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5

Carabinieri in Italy are a military police force, but they are basically indistinguishable from the police (they have essentially the same tasks). I would bet that many Italians don't even know that they are technically a part of the army. A recent poll (January 2020) measured 'trust' in various Italian police forces. Polizia di Stato (civil police): 69% (-...


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New Zealand Background: Police in New Zealand do not typically carry firearms on their person, despite a longstanding stated desire from the police association to do so. Since 2012 pistols and semi-automatic rifles are stored in lock boxes in patrol cars, which may be accessed at the officer's discretion, but they must advise their command if they are going ...


4

Unclear This question should be answered by citing international studies on public trust in police institutions with a focus on militarization. Alas, a cursory search did not reveal any such studies. I have found, however, some information that may hint at an answer. Police militarization The study OP linked in their question defines police militarization as ...


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There is a lot of confusion regarding the French Gendarmerie, fueled by descriptions like “military police” or “military force with law enforcement duty” which are technically correct but do not fully reflect the nature and tactics of the force. Its members are indeed military officers, which has some legal consequences (trade unions are strictly forbidden, ...


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A (currently WIP) study entitled Militarization and Perceptions of Law Enforcement in the Developing World: Evidence from a Conjoint Experiment in Mexico by Flores-Macías, G., & Zarkin, J. looks at this factor in Mexico. This study uses data from an image-based conjoint experiment in a nationally representative survey, in which respondents were presented ...


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