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6

The premise of the question is that Russia/China would want to arm the North Korea and other rogue regimes just to spite the US and NATO or simply for financial gain. I think their actual calculation is more subtle. Moreover, one argurably draws more benefit from the possibility of selling that from the actual sale. Let me give just a few considerations: ...


4

Even during Soviet era... Russia was so smart to not sell "good" weapons to their nearby countries, that as you know were willing to do rebellions. Bonus answers = in fact the idea of soviet technologies during cold war was not real, analysts analyse weapons of the countries outside russia but as Surokov tells in is book "inside the soviet ...


32

Why would both China and Russia want to modernize North Korean army in the first place? They both (mainly China) derive some benefits from the NK behavior, but they don't completely control NK (that's the point of being a sovereign, after all). On one hand, any improvement in the NK military potential will force both China and Russia, as well as other ...


31

Your premise is incorrect as to the state of the DPRK army. The Chonma-ho may not be up to the standards of an Abrams, but it is much more modern than the T-34. It is unclear if the DPRK really has operational ICBMs. They certainly haven't done as many (successful or unsuccessful) tests as the USA and the Soviet Union did during the cold war. Are their ...


36

Maybe this is a bit of circular reasoning, but UN sanctions prohibit countries from supplying North Korea with such weapons (and much more). You might say this reasoning is circular because China or Russia could have prevented these UN resolutions by vetoing them, but they didn't. As for weapons, there is Resolution 1718 passed in 2006, which according to ...


3

A Reuters article from May 1, 2020 examined the issue in a manner that remains sound. While there is not a clearly established line of succession, the bottom line is that Kim Yo Jong, the current leader's younger sister, or Choe Ryong Hae, who is North Korea's nominal head of state, would be most likely to become the ruler of North Korea if Kim Jong Un died. ...


2

To add to the answer by Italian Philosophers 4 Monica, one might ask if there is a succession plan right now, who that designated successor is, and finally if the plan will come through. Various outside Pyongyang analysts point to the likely importance of the OGD, the Organization and Guidance Department. This report is a bit dated, but it lists a number ...


8

Fact is we don't really know, but that can be considered an answer in itself. To quote Winston Churchill (possibly): Kremlin political intrigues are comparable to a bulldog fight under a rug. An outsider only hears the growling, and when he sees the bones fly out from beneath it is obvious who won. The Economist had IIRC an article about a year ago ...


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