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In addition to the other answers given here, there is considerable concern in military circles that carriers are simply big targets. The point of a carrier group is to project air power. It can only do this within the operational radius of the aircraft it carries. Traditional doctrine therefore is that the carrier group stays out of range of shore batteries, ...


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Part 2 of the question has been dealt with in the previous answers, I'll respond to part 1 by providing a précis of this excellent article Tactical Range and Replenishment The VSTOL aircraft launched by ski-ramp mitigate the need for the higher into-wind speed of a nuclear carrier Nuclear carriers require escort ships and tankers which are conventionally ...


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While terms will vary by government and specific contract, progress payments are the typical means for financing expensive, long-term government projects. Progress payments are periodic payments made by the government as performance on the contract proceeds. Such payments are based either on cost incurred by the contractor or on a percentage of stage of ...


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It is very difficult and expensive for countries the size of the UK and France to maintain a so-called blue-water navy. They have been on the verge of being downgraded for decades now but are keen on maintaining this capability. The Indian and Chinese navy are not comparable. You shouldn't just look at the number of ships but also their tonnage and technical ...


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To (1): seemingly nuclear power buys you a few extra knots of speed for an aircraft carrier, which only matters for CATOBAR but supposedly not for STOVL carriers. And the UK seemingly can't even afford one CATOBAR carrier; the 2nd Queen Elizabeth class was supposed to be CATOBAR, but this plan was scapped in 2012, due to the costs involved. Apparently (1st ...


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A few other observations. Gender, Geography and Religion Gender (as it intersects with race) The Pew study controls for many other factors, but not for gender. Military veterans are overwhelmingly male (about 92%). There is a strong gender divide between men and women on overall liberal to conservative political inclinations at this time. Consider, for ...


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In short, the conditions that drive someone to join the military are correlated to a propensity to vote right wing. It's established that the poor are more likely to vote for a right wing party. The same can be said for a lack of education. It just so happens that the people entering the military tend to do so because it's one of their only options for ...


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There is a very strong inertia to such decisions. The USS Nimitz is still in service after 45 years and the plans got serious a decade before that. During the Cold War, the British assumption was that they would have to fight the Soviets in Europe, not at one of those little islands your map highlights. No need for an aircraft carrier in the North Sea, or ...


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Person serving in the military is self-selected to work in hierarchical authoritarian system (except for people who have it as a family tradition). It is well documented that conservativism, traditionalism and authoritarianism are correlated I refuse the notion that conservatives are more patriotic. It is about priorities, Left-leaning are more interested in ...


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The modern US military is self-selecting — a professional army, not a conscripted one — so I doubt this effect would hold true historically. But as a rule, the political Right tends to value military service as a symbol of deep patriotism. As a consequence, those who lean politically Right who want to serve the nation will be more likely to think of the ...


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Carabinieri in Italy are a military police force, but they are basically indistinguishable from the police (they have essentially the same tasks). I would bet that many Italians don't even know that they are technically a part of the army. A recent poll (January 2020) measured 'trust' in various Italian police forces. Polizia di Stato (civil police): 69% (-...


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New Zealand Background: Police in New Zealand do not typically carry firearms on their person, despite a longstanding stated desire from the police association to do so. Since 2012 pistols and semi-automatic rifles are stored in lock boxes in patrol cars, which may be accessed at the officer's discretion, but they must advise their command if they are going ...


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Unclear This question should be answered by citing international studies on public trust in police institutions with a focus on militarization. Alas, a cursory search did not reveal any such studies. I have found, however, some information that may hint at an answer. Police militarization The study OP linked in their question defines police militarization as ...


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There is a lot of confusion regarding the French Gendarmerie, fueled by descriptions like “military police” or “military force with law enforcement duty” which are technically correct but do not fully reflect the nature and tactics of the force. Its members are indeed military officers, which has some legal consequences (trade unions are strictly forbidden, ...


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A (currently WIP) study entitled Militarization and Perceptions of Law Enforcement in the Developing World: Evidence from a Conjoint Experiment in Mexico by Flores-Macías, G., & Zarkin, J. looks at this factor in Mexico. This study uses data from an image-based conjoint experiment in a nationally representative survey, in which respondents were presented ...


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China copying Su-27 was (perhaps) first reported in 2008. The RFE RL reported on April 22, 2008 about the copying story that appeared in the Russian newspaper Nezavisimaya gazeta. IS CHINA COPYING RUSSIAN ARMS TECHNOLOGY FOR ITS OWN EXPORTS? The daily "Nezavisimaya gazeta" wrote on April 22 that "China is on its way to becoming a major arms ...


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The simplest answer may be that this is just formalising what was previously done behind closed doors. The head of Israel's foreign intelligence service visited the UAE days after they announced the treaty. The UAE may not seem like much of a valuable ally, especially when there are Arab states with larger armies much closer to Israel. But this ...


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The dollar amount of military spending isn't exactly the same as military strength, but they're certainly hardly uncorrelated. France, Germany, and the UK all have spending around $50 B, while Turkey's is only $13 B. So by that standard, the EU is way ahead of Turkey. And of course, with a larger economic base, is in a better position to ramp up military ...


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I consider it improbable that there would be a total war. Miscalculation by one side or the other could lead to some skirmishes, but neither side would mobilize their full military-economic potential. You are asking about a conflict on Turkey's doorstep. By contrast, many EU members are quite far away. Their power projection might (or might not) benefit ...


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The website Global Firepower rates countries military strength on a scale it calls "PwrIndx". Turkey currently has a PwrIndx of nearly .21, ranking it #11 in the world. A lower number is stronger. If we compare that to the list of EU countries only France and the UK are stronger, with Italy and Germany close behind Turkey. Greece is rated over .5, ...


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The EU as such, not so much. If we are talking about individual countries, some do have signficant ressources (UK, France) and recent battle experience (mostly in assymetrical rather than high intensity warfare, though). There is no reason to think these militaries (along with support from countries like Germany, the Netherlands or Italy) would be completely ...


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