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11

There are a number of inaccuracies in the reporting. First, what Trump signed was a series of presidential memorandums, not executive orders. The practical difference between the two doesn't really matter in this case, though. Second, what you describe is actually two different memorandums. The first, deferring the payment of payroll taxes, is probably ...


3

Yes. An executive order can be undone simply by issuing another executive order reversing the first.


5

I hate being the one always pointing things like this out, but... This EO is not meant to actually provide any actual aid. As best I can tell, the GOP stalled the discussions in Congress specifically so that Trump could write this executive order, because it satisfies all their interests. Trump can give the appearance of caring about the issue and providing ...


4

TLDR Summary The Constitution says electors vote for both President and Vice President 3 U.S. Code § 7 says electors vote for both President and Vice President Some states have "candidates for President and Vice President" in their election laws It's never been done so the above election laws are untested It's never been done so the response of ...


0

Bit of trivia context; Upon founding of US constitution the VP role went to the candidate with second most votes in the general election. Then the 12th amendment of 1804 required to cast a separate vote for president and VP. But until the 1960's VP's were chosen by the candidate and party, not necessarily before election. Therefore in short, the answer is ...


7

"Surrender" is not a power that is explicit in the constitution. A complete surrender, such as occurred at the end of the second world war in Germany would imply the constitution ceasing to function. The de-facto constitution would be "military occupation" followed by a new constitution written by the victors. However surrender can also ...


12

It's not clear that he has such powers. The "emergency economic powers" derives from the IEEPA of 1977 which allow the president to act against an unusual and extraordinary threat... to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States [that originates] in whole or substantial part outside the United States. It would allow ...


10

Note: I originally considered voting to close the question as too hypothetical, but technically I think it has a logical answer. This scenario describes a coup: taking power by force or threat. The success of a coup usually depends whether the army supports it or not. If the coup succeeds the dictator has no reason to form a coalition with anybody. If the ...


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