46

IT DEPENDS ON WHAT YOU MEAN BY 'COST.' In politics, the words are often moulded to have meanings beyond what they would mean in common, conversational contexts. Here, the word 'cost,' is being applied in a very specific way. The Biden Administration is claiming that the program will not require any increase in the national debt. That's why the tweet you ...


35

Well, at the very least Eric Feigin - the Deputy Solicitor General who responded to Barrett's question - argued that the positions aren't contradictory. The administration's position is that the current moratorium on executions is in place to enable a review of the current execution protocol, that the judgement of the jury in the first instance should be ...


31

There aren't numbers for the first 100 days AFAIK, but The American Presidency Project has a feature that tracks these numbers by year, dating back to President Calvin Coolidge. President Biden has held less formal news conferences in his first year as compared to past Presidents. However, these numbers exclude impromptu interactions with the press which was ...


20

Apparently, the basis of the zero cost claim is that it will "reuse" unspent funds from a Covid bill. This has been judged a pretty misleading though, e.g. by WaPo, which gave it "2+" Pinocchios since the final cost isn't even known. There's also the issue that goes under "the plan" has been changing: Originally [...] two bills ...


8

Something that hasn't been mentioned is that, assuming a government has a functioning corporate tax regime in place (a big "if"), spending it does on things like infrastructure, education, and other things that make people and businesses more productive does pay for itself, in whole or in part. If the government builds a bridge between a buyer of ...


6

There is US precedent for executing purely domestic politically motivated terrorists, i.e. Timothy McVeigh. The US government regularly employs de facto death sentences as foreign policy, e.g. drone strikes, etc. Here the government's thinking might be that because the Tsarnaevs considered themselves political retaliators against such US foreign policies, ...


5

You seem to be asking more about the rhetoric than the actual accounting, so is the nature of the claim not addressed by the language on The Build Back Better Agenda website? The Build Back Better Agenda is an ambitious plan to create jobs, cut taxes, and lower costs for working families – all paid for by making the tax code fairer and making the wealthiest ...


2

This is a fairly complex, nuanced case. You are correct in mentioning that there seems to be a contradiction or even paradoxical reasoning behind the rhetoric that is coming from both the executive and judicial branches. I don't think that is bad, actually- even though it is this type of game that is played to conserve political capital. Which means that ...


2

I haven't followed all the developments in the Biden administration suspension of the death penalty, but some of the concerns seem to be about methods rather than whether it should ultimately resumed at all: US Attorney General Merrick Garland has ordered a moratorium on federal executions while the Justice Department continues its review of the death ...


2

Well, Sonia Gandhi, the Italian-born widow of the assasinated Rajiv Gandhi won the 1998 election to the leadership of the Congress Party - the political party that has governed India for most of the time since independence from Britain in 1947. She remained in that office for 22 years, and led the party to victory at the 2004 elections - but she declined the ...


1

The cabinet ministers serve at the discretion of the president. Formally, they are not named by the prime minister but by the president “on the advice of the prime minister”. The most important decisions, including naming ambassadors or key military leaders require a décret en conseil de ministres signed by the president with a countersignature by the prime ...


1

This doesn't fully fit the bill but is an interesting example nonetheless. Remember that the two-term limit wasn't actually enshrined in the constitution until the 22nd Amendment was passed in 1951 after Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected a total of four times between 1932 and 1944. It was only considered good form prior to said amendment in part because ...


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