84

The "raid", which is the execution of a search warrant, is under the jurisdiction of the US Attorney's Office of the Southern District of New York, not that of the Mueller investigation. Mueller presumably referred whatever prompted the warrant to Rosenstein (deputy US Attorney General and his direct supervisor) specifically because it doesn't necessarily ...


57

While the question of whether Trump's actions would have resulted in felony charges is a matter of opinion (though the 1027 prosecutors who signed the letter you mentioned is strong evidence in the positive), it is a fact that Mueller specifically avoided making a judgement about indictable offenses and chose to stick to investigating and reporting the bare ...


53

You are correct that "collusion" is being used very loosely. There is no specific federal criminal statute that outlaws "collusion", for example (except for an antitrust law not relevant here). This NYTimes editorial argues that the term is a problem: The problem is that the focus on the term “collusion” has had the effect of implying precision where ...


44

Probably First, the report was heavily redacted. As such, some information is missing. Further, much of the information available in the Mueller report was previously available, so I won't try to determine which information is new, but rather summarize the evidence in the report. Was there a group based in Russia conducting social media operations? Yes. ...


29

... why is there then any possible debate on whether the report should be released to all members of Congress, completely unredacted? The U.S. House voted unanimously to release the Mueller report to the public. House Votes, 420-to-0, to Demand Public Release of Mueller Report ~ NY Times, March 4, 2019 The President has repeatedly concurred, saying ...


28

"Rosenstein gave him broad authority not only to investigate "any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated" with Trump's campaign, but also to examine "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation." [emphasis mine] No, there is no limit that requires Mueller to ignore evidence of other crimes....


25

As the following article perfectly fits your question, see: Julia Glum, Who is Rick Gates? Meet the Trump Adviser Indicted with Paul Manafort in Mueller Investigation, Newsweek, 30 October 2017 The following stems from the article above. Regarding the charges along with Paul Manafort (Trump former campaign manager), is facing charges for conspiracy ...


23

That's really irrelevant, since Mueller did not order the raids or get the warrants. What happens, and often happens is that, while investigating crimes, investigators sometimes find evidence of other crimes. They can: Pretend that the crimes never happened, which might be a crime, in and of itself. They can expand their investigation and go after the ...


20

Regarding the legal definition, Mueller did not establish criminal conspiracy: the report is very clear that Mueller’s investigation did not establish that the Trump campaign criminally conspired on illegal Russian election interference, or that it coordinated with Russia through either an active or tacit agreement. Using your definition - knowingly deal ...


19

No, there was no conspiracy to the extent that criminal charges for conspiring with the Russians could be brought against members of the Trump campaign My answer is based on the quote below from the executive summary of the first volume of the Mueller report (page 9 of the first volume, page 17 in the linked pdf). In the report this constitutes one ...


17

Article here All were charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States. Three defendants were charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and five defendants were charged with aggravated identity theft. Separately, Mueller’s office announced that Richard Pinedo, of Santa Paula, California, had pleaded guilty to identity ...


16

According to CNET, Mueller did find that Russia used a social media campaign to influence the US election in favor of Donald Trump. The campaign cost $35 million (the $100K the question is referring to is just the cost of ads): Mueller's investigation also found that Russia was backing a $35 million operation to meddle with US politics through social media. ...


15

FiveThirtyEight has a chart and an article that compares the current special counsel investigation to previous ones, accurate as of November 29, 2018. It's worth noting that the current special counsel has indicted many people abroad. Here's an older chart that labels the number of indictments of people abroad. As this article explains: There’s a problem, ...


15

Yes, but. Mueller made it crystal clear that he abided by the Department of Justice policy that a sitting president cannot be indicted -- or at least should not, because it basically gets in the way of running the country. That being said, take a look at footnote #1,091, which essentially invites to indict Trump once he's no longer in office. The text in ...


14

According to Stefan Becket of CBS News: The names of U.S. citizens who are caught on intercepts of foreign officials' communications are typically concealed in intelligence reports, but certain senior officials can request to learn their identities to better understand the information, a process known as "unmasking." According to an annual transparency ...


13

Did the Mueller report find that Trump committed any felonies? No. Because of the DOJ policy (that a sitting President cannot be indicted), Mueller did not consider the question of whether President Trump's actions rose to the level of an indictable offense. Which is a far, far cry from saying that anyone but the President would have been indicted for ...


