155

@POTUS, according to Twitter (https://www.wsj.com/articles/twitter-says-it-is-permanently-suspending-account-of-president-trump-11610148903), is the 'official' account for the Office of the President of the United States. It is a de facto arm of the executive branch in the same way that any other public-communications aspect of the office would be. (...


47

There are no grounds for the President to declare the Supreme Court 'politically illegitimate' given that the Supreme Court is an institution that is directly established by the Constitution. Such a declaration would be grounds for the impeachment of the President, in my opinion. However, the online Constitutional Rights Foundation points out: President ...


32

These statements aren't saying that the US President is waiving patent protections, but that the administration supports waiving patent protections. Specifically, the current administration is voicing support for a request to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to temporarily allow its members to ignore their obligations to protect other nations' patents. In ...


28

Any political system — and I'm using the term 'any' in the strong sense — operates on the basis of political norms. Political norms are not enshrined in laws, statutes, constitutions, or institutions. Political norms are attitudes we share towards those things: respect for the law, recognition of authority and delegated power, acceptance of community ...


25

By only tweeting official things from @POTUS, Biden isn't making @JoeBiden a public forum. A circuit court ruled that Donald Trump's use of his personal Twitter account for public statements meant that blocking people on it contravened their First Amendment rights.


12

I'm not a patent lawyer and the legislative framework regarding the status of the WTO agreements in the US is pretty complex, but under FSIA a US company by itself doesn't have a lot of recourse if a foreign government decides to compulsorily license a US patent to a company in that foreign country. Basically the US company mostly can't sue the foreign ...


11

This is a weird question. The Supreme Court is established in the Constitution. A President that ignores the rulings of the Supreme Court is therefore not upholding the Constitution. That would break their vow of office, which is the part of the Constitution that says "you have to obey the constitution". Can a President break their vow? Well ...


10

A piece of paper is just a piece of paper A piece of paper can't make anybody do anything. When a judge writes a bunch of words on a piece of paper and signs it, that does nothing by itself. And yet when a judge speaks, those words have power. Why? Because the system has chosen to invest them with power. But what does that mean - and how does it come to ...


9

Yes, the President of the United States has a passport, according to the Washington Post. However, it is not the kind of ordinary passport that most Americans would get, but rather, it is a Diplomatic Passport.


6

Concession in the US presidential election is a political courtesy, not a constitutional obligation. It is common practice in the United States for the losing candidate to concede as soon as the election results from the states are published and their defeat becomes obvious. Note that at that point they technically didn't lose the election yet, because the ...


3

Without diving into court statistics, the answer is: probably, though it's impossible to be sure. What Biden was trying to avoid by waiting to comment on the case was the appearance of unduly influencing the jury and not without good reason. External influences on jurors during a trial is a major issue for criminal trials, one jurisprudence considers ...


2

Does a sitting US president require a passport to travel internationally? The other answer is correct to say that the president has a passport, and in fact the president probably has at least two because he would retain his ordinary passport when the diplomatic passport was issued. But the question is whether the president requires a passport to travel ...


2

Yes. This could be done. Nothing about the constitutional law of impeachment forbids it.


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