99

The bolded part doesn't apply to President Trump. Specifically, it includes the following: of a term to which some other person was elected President President Trump is only serving in the term to which he was elected. If, in addition to the current term where he has been elected president, he had also served over two years of a term to which someone else ...


30

The bolded section does not preclude somebody from serving two non-consecutive terms, it says that if somebody serves or acts as president for more than half of a term without being elected president (probably because they were vice president and filled a vacancy), they can only be elected to one full term. Trump lost the election and will not serve or act ...


17

This clause would be for a Vice President who becomes president. If Pence had become President for two years and a day because something happened to Trump, then Pence could only be elected once as President. If Trump threw the towel in right now and Pence became President for two months, he could then become President for two terms.


14

According to Wikipedia, they announced Al Gore as winner of the state of Florida in the 2000 presidential elections: The controversy began on election night, November 7, 2000, when the national television networks, using information provided to them by the Voter News Service, an organization formed by the Associated Press to help determine the outcome of ...


11

The 2020 Democratic Party Platform, adopted at the DNC and on which Biden & Harris stood, covers a lot of their policies on this subject. Just to pick out a few: Grants for Historically Black Colleges & Universities (pg. 10) Expanded funding for Community Development Financial Institutions (pg. 11) A promise to increase the authority & funding-...


10

There's no legal method by which Trump could stay in office or extend his powers past January 20. Trump can't extend his term directly: the Constitution as amended by the Twentieth Amendment states that the president's term ends on January 20, and there is no mechanism for changing that short of another amendment, a procedure that the President has no part ...


8

No. It does not matter if President Trump never concedes this election. If, as expected, a majority of the Electoral College votes votes for Mr. Biden, then Trump's term will end on January 20. The machinery of the federal government, including the armed forces will recognise Biden, and not Trump, as the President, and will act accordingly.


7

There are several steps in making the results official: First, the state election official (usually the Secretary of State) will certify the results. This effectively "locks in" the popular vote, and decides how the state will allocate its electors. The date when this happens varies from state to state (and election to election, depending on ...


7

The only way that Donald Trump's current term can be extended is by amending the constitution. This requires the agreement of 2/3 of the House, 2/3 of the Senate, and 3/4 of the individual States to agree. There is no prospect of any of the above agreeing to such an amendment. It is worth noting that the quickest timeframe between an amendment being ...


7

No one actually gets 270 Electoral votes until the Electors vote in their States on December 14th. When a State or Election gets "called", that's not an official thing: it's a judgement by the news networks that, based on the officially released vote counts and other evidence (like exit polls), that candidate is almost certainly going to win that ...


7

Federico said in a comment lots of small counties and not so many huge counties That's part of it. Another part is that mailed ballots take longer to process. They must be opened and then read, and the vote then recorded. Where both in-person ballots and mail-in ballots are counted by a scanner, the in-person ballots are counted as they are cast, and ...


6

Every state in the US has their own election law. Those laws define the rules for processing mail-in votes, under which conditions a vote is considered valid and how long the counting takes place. As long as those state laws aren't violated, there is little way to challenge those elections in a state-level court of law. However, it would be possible to ...


6

Assuming he is not re-elected, President Trump's term comes to an end at 12:00 EST on January 20, 2021. It is at this moment that President Biden would be sworn in if he wins the election, and thus, if Mr. Trump is still in the White House by that point, he can be removed if President Biden does not wish him to be there.


6

TL;DR in the past 20 years, there were 3 US Presidential Elections with significant recounts in at least one state (2020, 2016, 2000), and in all those cases, the net change on results at state level was smaller than a one twenty-fifth of one percent (the largest net vote change was approx. 2000 votes in Georgia in 2020) 2020 Georgia: On November 11, the ...


6

Assuming the election stands as it is currently projected he can run again in 2024 as the only limitation on serving is two terms that are 2 years or more in length or being elected twice. https://www.constituteproject.org/constitution/United_States_of_America_1992 No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who ...


