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178 votes

Why don't Democrats and Republicans collude?

I mean, we've had exclusively Democrat or Republican governments for well over 150 years, I'm not sure how else you'd measure "total and perpetual dominance".
David Rice's user avatar
  • 4,850
117 votes
Accepted

Why are masks a political topic in the US?

David Easton (a major figure in modern political science) defined governance as the 'authoritative allocation of values', meaning that a government decides what values the community it serves will ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 69.2k
90 votes

Why does the UK have more political parties than the US?

One reason why the UK has more parties than the US is simply that it is cheaper to compete in the political game. General election campaigning is effectively limited to four weeks before the election ...
alephzero's user avatar
  • 2,234
86 votes
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Why does the UK have more political parties than the US?

Duverger's law says that for a given district in a plurality (first-past-the-post) system, the number of parties will tend towards two. In the United States, there is an office with a national ...
Brythan's user avatar
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84 votes
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Why is there such a partisan divide on confidence in science in the US?

A good explanation might be confirmation bias. Confirmation bias in a nutshell is the psychological phenomenon that people generally tend to trust information which supports their views and distrusts ...
Philipp's user avatar
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83 votes
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Why did the DNC try to prevent Bernie Sanders from getting the Democratic nomination?

In short, because Democratic Party in USA is roughly split between two factions (I'll label them "progressive" and "establishment" just for the sake of labeling). FiveThirtyEight covered this split ...
user4012's user avatar
  • 92.5k
83 votes

Why don't Democrats and Republicans collude?

Let's imagine that this were to actually happen. Major members of the two parties realized that what you said was true, and that if they could cooperate then they would totally and completely dominate ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 15.4k
82 votes

Why are "the rich" more able to identify the party which represent their interests than "the poor"?

Why are “the rich” more able to identify the party which represent their interests than “the poor”? Mostly, because your assumption is just that, an assumption, and is an incorrect one at that. I won'...
user4012's user avatar
  • 92.5k
80 votes

Why are "the rich" more able to identify the party which represent their interests than "the poor"?

There are so many false assumptions in your question. But one that wasn't addressed by the other answers is this: There are a lot of people who vote based on their moral principles. Whether rich or ...
David Schwartz's user avatar
74 votes

Why isn't there a serious attempt at creating a third mass-appeal party in the US?

Because the two main parties absorb emergent third parties Any time any third party starts to get serious traction in the United States, it eventually will find one of the major parties shifting its ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 15.7k
72 votes
Accepted

What is the perception of European parties in the US?

Does the American public know, that their perception of left and right is is skewed and right-shifted in comparison to many other Western countries? The American public is mostly oblivious to the ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 80.3k
66 votes

Why did the DNC try to prevent Bernie Sanders from getting the Democratic nomination?

The idea that the DNC "rigged" the primaries is false. I voted Bernie in the primary, too, but it is very important not to take the claim in the WikiLeaks graphic at face value. This July ...
BradC's user avatar
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64 votes
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Does the US political system, in principle, allow for a no-party system?

George Washington said: However [political parties] may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, ...
Brythan's user avatar
  • 89.6k
64 votes

Has there ever been a successful shift from a two-party system to a multi-party system in modern history?

New Zealand switched from first-past-the-post to "mixed member proportional representation (MMP)" starting in the 1996 election (https://nzhistory.govt.nz/politics/fpp-to-mmp). Seats won by ...
user103496's user avatar
  • 5,545
60 votes
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Has politics always been so polarized?

Polarisation is not entirely new, but it’s not a constant either. Looking just at US national politics, there have been other periods of very strong polarisation (e.g. the late 19th century, ...
Peter LeFanu Lumsdaine's user avatar
59 votes
Accepted

Why did political parties form in the United States?

A safeguard WAS put into place. We call it the Electoral College (although it is not named as such in the Constitution). It failed miserably at that goal. The original vision when the Electoral ...
Wes Sayeed's user avatar
  • 12.1k
59 votes

Why are masks a political topic in the US?

Why are masks political? Because the handling of the pandemic has become a political issue. The President took a clear position. In a bipartisan, hyperpartisan climate, loyalists of the President must ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 109k
56 votes

Why do veterans skew right in the US?

The modern US military is self-selecting — a professional army, not a conscripted one — so I doubt this effect would hold true historically. But as a rule, the political Right tends to value military ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 69.2k
55 votes

Why do one-party states still have a party at all?

While it needn't be this way, per se, political parties and the government are often separate institutions as a matter of having different operational objectives. The job of the government is to run ...
William Walker III's user avatar
54 votes
Accepted

Could a US political party gain complete control over the government by removing checks & balances?

Institutions and constitutional arrangements are important as they provide a buffer against temporary excesses, but the ultimate check is civil society, really. Otherwise look at Hungary, Turkey, etc. ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
54 votes
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How far can gerrymandering go?

This is a rather simple mathematical exercise. If you allow me total freedom to draw districts within the current requirements, I can place anyone in any district I want provided they have equal ...
eyeballfrog's user avatar
  • 1,813
54 votes

Why does Trump want a citizenship question on the census?

I think the best is for you to dive into the following two podcasts (both have a transcript) of Chris Hayes interviewing Dale Ho, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit (and won) against the Trump ...
Denis de Bernardy's user avatar
54 votes
Accepted

Why has no party ever won a majority in Israel?

Israel's elections are based on nation-wide proportional representation. Specifically, that means there are no local districts in which candidates run. Your assertion that many parliamentary ...
JJJ's user avatar
  • 39.1k
49 votes

Has politics always been so polarized?

Personal animosity between political opponents is widespread and historic. It is particularly common in democracies. In an oligarchical or dictatorial state, power and influence depends on your ...
James K's user avatar
  • 121k
47 votes
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The politicization of the supreme court

How political parties view things is not necessarily commensurate with reality. After all, they have a political agenda to push. In this case the view of (federal) judges—Supreme Court Justices or ...
zibadawa timmy's user avatar
45 votes

Why does partisanship trump concerns about hypocrisy with voters?

Short answer: everybody hates somebody, and by extension that person/group's cherished pet cause. Seriously. Consider the following conversation: Person A: Hey there gun owner, did you know that you ...
Jared Smith's user avatar
  • 8,647
44 votes

What does "bipartisan support" mean in the United States?

This is entirely dependent on the speaker. But in general senior politicians who have passed legislation are happy to call it Bipartisan on the basis on a single vote. Nancy Pelosi claimed to have 275 ...
Jontia's user avatar
  • 24.7k
42 votes

What kind of amendment can oblige multiple political parties, and repair the unintended two-party malfunction of the constitution?

A false premise What kind of amendment clause can encourage many parties to represent the voters in the way originally intended by the founding fathers? The Founding Fathers intended the ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 80.3k
41 votes
Accepted

Can an American state ban a (minor) political party?

A state cannot ban a political party for being a political party, no. This would run headlong into the 1st Amendment so hard it would go viral on TikTok. There are a number of ways that a majority ...
William Walker III's user avatar
39 votes
Accepted

Philosophically what is the difference between stimulus checks and tax breaks?

Discounting the surrounding flora, your question seems to be fairly clear: what's the difference between tax breaks and stimulus checks? (It becomes less clear when introducing the word "...
So_about_that's user avatar

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