Hot answers tagged

70

He is not obliged to hold them at all, much less answer questions, or any specific questions. The only requirement of addressing anyone is the state of the union, and that is not required to be a speech, it could be written. He shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union... Article II, Section 3, US Constitution ...


36

There is no constitutional oblication, but it is an axiom of a democratic system that a president who wants to achieve his or her political aims must do so by persuasion. A president in a democracy who refused to meet the press and answer their questions would be neglecting one of the chief advantages of their position. By holding press conferences the ...


21

Since you ask about the situation around the world, as an example of such a law (kind of) the UK has the Representation of the People Act 1983 which among other clauses has: 106 (1) A person who, or any director of any body or association corporate which— (a) before or during an election, (b) for the purpose of affecting the return of any candidate at the ...


15

After the Law and Justice (PiS) party of Poland won parliamentary elections in 2019, the PiS announced a 232-page election manifesto promising a "new media order". This political party also has a lot of control over state media including the influential TV station TVP. The party has also been able to sue certain newspapers it doesn't like over a joke, ...


12

It's not clear that he has such powers. The "emergency economic powers" derives from the IEEPA of 1977 which allow the president to act against an unusual and extraordinary threat... to the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States [that originates] in whole or substantial part outside the United States. It would allow ...


11

The journalist has (probably) committed libel, which is (mostly) not a crime in the US but can result in civil liability (i.e. B could sue the journalist). Since A and the journalist conspired to produce this fake news, they would likely share in this liability (assuming B can prove they acted in concert). To establish a case of libel or defamation in the US,...


10

There have been several incidents, and several responses, but the most widely covered seems to be the case of the CNN reporter, Omar Jimenez and his crew, who were arrested and released about an hour later. Today, the Minnesota governor personally apologized to the reporter, and accepted responsibility for the incident. One initial explanation for the ...


9

Attacks on foreign journalists reporting in the US seem to have drawn a stronger response, since they have a government willing to fight on their behalf. For example, 2 Australian journalists were recently attacked in Washington DC by, reportedly, the United States Park Police. This attack has drawn sharp criticism from the Australian Prime Minister and led ...


5

OpenSecrets has a list of some Qatari PR contributions during their recent conflict with the Saudi-led part of the Arab world. These are by no means unique; the same source has a similar list of Turkish efforts, for example. Likewise they have a list for Saudi Arabia. OpenSecrets' articles seem to be based mostly on FARA disclosures though. They don't seem ...


4

"Three Russian newspapers publish identical front page headlines to protest detention of investigative journalist" This was back in June 2019, in protest of the handling of Ivan Golunov, a 36-year-old journalist known for exposing corruption among Moscow city officials, who was detained by police and accused of serious drug offences.


4

Well, journalism is a job like any other and at least in Europe every one has the right to strike. In Italy is quite common, and it can result in newspapers not being printed at all, news broadcasts not being broadcasted or being reduced to a 5 minutes thing, and websites not being updated. It's hard to come up a specific source for it, and even more if you ...


4

I assume the biggest is Amnesty International. https://www.amnestyusa.org/ They do in-depth analysis of police brutality around the world. Both by reacting to current events but also by writing reports of systematic misuse of power over time. Personally I wouldn't expect them to change much in most countries. Politicians most often disagree with their ...


4

To answer the question about trust in the written press, I think we need to zoom out. Let's first have a look at trust in institutions more broadly. That's a fair step because your figure compares different news media in different countries. So not only are the news organizations different, so are their audiences. Comparing trust in institutions ...


3

No, so far I can find no direct acknowledgement of this issue coming from the Trump administration to date. The NY Times noted on June 1: The arrest of the CNN team drew criticism from First Amendment advocates and an apology from Minnesota’s governor, but there have been dozens of other instances of journalists receiving rough treatment at the hands of ...


2

The other answers are overlooking a fairly obvious point. While there is no requirement for a President to hold press conferences, or to answer press questions, most if not all Presidents in the past century have done so. (The first formal press conference seems to have been held in 1913, during the Wilson administration: https://www.whitehousehistory.org/...


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