5

There isn't an answer that is so general. Certain kinds of false official reports are prohibited in particular contexts, but there is not a general rule that makes it illegal or a crime to mislead a President of the United States (that's what politicians and lobbyists do). In the context of the quote it doesn't look like any false statements of fact were ...


5

In theory, this could be done. However, it isn’t necessary in practice because both sides accept the general principal that the President should be allowed to pick his own Cabinet, no matter how much Senators may dislike the specific appointees. It’s the same for ambassadors and other executive branch appointees. Notably, all of these are easily removed ...


5

What do US presidents and their executive branches usually do during their lame duck periods? They issue pardons, typically including pardoning a turkey from execution shortly before Thanksgiving Day. Traditionally, not much is done in the case where the incoming President comes from the opposing party. In the case where an outgoing President does do ...


5

To (hopefully) clarify a comment for people who might not be aware of this: when you see reporting percentages, those are frequently not percentages of votes tallied; rather, they're percentages of voting precincts reporting. Precincts aren't uniformly sized, and precincts with larger groups of voters can take quite a bit longer to count than e.g. the ...


5

Impeachment is a political process, not a legal one. The House impeaches if a majority of its members think that they are politically advantaged in doing so. The Senate convicts if 2/3 of its members think that they are politically advantaged in doing so. Generally members of the President's own party would only impeach/convict if they felt that they would ...


4

As far as impeachment goes, public opinion doesn't really matter. Power over federal impeachments are granted solely to the House of Representatives (a.k.a. Congress). As Wikipedia says about impeachments: There are several provisions in the United States Constitution relating to impeachment: Article I, Section 2, Clause 5 provides: The House of ...


4

TL;DR: No, Congress cannot. However, this can be mandated at the State level. So, I found an article discussing this (though it's related to the SARS outbreak). This mostly discusses whether doing so violates the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Here is a relevant part (of the earlier article): When determining the legality of a statute enacted to ...


4

The Chicago Daily Tribune famously messed it up in 1948 to meet a printing deadline resulting in this famous photo source


4

Yes, he can. You say '... which said no person can run for president twice...' - it nowhere talks about running for president. You can run for President as often as you want, consecutively or not, twentyfive times if you care (if you live long enough). Any limitations are about being elected for President, and Trump was only elected once so far.


3

When will this chapter be officially closed? Answer from Joe W: The final results are not official until January 6th when they are presented to both chambers of congress. The individual states have until December 14th for the its electors to be decided and not all states bind electors to vote the way the state did.


3

You are misreading the Amendment. Basically it is saying that you can’t be elected President to a 3rd term, with a term being defined as having been elected President or having served as President for two years. So a crazy scenario to show how this works. President A/VP B are elected, after swearing in ceremony A gets hit in the head by pigeon dropped by a ...


3

The Electoral College is part of the constitution. But if this time the Electoral College can't state a winner, maybe because one or more states have two delegations claiming to be the correct one, then the decision is transferred. If there the GOP has the majority, ... The constitution is older than the internet, so it doesn't consider everyone knowing how ...


3

Because another Q was deemed to be a duplicate of this Q, I want to offer an answer to the question (from the closed Q): That "new" Q asks: Why is the pace of vote counting so fast on the first day? Why does it slow down afterwards? Consider the County where I live: On election day there were 212 precincts, each precinct has one or more voting ...


2

On which legal basis is this even possible? The situation in Pennsylvania is questionable. The Pennsylvania legislature passed a law in 2019 permitting mail-in voting and requiring that those ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in order to be counted. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court later ruled that, given the extraordinary circumstances ...


1

Your question is very confusing. You seem to be held up on the two terms being non-consecutive, but there is no wording in the 22nd amendment that would seem to have anything to do with that. Can Donald Trump run as president in 2024 and become president? He can run, and if he wins he can become president. He has only been elected to the office once, in ...


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