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2

The question seems to assume that the law enforcers were happy with the regime that was just overthrown and suddenly found them with a new regime whose rules they disapprove. After a new regime is instituted, there may be a purge of the members of law enforcement that disagree with it. But a kind of purge can happen before a military coup. Subordinates that ...


26

As an example (related, but not the same as o.m.'s answer), of what not to do, was the de-Baathification program launched by the US after the 2003 invasion. Without getting involved on whether the invasion was a good idea or not (it wasn't), on the surface, de-Baathification seemed reasonable enough: Sadaam's regime had been quite oppressive to most of the ...


27

Depends on the kind of change. And on what the new regime wants. Take the German Reunification as an example. Junior Communist officials and officers remained in office, but their promotion prospects were severely limited. Senior officials were pensioned, many with lower pensions than they had expected under Communist rule. Individuals at all ranks were ...


10

Often you have to be a certified law enforcement officer to run for the position. Many counties in the U.S. are rural and have very low populations, with a small pool of potential candidates. Once someone wins an election once, they have a great incumbency edge in subsequent elections, over the other viable candidates, who are usually their subordinates or ...


2

I will just give the example about Denmark. There has been a fair amount of trials about police brutality. Not anything comparable to the examples from the US but resulting in big bruises and broken bones. A police officer has never lost any of those cases. Not a single case.


8

To answer your question, one would have to look at formal and informal legal immunity. That is, is it legally possible for a citizen to sue/charge a police officer, and is it practically possible? Another issue is the difference between a civil lawsuit, filed by a citizen, and a criminal charge filed by the prosecutor after credible complaints by a citizen. ...


-9

Well there are already great structural differences with policing in Britain and that of the USA. For a start, they do not routinely carry fire-arms and hence they're not immune from charges from carrying weapons if they did so routinely. This is how policing is done in Britain.


-3

Well, the President is Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces and there is also the Joint Chief of Staff. Given that the USA government is wary of concentrating all forces under one command - after all this is why the government has a tripartite structure with the legislative, executive and judicial branches; then it's only natural that there is a similar ...


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