7

Unfortunately, your idea would be likely to fall foul of 'sore loser' laws, enacted in most states with the general intention of preventing unsuccessful candidates in one party's primary from running either as a candidate of another party or as an independent candidate. These laws have been enacted by most states in some form - according to Sore Loser Laws ...


6

In General Elections, Voting For Unopposed Candidates Sometimes Matters In very small municipalities and special districts, an unopposed candidate typically needs at least one vote to be elected, so your vote could make that difference if almost no one else ends up voting. In cases where, contrary to your question, there is a write in possibility and your ...


2

In general, yes, there is a fairly strong correlation between the margin of victory (i.e. the difference between the number of votes cast) in Senate primary elections and the margin of victory in the general. However, if we restrict ourselves to elections where the margin of victory in the primary was less than 20 percentage points, there is far less of a ...


2

In general, there is a decent correlation between the margin of victory in the Senate primaries - in terms of the total number of votes - and the margin of victory in the Presidential election. However, it is questionable whether this metric is a good one to use when predicting the result, for the same reasons Joe W laid out in his answer to a related ...


1

If by "Democrat", you mean their party affiliation, anyone can register as whatever party they want whenever they want (although if they do it too close to a primary election, they may not get the new party's ballot). But you seem to think that government officials have some sort of official status with respect to their party. They do not. There is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible