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82

A good explanation might be confirmation bias. Confirmation bias in a nutshell is the psychological phenomenon that people generally tend to trust information which supports their views and distrusts information which contradicts their views. And this trust or distrust does of course extend to those who provide that information. And it just so happens that ...


74

Because the two main parties absorb emergent third parties Any time any third party starts to get serious traction in the United States, it eventually will find one of the major parties shifting its platform to absorb those voters into its coalition. Unlike most of the other parties in America, the Democrats and the Republicans are both in the business of ...


30

In terms of not achieving the nomination of their party due to losing the primary contests directly, no. However, there have been times when the incumbent president seeking re-election has pulled out of the contest early, for example in 1968 when Lyndon B. Johnson pulled out of the race after winning the first primary in New Hampshire by only 7 percent - ...


23

I think that you are looking at too much rational level concerning people's reaction. Look a bit more at ideology: Whoever shares your views (whichever they are), would seem to you be a nice, trustworthy person who would do lot's of good in the world. There would be also a grain of truth in it, as it would be easier to get on with like minded people. In the ...


20

To understand the modern partisan divide over science, we need to go back to the origins of the Christian Fundamentalist movement in the late 19th century. There's an article on it in Brittanica that's worth reading in its entirety, but it sums up things nicely in the opening paragraph: Christian Fundamentalism [is a] movement in American Protestantism ...


18

No incumbent president has lost his primary race, but you have to keep in mind that primaries are a 20th century invention basically. The 1976 campaign season was the year in which primaries started to matter more than ever before, and is considered the closest a sitting President has come to losing his party’s nomination in modern history. President ...


18

The question as titled comprises two related but distinct issues. What is the quality of scientific data? Unfortunately, "science" is an unhelpfully broad category here, and "the scientific method", while a useful illustration for school children, is a very rough approximation for how the sausage gets made. Even in the "hardest" of sciences (e.g., high-...


14

In Germany there is die PARTEI (using the six letters to spell out Party for Labour, Rule of Law, Animal Welfare, Promotion of Elites and Grassroots Movements in German). They were founded by the staff of the monthy satirical magazine Titanic. They have gained some minor election success, including MEPs. There also was/is the APPD, whose platform was to ...


14

Compared to US parties, all of them with the possible exception of the AfD are leftist. Most favor public healthcare for all, for instance, and a government role in the pension system. The German system of proportional representation with a cutoff encourages large and medium parties, not very small ones. A party which consistently scores below 5% is likely ...


13

It's important to check if the Republican party actually has a high appeal with Christians. And if so, with which denominations. The Pew Research Center has data on this, showing that Catholics actually lean slightly towards Democrats, mainline Protestants lean slightly towards Republicans, but this tendency only becomes prominent with more radical ...


12

The notion of right or left is rather fuzzy in practice. There's some truth in the statement that led to your question with respect to a few policy aspects; not so much with respect to others. For instance, consider the UK's single payer health care system. The Conservatives know it is political suicide for them to seek to privatizing it. The US equivalent ...


12

As the people in the party won't cease to exist, it is generally unlikely that a party can completely vanish. Those people are likely to be in some party. But a mainstream party can cease to exist by merging, splitting, fading, rebranding or formal dissolution. As examples, The SDP was a major party in the 1980s. It had similar policies to the Liberal ...


12

Links to some scholarly analysis on the topic at the bottom The first thing to understand when addressing this topic is that our political parties are not monolithic organizations with a single set of beliefs. In some political systems there are many parties with more specific ideals, and in order to reach a majority to gain control it often requires two ...


12

A 'tea party' is a social gathering, usually in the afternoon, at which tea and light refreshments are served. It is a calm and somewhat formal affair, and in the USA, it is commonly associated with the British. In the early USA, self-effacing humor was a large part of American identity. For example, Yankee Doodle was originally sung by British soldiers in ...


11

I'll address part of the issue with something of a frame challenge. It is a common misunderstanding, which you seem to be falling prey to, to think of the Democratic and Republican parties as largely homogeneous monoliths. In fact they are more like coalitions of parties, which can vary widely (especially across geography). For examples: The Democrats ...


