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18

The age requirement for US presidents is 35; see Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 of the Constitution: No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to ...


19

Immediately upon removal. The Presidential succession clause in Article II of the Constitution was superseded by the 25th Amendment (emphasis mine): Section 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President. There is no gap between Presidents. Compare this to what ...


8

If a president is removed from office after being impeached, when does the vice president take office? Upon removal from office, under Article II, Section 1 paragraph 6, the duties of the president devolve upon the vice president. In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and ...


1

Based on youth rights groups viewing the 35/yr age requirement for president as "unjustified age discrimination" and various western nations having 18 as the age requirement, "Why not lower this threshold?" While the constitution does specify the age requirement, the age can be amended. Even so, why the age shouldn't be amended comes down to brain ...


2

Your title question reads as a somewhat more mechanical point than your closing one, but perhaps I’m just mincing words. Why does US still require the President a fairly high age (35) in order to be able to serve? Possibly more daunting than the requirements needed to amend the constitution is the incentive to do so in the first place. From a ...


84

The reason for the founding fathers to do this was in part because they viewed the President as supposed to be an elder statesman who had shown through his career to be reliable in his values and not prone to the changing whims of the public, as well as effectively lead the nation and represent a generally unifying acceptance of a large majority of people ...


40

The age minimum is set by the US Constitution. It is very challenging to pass constitutional amendments, and so far not enough people have both wanted to change and cared enough about changing the age minimum for it to be changed via constitutional amendmendment.


37

Short Answer The president can give the Presidential Medal of Freedom to anybody at any time. The choice is entirely at his/her discretion. Medal of Freedom – Truman The link in your question leads to a description of the "Medal of Freedom", an award created by President Harry Truman in 1945, under Executive Order 9586. This is NOT the medal that ...


2

Yes, they could be impeached, but it might be more difficult. The grounds for impeachment and removal in the Constitution are very vague, and it's up to Congress to interpret them and decide whether they apply to the current President's actions. In doing so, they often look at history for guidance. They review documents written by the framers of the ...


5

Of course, it's not a matter of black letter law. But assuming a partisan situation, Democrats are unlikely to try and impeach another president for similar behavior, because they know the Republicans won't assist. (And if the Republicans do assist, it will make this impeachment look worse for them.) Any Republican trying to impeach a president for similar ...


6

Kinda surprised at the answers so far, which seem to miss the point. Republicans think Hunter Biden's testimony is relevant because: They think it will establish if Trump had a legitimate concern about the Bidens and Burisma. If the answer to this is yes, there is a legitimate concern, then it's arguable that Trump had a responsibility to care about ...


23

Could President A set precedent with something and then President B could do the same thing and be impeached for doing that same exact thing? Yes, absolutely. It is usually understood that Congress can impeach and remove a president for anything it deems official misconduct (so-called "high crimes and misdemeanors"). What Congress deems official misconduct ...


27

It should be noted, first of all, that impeachment is a political process and not a legal one. This means that the precedent argument is not as strong as it would be in, for example, a Supreme Court case. In a legal case, a large part of a court's job is to interpret the meaning of a law. When a court makes a determination of the meaning of a law, then ...


5

Trump has been credibly accused of abuse of power, solicitation of a bribe, and obstruction - all in order to (dis)inform the US voters that Joe Biden may be corrupt. Of all the alleged crimes to be judged in the impeachment trial, creating the public impression that Joe Biden is corrupt was the alleged payoff, the purpose, the motivation. Since there has ...


-5

Per Pam Bondi, the democrats brought up Burisma/Hunter Biden over 400 times. So the republicans felt obliged to respond. Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry/live-blog/trump-impeachment-trial-live-coverage-president-s-defense-begins-day-n1123371/ncrd1124211#liveBlogHeader


5

One of the criticisms of the alleged quid pro quo is that Trump's request was purely political, calling on a foreign power solely to manufacture or dig up dirt on a sitting president's opposing candidate. However, if it can be shown that there was reasonable evidence to suspect foul play in which Joe Biden may have been involved, the grounds for impeachment ...


