8

Define "centrism" It's a word that comes up a lot, but what is it? It's not an ideological package of its own. My own expression of it would be something like Blairism and "triangulation": explicitly picking popular points from left and right and trying to find a fusion to appeal to moderate voters from both poles. So for Blairism the compromise was tax ...


7

The Morning Consult poll you refer to is just the latest in a series of polls they have conducted on the topic of COVID-19. They have also conducted similar surveys from Feb. 7-9, Feb. 24-26, Feb. 28-March 1, March 3-5, March 6-9, March 12-13, March 13-16, March 17-20, March 31-April 1, and April 10-12. Some of the earlier polls don't address the exact ...


7

This subject is examined in the "How Polarized are Citizens? Measuring Ideology from the Ground-Up" paper from 2018. Of interest to this specific question is Figure 8: Polarization by Country on page 39, which indicates that Denmark and Iceland have the least amount of polarization of the countries listed. The paper goes into quite some detail on their ...


6

One way this is measured is public polls. This can be direct public perception polls of another party: Partisan antipathy rose dramatically compared with 1994, when only 21 percent of Republicans and 17 percent of Democrats had highly unfavorable views of the other. By 2016, those figures had risen to 58 percent and 55 percent, respectively. Even more ...


5

This is a rather tentative/stub answer because the literature in this area is pretty vast, and there are apparently some plus-sides to polarization, namely, reducing corruption. But to answer the question in the direction that was asked, i.e. what are the arguments against polarization, here are some such arguments that were advanced in the academic ...


5

This is not an easy question to answer because there's not a total agreement on how to measure political polarization. The typical conundrum is to rank the examples shown below: Having said that, measures used in the literature correlate to some extent: But if you want to pick an extreme, it will probably vary by measure used. It will also vary on the ...


5

It is the interaction of multiple factors, started by the development of 24/7 media and catalyzed by the rise of social media. The shift in politics is symptomatic of the shift in the perception of the populace. For the US, two recent academic studies have captured the possible cause. The Hidden Tribes of America This More in Common study viewed the actual ...


4

Try this column "When Normal is Insufficient" by Canadian conservative pundit Mark Steyn, for example, particularly the part beginning "Some of us can claim to have seen this coming." Relevant excerpt: Another old line of mine: If respectable politicians are forbidden to raise certain subjects, the voters will turn to unrespectable ones. The people are ...


3

Mixture of factors, warning EU-centric answer: Lack of seducing ideas How exactly the mainstream parties differ from each other when the main right wing party and main left wing party have no problem to form a coalition? Works in the EU on "federal" level, works in Germany. British Torries are introducing homosexual marriages while German economy is ...


3

There is a widespread misunderstanding of what the fairness doctrine is actually about. It may also be said that it is something that is brought out as an excuse to browbeat either one side or the other. The myth is that the fairness doctrine means that equal time is given to all sides of the issue. This is not true neither in the text nor the actual ...


3

What has caused the decline of parties in the center? Dilution and a change in definition of what the centre is. The parties in the centre decline, but the centre itself does not. Voters are actually far less radical than they were 60 years ago. In the 1950s, and 1960s, social democratic parties in (for example) West Germany wanted to nationalise major ...


3

No and [then] yes, depending on the time frame. The first dimension of DW-NOMINATE, which measures the vote separation on the conservative-liberal axis has been increasing since the 1970s, after reaching a minimum in the 1950s. Figures 2.3 and 2.4 show both the degree of heterogeneity between the parties and the degree of homogeneity within the ...


2

It's a somewhat complex topic (hence the belated answer). Ideological polarization between political parties has been measured for years (in various ways). From a recent paper summarizing the approaches: Definitions of political polarization usually involve distances in policy stances or attitudes between groups of people, parties, or specific ...


2

There's no way to tell, because a lot of other things have changed in that time period. Even if broadcasters are more one-sided, there's a larger number of broadcasters, allowing greater market segmentation and content customization than when 4 major network's nightly broadcasts were "the news". Adding YouTube and other online offerings into the mix, there's ...


1

Has this finding (of independence of fractionalization from polarization) been confirmed/replicated in other studies (which potentially use a different methodology and/or data set)? It seems plausible that it would be, although measuring political distance is inherently a problematic concept without better definition of what is meant by it. It is also ...


1

This article gives 14 reasons why political polarization has increased. The FCC fairness rule is not mentioned directly, but "media ghettos" are given as one of the reasons.


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