27

Basically, most of Trump's nominees are still awaiting to clear the respective Senate committees. As seen from The Washington Post graphic that you cited, most of the nominees are only referred to the respective Senate committee in May, which is just a month ago. Nominations must be formally submitted to the relevant Senate committee before a vote in the ...


16

A recent Business Insider article reported on this: His White House has seen more firings, resignations, and reassignments in its first year than any other young administration in modern history. The president's senior staff turnover rate during his first year in office was three-times higher than both Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton ...


11

Yes, according to the Senate Historical Office's list of appointed Senators since 19131. The following three states never had any appointed Senators since 1913: Maryland Utah Wisconsin 1913 is the year in which the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified. It established means of filling vacant Senate seats and the direct ...


11

We can find a high-level overview of the documents in the response from the National Archives to the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Charles Grassley, sent on August 2, 2018. This letter was a response to the official request (full text) from the Committee sent on July 27. It contains an estimate of the processing time needed and the general overview ...


11

Why do we bother having these things? What goal do they serve? Technically, because these things are in the Constitution (Article II, Section 2), to change that you need a constitutional amendment and no one proposed that. The reason is that the confirmation process is the only thing stopping the Executive branch from appointing whomever they want without ...


7

No rules were broken. Republicans used their majority to change Senate committee rules. The senate has rules on what's known as quorum. Quorum basically means the minimum number of people that must be present for normal business to occur. Quorum rules, especially for committees, are defined by the senate and for the senate. Due to Trump's executive order ...


7

From Wall Street on Parade: Steve Bannon Steve Mnuchin, Secretary of the Treasury Gary Cohn, Director of the National Economic Council Jay Clayton, Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission Note that Mnuchin and Clayton will require Senate confirmation. Not sure about Cohn. Bannon does not and is already part of the administration. Erin ...


7

There are about 100 US attorneys. The position is a technical one, since the post is non-political. The requirements for the job are one's skills as a lawyer. Presidents have a busy job, and for relatively minor appointments they may choose to act on the advice of the relevant department on the most suitable candidate. A president may simply feel that they ...


6

Politifact cited the same Brookings Institute study in 2018 After a year and a half, 57 percent of Trump’s top White House positions changed hands. (This analysis covers 65 positions.) For context, after two years in office, Barack Obama’s White House had a 24 percent turnover rate, George W. Bush had 33 percent, Clinton had 38 percent, George H. W. Bush ...


5

Unlike the Senate (where each state has its own rules), the Constitution mandates replacement by special election Vacancies in the House of Representatives typically take far longer to fill. The Constitution requires that member of the House be replaced only by an election held in the congressional district of the former representative. "When vacancies ...


5

Unless the committee is specifically in closed session, the public may walk into any committee hearing at any time, no charge or fee needed. Congress is "the People's House" and part of the set up government is that citizens may freely walk the halls and attempt to talk to politicians who were making their rounds. Speaking as a political nerd, it's kind of ...


5

There aren't many direct studies on being in elected/appointed positions making you more likely to exhibit criminal behavior. There are more generalized studies that seem to imply that there is a possible link. People with more power are better liars/ more dishonest . There are also studies that seem to prove that power leads to corruption. Leaders also tend ...


4

President Obama nominated 3 Republicans to his Cabinet, but ultimately only two served. They are Robert Gates (Secretary of Defense, originally appointed by G.W. Bush and retained), Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood (Representative from Illinois), and Judd Gregg (Senator from New Hampshire and former Governor). Gregg withdrew his name from consideration ...


4

I believe this is without precedent. A Vox article notes that "Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso lost his Republican Senate primary in 1996, and was appointed to take on a Senate seat in 2007 after Sen. Craig Thomas died", but "the rapid-fire timing on this is uncommon". This suggests that the journalist was unable to find a better example of a losing candidate ...


4

Look to the Constitution of the United States, specifically Article II, Section II, Clause II. [The President] shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, ...


4

Theoretically, sure, but after the first rejection I would strongly doubt the nominee would get another hearing before Congress. All the Senate would have to do is ignore the President because, ultimately, it would be the administration that would suffer since whatever post that the nomination was for would go unfilled. Much of the law surrounding who has ...


4

https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/employee-relations/employee-rights-appeals/#url=Overview is a decent place to start looking into the relevant law, but the short answer to your question is that no one person in the federal government, including the President, has the power to fire a career appointment employee without due process. Exactly what due ...


4

I don't think the vacancies are deliberate. Trump has been unusually slow in nominating people in general The Senate has confirmed 26 of Trump’s picks for his Cabinet and other top posts. But for 530 other vacant senior-level jobs requiring Senate confirmation, the president has advanced just 37 nominees, according to data tracked by The Washington Post and ...


3

With all of the big headlines in the news recently, this seems to be something that has largely been overlooked by the press. As far as "analyst consensus" goes, I can't seem to find any. However, there is readily accessible data that you can look at to determine precedent. Also, as of February 10th, 2017, Edith Ramirez's resignation has taken effect. This ...


2

No, the Republicans did not break a rule. It turns out, according to Vox, Wednesday, Republicans deployed a workaround — Republicans on the committee used a "unanimous consent" clause to suspend all of its rules for the meeting, then voted to confirm the nominations for Steven Mnuchin, up for Treasury secretary, and Tom Price, nominated for Health and ...


2

Well, all presidents have been men, until the 1980s all justices were men, and same sex marriage has only been available since the 1990s. So until the 1980s, no one could have nominated a spouse. No justices are openly in a same sex relationship, so we can put aside any male spouses being nominated. There is only one female justice who is not currently ...


2

Even as the minority party, the Democrats have been delaying a lot of appointments by requiring 30 hours of debate after a cloture vote. This can only delay a particular appointment by those 30 hours. But, given that there are hundreds of positions to be filled, the cumulative effect has slowed down the overall rate of confirmations to a great degree. The ...


2

PoloHoleSet's answer is entirely right about this specific case. In the more general case, the Constitution specifies (emphasis mine): When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies [Article I, Section 2] for Representatives vs When vacancies happen in ...


1

Firstly, it should be noted that one of the points in this question has been rendered moot, since Trump has now (as of August 2) announced he will not nominate John Ratcliffe as his intelligence chief. One of the proposed reasons for the withdrawal is that: He got a very cool reception from Senate Republicans. Most of their statements praised the outgoing ...


1

Governors, generally speaking, are the ones who appoint US Senators to fill vacancies in that body (though not in all states). I'm not aware of any states where they appoint Representatives for vacancies in the House. For Michigan, the state law requires a special election to fill vacancies. If Conyers' district is overwhelmingly Democratic, then it's a ...


1

All federal judges are appointed to lifetime terms, as per the constitution. The phrasing is a bit weird, so I won't quote it. States may, like anything else, set their own rules. There is no (federal) constitutional requirement that non-federal judges be appointed or elected. There is thus no rule that can be identified. Balllotpedia has a nice ...


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