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1

According to what I have read, the 1807 Insurrection Act allows the president to call the United States Armed Forces and the National Guard: When requested by a state's legislature, or governor if the legislature cannot be convened, to address an insurrection against that state (§ 251) To address an insurrection, in any state, which makes it impracticable ...


2

First, are presidents able to invoke the act whenever they feel its necessary? What’s the process for the act to be invoked? Here is the text of the code. The part shall take such measures as he considers necessary, appears to answer the first question. A proclamation to disperse and a signed order to the Department of Defense to activate troops would ...


3

The important thing to recognize is that while Britain may think of Ireland as a "mate", Ireland thinks of the British state as the former colonial power from which it won independence violently, which partitioned Ireland, and which ran a policy of state violence against Irish Catholics in Northern Ireland for decades until the peace treaty in 1998. (A plan ...


23

and sharing the same views regarding Global security. I think this is a fundamental flaw in your viewpoint. Ireland has demonstrated a very different viewpoint from the UK and US and their primary allies. This goes beyond any historic differences on Irish-centric security and derives primarily from Ireland very much seeing itself primarily as a European ...


39

Ireland has had a policy of neutrality as far as international relations are concerned since WWII. Although this has never been formally codified in their constitution, and indeed recently such an amendment was rejected, neutrality is an important part of Irish foreign policy which has also precluded the country from joining organisations such as NATO, where ...


16

FVEY developed from the second world war and the intelligence sharing between various allies during and after the war. Ireland was not allied to the UK and the USA during the war (it remained technically neutral) Moreover Ireland was not part of the Commonwealth, and the "five eyes" club was an agreement to share intelligence between the US and the British, ...


2

Any risk presented by conducting such interviews is presumably far lower than the risk of not conducting them. The question seems to assume that the fact that a person is being considered for top secret security clearance is in itself sensitive information. But in fact it's often obvious if someone you know personally has security clearance, even if you ...


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