66

He can negotiate and sign agreements without involving parliament yes, but Parliament will need to ratify the agreement once signed for it to come into force. So far he's negotiating with the EU just as Theresa May did. Once his negotiations were complete and an agreement was signed, it would then need to be brought to Parliament. In May's case she managed ...


26

In all cases that I can think of, the minister is told to resign, and they do so. Even in cases when it is clear to everyone that the Minister has been fired, it is presented as a resignation1. Consider the sacking of Damien Green. He writes: I regret that I've been asked to resign from the Government following breaches of the Ministerial Code, for which ...


25

Under current Conservative Party rules, she remains leader, and cannot be subject to a party confidence vote for another year. Being a party matter, none of this affects any parliamentary vote of no confidence which might take place. Source: BBC News. See also: Leadership Elections in the Conservative Party, House of Commons briefing paper 01366, July ...


18

She resigned as the conservative party leader effective June 7th. That will lead to a new prime minister in due course, since her successor in the party role would presumably want to become the new prime minister, but until then she is prime minister.


16

Based on the reporting, she's staying a bit longer for two main reasons: The prime minister will remain in Downing Street, to shoulder the blame for what are expected to be dire results for her party from Thursday’s European elections – and to host Donald Trump when he visits. Trump will be visiting the UK from June 3 to June 5. Another issue, which ...


15

Specifically in the case of the Brexit process things are a bit different, Section 13 of the EU withdrawal act requires a meaningful vote The documents and an associated statement have been published. “The negotiated Withdrawal Agreement and the framework for the future relationship have been approved by a resolution of the House of Commons on a ...


15

How much power does Parliament actually wield in a situation like this? Could they force a recalcitrant Prime Minister to take actions he/she does not agree with using another method (i.e. legislation) Yes, see the Benn Act, which does exactly this. can the Prime Minister simply sit on their hands to avoid any actions, and suffer no real legal ...


13

Legally, the status of ministers, as for other MPs, up until their resignation or "sacking", is that of an Office holder, which is separate from that of an employee. As such, the employment rights enjoyed by employees are not conferred to MPs by the same legislation. If parliamentary office were employment, being sacked as a minister would really be a ...


13

British Prime Ministers always leave office by resignation, unless they die in office. If their party loses a general election, they resign, although not always instantly. Gordon Brown remained Prime Minister for several days after the 2010 General Election, because no party had a majority of seats, and it took time to form the Conservative-LibDem ...


11

The most honest answer would be that no-one really knows. Until the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act 2011, the situation couldn't arise because a PM who lost the ability to govern could use the royal prerogative to call an election. The legal theory is that Parliament is sovereign (subject to caveats about Queen's Consent), but the details of how that works in ...


10

She will almost certainly remain as interim leader of both the Conservative Party and the Government until the new leader is appointed, as David Cameron did in 2016. Note that the two roles are technically separate - she is Prime Minister by appointment of the Queen, and because she can command a majority in the Commons, but Party Leader because she won an ...


9

The President is intended to be the ceremonial head-of-state, and a figurehead, rather than a person wielding political power. The President is chosen by an electoral college consisting of parliament, the senate and the provinces. The Prime Minister holds political power. The Leader of the largest party in parliament becomes Prime Minister. The situation ...


9

There are three ways in which a Prime Minister can be removed from office involuntarily: Under the terms of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011, lose a no confidence vote in the House of Commons, fail to win a confidence vote within two weeks, and then lose the subsequent election. An early election can also be called if 2/3 of the Commons votes for it. Be ...


8

The UK constitution is based, in part, on tradition and convention. By tradition, the Prime Minister must be a member of the House of Commons. As such they must be 18 or over and a British, Irish or Commonwealth citizen. They cannot be a noble, though it is possible to renounce one's hereditary position in order to stand for Parliament. The Queen is also ...