12

A contemporary NY Times Article described what happened succinctly and in detail. No, fmr President Clinton does not have a criminal conviction. Nor was he charged with a crime. Napolitano is wrong on the facts of the deal to which he refers. Independent Counsel Robert Ray made a deal with fmr President Clinton on Clinton's last day in office. The deal ...


10

The NY Times profiled him in June Nearly everywhere Paul Manafort went, it seemed, Rick Gates followed, his protégé and junior partner. Election campaigns in Eastern Europe and Africa. Business ventures with a Russian tycoon. The upper ranks of Donald J. Trump’s presidential campaign. And later The two men met nearly three decades ago when Mr. Gates was ...


9

First off, consider the charges against Manafort. The actual charges, without interpretation. Manafort and Gates have not been indicted for 'collusion'. They have been indicted for tax evasion, and for not registering themselves as foreign agents with the US state department - which is required. The period of time in which these offenses occurred was 2005-...


9

OK, first of all, I'd like to stress that the question "why" is rather impossible to answer unless Mr. Mueller deems it worthwhile to create a StackExchange account and post an answer himself. Or grants an interview and answers that same question. (and even then, that would only answer "why according to Mueller's statement" which of course may or may not be ...


9

Mueller wasn't as hamstrung as you suggest. The fact that he detailed (at least) 10 probable obstruction of justice causes against Trump means obviously he did look into indictable offenses, even if he himself could not indict the president (following the DOJ doctrine that a sitting president may not be indicted). Most of the legal and journalistic opinion ...


8

The new Attorney-General will take over the investigation unless the new AG recuses himself too. This is because Jeff Sessions recused himself and that does not mean that all future AG need to recuse themselves. The special counsel is overseen by the AG, the Deputy AG only took over the investigation because the AG recused himself.


8

Collusion: "secret agreement or cooperation especially for an illegal or deceitful purpose" The media has been using Collusion as a catch all for other potential crimes that the Trump team is being accused of. I am not a lawyer, but the legal usage of Collusion would appear to be mostly limited to unfair market practices (e.g.: price fixing between two ...


8

New indictments in the Mueller report According to the New York Times which bases itself on a Justice Department Official: Mr. Mueller did not suggest additional charges as part of his investigation, when he delivered his findings to Mr. Barr on Friday. This caps the special counsel’s charges at 199, filed against 34 people and three companies. The “...


8

Some legal experts (Alan Dershowitz for one, IIRC) would say that Rosenstien exceeded his own authority by not referring the Cohen matter to Sessions, the Attorney General. The argument is that, while Sessions has recused himself in matters related to Russian interference in the election, that recusal does not give Rosenstein, in his supervisory role toward ...


8

Kenneth Star was an Independent Counsel, as you said. However, the law which created that provision expired in 1999. Mueller is a Special Counsel, which performs much the same purpose, but is authorized by Justice Department regulations rather than Congressional law. Thus there is no legal requirement for Mueller to submit a report to Congress, so he didn'...


7

For any normal citizen, a prosecutor can arrive at one of three conclusions: There is no evidence of misdeeds, so file under innocent. There is not enough evidence of misdeeds to fight in court, so file under innocent. There is plenty of evidence of misdeeds, so prosecute. But the US President isn't a normal citizen. There's a DOJ doctrine whereby he's too ...


7

The answer to your specific question (in the body of your OP), is very likely YES The report, while not looking to convict or even justify a conviction, was a collection of fairly damning evidence, that, should such evidence be presented against a person that was not a currently sitting president, would almost certainly have criminal charges brought before ...


7

On page 14 of the report, a footnote (partly redacted) says: SM-2230634, serial 44 (analysis). The FBI case number cited here, and other FBI case numbers identified in the report, should be treated as law enforcement sensitive given the context. This suggests that the SM-####### notation is an FBI case file number, included as reference for those who have ...


6

No, Trump was not interviewed, but the president has submitted written questions According to the introductory note of appendix C of the Mueller report (page C-1, page 417 in the pdf): Beginning in December 2017, this Office sought for more than a year to interview the President on topics relevant to both Russian-election interference and obstruction-of-...


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