11

The assumption that the EU is not doing anything about the occupation of one of its member states is incorrect. The EU's support of its member state is primarily in the diplomatic sphere, including supporting a wider economic embargo. European Union law pertains in Cyprus on the basis of Cyprus's sovereign decision to join the EU, so EU law pertains where ...


5

It's either relatively easy or completely impossible. It really depends on whether you can prove your family was on the island before 1974. If you can, obtaining a passport isn't too difficult (at least since 2003-2004). You have to travel to some office in the Greek part of Nicosia (IIRC) and you can even get served in the Turkish language by the Republic ...


4

Cyprus and the international community have, from the start of the conflict, always considered the Turkish army to be an invading force. That is, Cyprus would consider the northerners to be its own citizens. And sure enough, it does with a caveat: Turkish Cypriots may obtain Cypriot passports and ID cards if they can prove their descent from a citizen of ...


3

I am married to a Turkish Cypriot. She was born pre-1974 at the British Military Hospital in Nicosia, which did in fact create some difficulties later in life when she decided to apply for a 'kimlik' (ID card) in the TRNC. This was because neither administration would accept a British birth certificate as legal evidence of jurisdiction. Searches for a ...


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