8

The modern government of the United Kingdom is a government by a cabinet of ministers, which is chaired by a Prime Minister. The Consitution of the UK is unwritten (or at least, undocumented) the postion of "Prime Minister" is one of those positions which is not defined by a written constitution, nevertheless it has a clearly defined role. The modern ...


7

The impartiality of the speaker and their role of chairing debates and representing the Commons to the monarch is incompatible with being a Minister of the Crown and pursuing a political programe. Could an ex-speaker be PM? This would be possible but would still violate various conventions. A senior ex-minister is far more likely if such a circumstance ...


7

If the Prime Minister resigns, who becomes the Prime Minister and how are they selected? When a PM wishes to step down without having lost a general election, the expectation is that they announce their resignation, but don't immediately resign. Instead, they then trigger a leadership election in their party. Once the party elects a new leader, only then ...


7

Yes, the PM is a member of parliament, and subject to the same requirements of orderly conduct as any other MP. If the speaker "names" the Prime Minister, he must leave the chamber. The only MP exempt from this rule is the speaker (or the deputy speaker when acting as speaker)


6

Aside from the political reasons given in Denis de Bernardy's answer, there are administrative benefits to the delay, such as Conservative MPs vanishing off from Westminster for the Whitsun recess next week, and the 1922 Committee (who run things like this in the Conservative party) having already starting planning for a contest commencing on the 10th of ...


6

Two forms of democracy are common worldwide: A parliamentary democracy where citizens elect a parliament and the parliament elects the executive (presidents, prime ministers, etc.). A presidential democracy where citizens separately elect a parliament and the leader of the executive. There are good reasons from history and political theory to prefer one or ...


6

There is no special provision in the UK constitution for the removal of a Prime Minister on mental health grounds. The Prime Minister is primus inter pares in the Cabinet system of government. In the unlikely situation of the Prime Minister suffering from a serious mental breakdown, the Cabinet could remove her. The office of Prime Minister is appointed by ...


6

No, this has never happened. The reasons for that have evolved over time. It might have been possible for a member of the Royal Family to become a Prime Minister sitting in the Lords during the eighteenth century, but it would certainly have been highly controversial and did not occur. Since at least the early nineteenth century, it would have been viewed ...


6

In effect, yes. The PM can't simply announce a general election purely on their own authority, but they can file a motion of no confidence in their own government in the Commons, and then instruct their MPs to vote for it. This would cause a general election.


6

There are lots of articles giving reasons against term limits, e.g. Brookings institute. An argument against term limits is that experience makes people better at their jobs. If someone is a successful and talented leader, why force them to quit? Why not let voters decide? Depending on your political beliefs, Franklin Roosevelt was arguably one of the most ...


6

It's less of a question of why they allow it, and more of a question of why they didn't create term limits. In the UK it appears that there was simply never much call for term limits or political will to implement them. The UK hasn't had problems with Prime Minsters overstaying their welcome.


6

The rub is that if he resigns there's no guarantee he'll get an election. The ad-hoc coalition that opposes a no-deal Brexit could form a government. Since some answers provide contrary opinion, here's a further quote from the Cabinet manual of what happens a government resigns without having a majority: 2.13 Where a range of different administrations ...


6

Running a modern state gets so complicated that the key qualification for heads of government is to manage a staff of advisers, the ability to take advice, and the political judgement to manage competing claims for budget and attention. By your reasoning, each prime minister should be a climate scientist, too, and an IT professional, and a teacher, and so ...


5

Not only is Johnson’s procedure legal, it is in no way ‘bypassing parliament’ and it is the proper way to negotiate international agreements. The same procedure will be followed with every single trade, cooperation or foreign policy deal in the years to come. It is also the way how significant international agreements are negotiated (think of the Kyoto ...


5

By literal definition? None. In effect? Quite a lot. The PM does effectively have the power of the crown at their disposal and may implement specific actions under the Royal Prerogative. Officially, these are actions enacted by the monarch on the advice of the PM, but (as recently occurred with the prorogation), the Queen follows the government's advice ...


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