9

@Joe's answer gives excellent concrete examples of how a party moves toward 'the center'. For a theoretical explanation, see The Median Voter Theorem and Hotelling's Game. If a platform or policy becomes popular, then it is picked up by one of the two major parties. An example is the Democratic party adoption of cannabis reform. The two major parties also ...


9

The closest example I can think of is Singapore's Non-Constituency MP and Nominated MP systems. Singapore is a single party democracy that uses a UK-style constituency system. In 2015 the ruling PAP party won 83 contested seats, compared to just 6 for the WP opposition (and none for anyone else). However, WP were awarded an additional 3 non-constituency MPs ...


8

On face value there isn't an obvious difference between the two. Both parties are the spiritual successors of factions in the Irish Civil War. Fine Gael were a 1933 merger of pro-treaty parties, while Fianna Fáil split from anti-treaty Sinn Fein in 1926. However, we can make some generalisations, which various journalists have noted. This mostly ...


8

Individual elected AfD representatives and local AfD groups have referenced Soros, usually accompanied with classical antisemitism stereotypes (shify, puppeteer, financier of the great replacement, in league with the devil, volkszersetzend, etc) The AFD Saltzgitter shared an image displaying Soros in league with the devil, saying that he finances illegal ...


7

I'm from Middle East but I live in the US for a couple of years now. I will talk about my knowledge about political parties mainly in Iran, which you may consider them as Islamist if you want. At least, totalitarian regime of Iran itself claims that they are Islamist. So, basically my answer to your question is Yes. There are both conservative parties with ...


7

Because independents aren't politically uniform. They don't necessarily have any more in common with each other than they do with members of the major parties. To refer to a voter as 'independent-leaning' is a contradiction – they are declaring that they don't 'lean on' the views of any political group! Your four possible explanations all assume that there ...


7

Historically the SDLP was committed to peace while Sinn Fein was the political wing of the Provisional IRA terrorists. John Hume (SDLP leader and Nobel Peace prize laureate) was instrumental to bringing peace to Northern Ireland. Martin McGuiness (leading Sinn Fein politician) was an admited IRA member, convicted for involvement in bomb-making, and deemed ...


7

While Change UK may have been the highest profile party to have lasted not very long at all, it's not alone in this regard. The Trust Party was founded just a few weeks before the 2010 election, in the wake of the Parliamentary Expenses Scandal. While I cannot find an exact date of dissolution for this party, it was reportedly dissolved not long after the ...


6

In Hungary we have the Two-tailed Dog Party. I'm not fluent enough in Hungarian to catch all of the wordplays they're using, but my wife consistently finds their campaign ads and messages hilarious. Sweat shirt they released last year: Banksy reference:


6

This article explains: At the time, the event that took place in Boston on the night of December 16, 1773 was not called the “Tea Party.” For more than 50 years, if it was mentioned at all in print, it was usually as “the destruction of the tea.” Bostonians never celebrated it as they did their triumphs over other British measures. Patriot leaders cited ...


5

I've approached this question by looking at the General Election before each party leader attained their post, for Westminster party leaders of the Lib Dem, Labour, & Conservative parties selected since the 1992 GE. I then look at the distribution of 'percentage majority' among MPs of the same party, and find the percentile in which the leader appeared. ...


5

This pattern has developed in a number of countries, often following some significant political disruption. For example in Japan and South Africa, a single party wins nearly all elections. In both countries there was a significant disruption (World war 2, the Apartheid struggle) Similarly in Singapore there was the Malay war and independence from Malaysia. ...


5

In addition to the answers given here, there is a simple cost/benefit analysis to consider: If you possess the resources required to start a viable large third party, and/or to take one of the existing minor parties and make it mainstream: A very large voter base A deep pool of organizers in all 50 states Significant funding A non-zero number of potential ...


5

The terms "Socialist" or "Marxist" can be used either to make fine distinctions within the leftist spectrum or as a pejorative against anyone to the left of the speaker. (Note that "Fascist" has the same dual use.) Calling Labour "Marxist" is either pejorative or simply misinformed. There were Labour governments in the UK both during the Cold War and ...


5

This is a Romanian perspective I think there is no actual connection between backing Klaus Iohannis and notifying the Constitutional Court about the Roman Catholic Theological High School in Târgu Mureş. Backing Klaus Iohannis is very good for the party because he is a very popular politician who proved his efficiency as a mayor in Sibiu and has clear pro-...


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