated than the "small arms" mentioned in the William Walker III's answer. I think that's also what the article in the question is referring to. Much of that equipment wasn't left by accident, it was given by the Americans to the Afghan forces, for them to work with. For example, one article in the ...


45

Because they were ordered to. Having been deployed I can tell you it takes time to pack everything up and ship it out, especially when there is no sea port to move massive amounts of equipment. It's not just throwing it into a container, you have to pack and secure it properly to prevent damage, you have to abide by environmental laws and regulations, ...


21

One would think that if the US military were to leave Afghanistan, they would surely take any equipment that might fall into the wrong hands... One would be naive to think this. Nearly every time the United States has withdraw from a military deployment, large amounts of weapons and other materiel are left behind - some captured, much of it US issue. This ...


2

All airlines that participate in the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) program do so through contracts with the Department of Defense (DoD). These contracts define what the airlines will provide if the DoD activates the program, and the compensation the DoD will provide the airline both during the activation and during times of peace. There have been many such ...


1

The Department of Defense pays the owner of the aircraft to provide a service. The owner of the aircraft pays its employees to operate the aircraft. The selection of specific crew members for the flights is probably through the same mechanism used for regular duty assignments, but regardless of how it's done, the DoD doesn't trouble itself with the details....


2

Per this wiki article, though may not be up-to-date, the pay-scale for the Afghanistan soldier looks like this: Under the US–Afghanistan Strategic Partnership Agreement (July 4, 2012), the United States designated Afghanistan as a major non-NATO ally and agreed to fund the ANA until at least 2024. This included soldiers' salaries, providing training and ...


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