1

With all the legal pretense, it was never more than a proxy for a popular-removal vote. If we take the Nixon case, the only one where conviction in the Senate might have happened. Although congressional Republicans decided to stick with the president after the Saturday Night Massacre and hope he could turn things around before they faced the voters, ...


65

'Why' questions are inherently difficult, often de-evolving to opinion-mongering. Unless someone in the White House tells us their reasoning explicitly, we could only guess. However, what we can say is that the White House and its supporters have consistently held that the Bidens and Burisma were involved in some unspecified form of corruption in the ...


46

Four reasons: Whataboutism. It's easy to make potshots at vague 'questionable' behavior without actually trying to get to the bottom of it and punish those responsible. Add to that a refusal to defend one's own actions, and people quickly come to believe that 'all politicians do (X bad behavior)'. This has worked amazingly well for Trump against Hillary ...


3

Trump may be largely ignorant of the US political system, but he has decades of experience with the legal system, through bankruptcies, civil suits, and the like. Trump sees the legal system as a means to delay, harass, and confuse issues, with the ultimate goal of bleeding his opponent dry of time, money, and energy before any actual ruling occurs. Trump ...


6

In the U.S., Impeachment trials are "Quasi-Criminal Proceedings" (QCP) which are civil court cases which may result in criminal penalties. IN QCPs, the rights of the defendant must be protected as if the proceeding was criminal in nature and not civil (so if a wrongful death suit alleges criminal conduct was part of the reason for the death, than the ...


4

He would almost certainly have signed a non-disclosure agreement granting the CIA and the NSA the right to review the book before publication. Edward Snowden got hit for violating that clause A federal judge in Virginia has ruled that the U.S. government has the authority to seize the proceeds of Edward Snowden's book because he failed to submit his book ...


2

Terms like populist and populism have multiple meanings, and their application (at least in the U.S.) is mostly a matter of opinion. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the connotation of populist has often been disapproving or derogatory. Wikipedia says: Populism refers to a range of political stances that emphasize the idea of "ordinary people"...


3

The short, cynical answer would be that laws have mostly been made by old men. Further, that older people tend to look at younger people (not without some justification) as less "wise", experienced, and competent, and that older people too frequently do not imagine or perceive their own decline in ability, and even if they do they have no interest in giving ...


4

Historically, Presidents typically tend to be in their mid 50s when they entered office. Kennedy remains the youngest President elected to office at 43 while Teddy Roosevelt is the youngest president at time of inauguration (Teddy was Vice President to McKinley, who was assassinated while in office, and Teddy ascended to the Presidency at the young age of ...


6

The US political system at the federal level currently vastly favors individual office holders over political parties. The parties have very little power other than as "alliance arrangements" between office holders, despite their considerable organizational and fundraising abilities. And to the limited extent that parties are important in the US, only two ...


4

In 1947 Truman invited Herbert Hoover to analyze areas in which the federal government could be improved. Eisenhower invited him to perform a second round in 1953. Wikipedia says Kennedy invited him to do more. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoover_Commission George W Bush had many cabinet members who worked under his father and would have certainly ...


12

Part of the answer may be that the US constitution does not allow the president to be younger than 35 years old. And there are also minimum ages for congress.


1

Belgium is a constitutional monarchy. Either way for me, this is an apples and oranges question. The constitution in the different states differ widely with regard to the division of responsibility and power between the head of state or the head of government. The Bundespräsident in Germany has basically only ceremonial duties while the power is in the ...


84

I'm not terribly sure that leaving outliers aside (both Trump and Macron are such) there's that much of a difference, historically, between the major European countries and the US. The Economist ran a short article on this in 2017, the best part of which is this graph: They observe than in all four countries the gap (between the median population age and ...


31

Do former US presidents have the right to receive daily CIA briefings? Whether any such briefings are daily or as needed is not clear. As mentioned below, briefings concerning activities with which the former president was aware could be significant. WHY DOES OBAMA GET INTELLIGENCE BRIEFINGS? TRUMP DENIES TRYING TO HALT ACCESS: 'FAKE NEWS', 8/21/18. Why ...


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