84

tl;dr: Because the middle ages are over. You no longer want to be King - you want to be President Most of the world used to be ruled by kings and emperors, but today the only remaining absolute hereditary monarchies in the world are Saudi-Arabia, Brunei, Qatar, Oman and Eswatini. There are still lots of countries which are still officially hereditary ...


68

TLDR From natural-born citizens at least, no, you don't need to swear such allegiance, unless you're doing some very specific jobs. Even in such jobs, possible with some exceptional circumstances, one can be 'anti-Monarchist' without repercussion. I'm British, so I can comment on the "natural-born" part of this question. What I say below applies for such ...


64

Upon the Demise of the crown (which covers both the death of the current monarch or their abdication, or any other event ending the reign of the monarch), the next in succession immediately becomes the new monarch without any act of government or state required. The throne is never empty. If this happens during the time Parliament has been dissolved for a ...


55

I have been a Canadian my whole life and I do not recall ever being asked to "swear allegiance" to the monarch verbally. Generally the monarchy is popular in a celebrity kind of way and while there are some anti-monarchists I believe it is not a significant political issue. Since individual rights are important to Canadians (and I imagine similarly to the ...


48

No. I suggest the best source for this is probably the ruling of the Supreme Court itself. I'd encourage you to read it in full - it's not long and surprisingly readable. The legal argument the Court made starts by establishing that courts have the right to limit the use of the Royal Prerogative (for example, see paragraph 32). It further establishes ...


46

Several points. Not all of them (especially the first) are equally applicable in each case. But, most of the points apply to all of them. 1. Monarchies work well when the economy is dominated by rents from property. In Europe, monarchies gave way to representative government historically, because in an increasingly commercial economy, rents made up a ...


43

Another revolution, obviously. They did that in 1649. Much more likely, they would politely inform the Queen that the people don't seem to want a Queen any more. If that is really the case, and not just a vocal minority, then after some polite back and forth the Queen would probably step down rather than fighting a civil war which she is unlikely to win. ...


42

No. Succession to the British throne is determined by Parliament, not by the personal decision of the monarch. The relevant law is the Succession to the Crown Act (2013). This amends the 1701 Act of Settlement, and sets down that the oldest child of the monarch, whether male or female, will succeed to the throne upon the monarch's death. If Prince Charles ...


41

In the UK constitutional system, the Queen is not above the judiciary—she is the judiciary. As Wikipedia notes: The sovereign is deemed the "fount of justice"; although the sovereign does not personally rule in judicial cases, judicial functions are performed in his or her name. For instance, prosecutions are brought on the monarch's behalf, and courts ...


41

The short answer would be: Because even dictators cannot simply do whatever they want. Let's for example take a look at one of the oldest dictators of history: Caesar Augustus. Now, technically Augustus was a king in all but name, but couldn't effectively call himself one, because the Romans, since having deposed of their last king centuries ago, despised ...


40

This is a complete non-issue in the UK. For example, the leader of the opposition in Parliament, Jeremy Corbyn, has openly refused to sing the National Anthem when attending high profile, televised, public events such as a memorial service commemorating the anniversary of the Battle of Britain in WWII. It's hard to imagine any public figure "getting away ...


33

There are a number of things that would make you legally ineligible to succeed to the throne, but infidelity, (normal) criminal activity and immoral behaviour aren't to be found on that list. So, what would make you legally inadmissable? The Succession to the Crown Act 2013 indicates that if you're within the top six in line to the throne and you marry ...


33

Barbados was able to do so because under Article 49 of Barbados' Constitution, Parliament is empowered to alter the document through the passage of an Act through both of its Houses - as long as that bill is supported by at least two-thirds of the members of each House. The bill in this case, the Constitution (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 2021, had its first ...


29

The difference in this case is that Prince Charles already had two heirs from his first marriage with the deceased Princess Diana Spencer (Prince William and Prince Henry). Should he have another child with Camilla Parker Bowles (very unlikely, considering that she was 57 when they married), that child would have been 3rd in succession after Charles, but ...


