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There is no real shortage of toilet paper, though hoarding is going on, reinforced by media coverage of toilet paper issues. The president may or may not have the levers to increase supply, I defer to other answers there. But perhaps a more relevant response, given that there is no shortage, would be rationing. However, it's not all that difficult to make ...


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To delve a bit into philosophy here, Trump demonstrates a distorted form of what Nietzsche called 'master morality,' which might seem alien to most people. Nietzsche's master morality values strength, power, beauty, victory, wealth: all the material/physical symbols of practical success are interpreted as moral goods, and all their opposites or lacks are ...


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The President has no control over supply or demand If The President wanted more hot dogs in the US, he/she can't just order people to make more hot dogs. If there's a meat shortage, you can't make hot dogs. Or maybe your factory burned down. Or maybe the local health authorities shut you down for being unsanitary. Or maybe people are panicked buying toilet ...


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President Trump was able to do that with ventilators because of the Defense Production Act: On March 18, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, President Trump issued an executive order that defined ventilators and protective equipment as "essential to the national defense", the standard required by the DPA.[17][18] Later that day, he indicated that ...


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Who has the authority to enforce isolation and quarantine because of a communicable disease?. The Federal government derives its authority for isolation and quarantine from the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Under section 361 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S. Code § 264), the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to ...


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Trump is weighing the economy vs lives saved. That is his job No leader wants to be in the position Trump is in. For instance, it has been stated that Winston Churchill knew in advance of a bombing raid on Coventry but chose to take no action. Ignoring the controversy over the assertion, this comment at the end is apropos "But even if Churchill had known ...


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I can't speak for Rebecca's judgement in interpreting those words of Trump, but for instance a NYT article says: “Our people want to return to work,” Mr. Trump declared Tuesday on Twitter, adding, “THE CURE CANNOT BE WORSE (by far) THAN THE PROBLEM!” In essence, he was raising an issue that economists have long grappled with: How can a society assess ...


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Section 5 1: Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business https://constitutionus.com/ If more than half of a House is killed, it will not be able to establish a quorum. Under the normal meaning of "quorum", that would mean that it would not ...


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The constitution contains rules for how the government should operate in normal times. It can't provide for every eventuality, or for every emergency situation. While the constitution does give guidance for how government should proceed in some situations (for example the 25th amendment provisions for the removal of a President who is unable to discharge ...


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In terms of not achieving the nomination of their party due to losing the primary contests directly, no. However, there have been times when the incumbent president seeking re-election has pulled out of the contest early, for example in 1968 when Lyndon B. Johnson pulled out of the race after winning the first primary in New Hampshire by only 7 percent - ...


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No incumbent president has lost his primary race, but you have to keep in mind that primaries are a 20th century invention basically. The 1976 campaign season was the year in which primaries started to matter more than ever before, and is considered the closest a sitting President has come to losing his party’s nomination in modern history. President ...


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But on the ballot is simply a name, not an identity. The ballot typically has the candidate's name and party. So if “Donald J. Trump (Republican Party)” wins the election, any confusion could be cleared up by contacting the Republican National Committee and asking which Donald J. Trump that is. And they will have a paper trail backing up the ...


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In a comment, you wrote But on the ballot is simply a name, not an identity. A name is an identity. The name is on the ballot for the sole purpose of identifying an individual. If two people with the same name claim to have been elected to the same office, there is a mechanism for identifying the correct individual. In the case of the US presidency, ...


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According to the 22nd Amendment, any person who fills an unexpired presidential term for longer than two years is only eligible to be elected to the presidency proper for one term. Otherwise, the two term limit still applies, for a maximum of 10 years as president. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person ...


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Because you have no proof whatsoever to being the elected person. There is a lot of paperwork associated with becoming a candidate and appearing on the ballot. Paperwork only the actual person who was elected would have access to. An individual running for a seat in the House or Senate or for the office of U.S. President becomes a candidate when he or ...


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First, this has never really happened in the United States. In extreme emergencies and national disasters, elections have been held a few days late, but never suspended (unlike, for example, the United Kingdom, that suspended elections during World War II). Elections were also not canceled during the Civil War, or as a result of the War of 1812 (during which ...


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