28

There has been public confirmation that the Queen (and also Prince Charles) is on the standard circulation list for Cabinet memoranda. More directly, information about things like security arrangements for the royal family are obviously not for public consumption.


28

Official ceremonies (not the official birthday) are held in June to maximize the chance of having good weather. This is not something new for the UK's monarchy: Official celebrations to mark the Sovereigns' birthday have often been held on a day other than the actual birthday, particularly when the actual birthday has not been in the summer. King ...


28

The reason why parliament members in the United Kingdom must swear allegiance to the monarch is because the parliament decided that. The Oaths Act 1978 mandates who needs to swear what, when and how. It repealed and amended a series of previous oath acts from 1961, 1909, 1888 and 1838. The parliament could change the oath to the monarch yet again by making ...


27

Nitpick: there are no "medieval style monarchies" in Europe. Some monarchies may claim a lineage to medieval institutions, but that is not the same. And AFAIK, none is directly descending from those (except perhaps some Scandinavian ones), with most having had republican governments lapses. I think the style will depend wildly of the country, and ...


26

Royal Cypher The "E II R" is known as the royal cypher. In this case, it stands for Elizabeth II, Regina. The design of the royal cypher is not fixed; it doesn't have to take the form of Initial — Regnal Number — Title. They can be a bit more elaborate, such as that of King Charles II of Spain, which used three intertwined Cs. King Charles We do not know ...


26

British person here, swearing an oath of loyalty to the monarch only happens if you join government service of some kind (millitary, police, etc). Otherwise it almost never comes up. While I quite like the royals, a lot of people don't like them and are free to do so.


25

If anything it is the other way round. The key political difference between Sunni and Shia Islam is the status of the family of the prophet. In Shia Islam, God chose Ali, who was Muhammad's cousin and son-in-law, and Muhammad's closest blood relative as the leader of Muslims after Muhammad. The leaders of Shia Islam claim a direct bloodline to Ali. In ...


24

New citizens Others have discussed most about those having citizenship from birth. I will attempt to answer this part of your question: What about a non-natural person otherwise qualifying for citizenship or a passport ? United Kingdom To become a UK citizen, one must take an oath of allegiance. The text of the oath (from Wikipedia) is as follows: I, [...


24

The principal power of the Church of England in the House of Lords is vested in the Lords Spiritual - Church of England bishops who are granted seats in the House. Since the Bishopric of Manchester Act 1847, the number of Lords Spiritual has been set at 26. Five of these seats are granted automatically - the Archbishops of Canterbury and York and the Bishops ...


23

Article IV of the US Constitution says: The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, [...] So no, the Constitution explicitly forbids Congress from admitting a monarchy. States have immense latitude in the form of their republic, and the ultimate question of whether or not it is a republic is up to ...


20

When you start to consider the way the UK constitution works you need to distinguish clearly "The Queen" (a 93 year old woman who likes horses and Corgi dogs) from "The Queen" (Dei Gratia Monarch of the UK, embodiment of the power of the State). As the spelling is the same, it is easy to become confused, but The Queen is not the same as The Queen. The ...


19

When Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands abdicated, her new title became Her Royal Highness Princess Beatrix of the Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau, Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld which is the same title she held before her coronation. Source: Wikipedia


18

That's not Prince Andrew. If it was, and he wanted to call, he could do so. Your friend is dealing with an impersonator, who likely has a scam underway. The restraints on the behaviour of the royal family are conventions and their own judgement, rather than official rules. This shows up in various scandals, usually forgotten by the public after a while. ...


17

In the Netherlands the monarch may abdicate by signing an instrument of abdication. That transfers some titles held by the previous monarch to their successor. According to Wikipedia, when then Queen Beatrix abdicated in favor of her son who is now King Willem-Alexander: a number of titles previously held by Queen Beatrix (excluding those of Princess of ...


16

It has been a very long time since a nobility title meant a legal claim to the land. For example, some Arthur Wellesley guy was: Duke and Marquess of Wellington Prince of Waterloo, of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Duke of Ciudad Rodrigo (Spain) Duke of the Victory (from Portugal, but where exactly is "The Victory"?) and Marques of Torres Vedras among ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible